Business people looking at a laptop

BABusiness Analysis & Technology & Management

Why this course?

Business Analysis applies advanced analytical methods to business problems to help managers make better decisions while technology is at the heart of all modern business.

Organisations need business graduates with expertise in business technology. Business analysts have an excellent general awareness of how a business works. They’re also able to apply advanced analytical methods to deal with specific management issues.

Studying management will help you understand theory and develop the skills to put it into practice. Management is sometimes defined as the achievement of results with, and through, others.

Whether the challenge is developing profitable new products or improving the health of our nation, the answer often comes down to management.

Create your own course

Modern business is too complex to be covered by a single subject: modern managers need to have a broad outlook.

You choose basic classes in business and other disciplines, alongside the Business School’s Management Development Programme. You’ll study a wide variety of subjects and create a curriculum to suit your interests and needs.

You also have the opportunity to try new subjects, some of which you won’t have experienced at school or college. At the beginning of Year 2, you choose two subjects to continue studying in Years 2 and 3. You’ll also select a third, ‘minor’ subject and take further Management Development skills classes.

Apply under the general UCAS entry code N100 if you’d prefer to discuss your subject choices once you arrive. To study accounting, apply under N400 or one of the other accounting codes listed on the site.

What you'll study

Business Analysis & Technology

Year 1

We'll introduce you to key managerial and operational issues and techniques. A wide range of modelling techniques will be discussed and aspects of the practical problems and opportunities of technology use in business highlighted.

Years 2 & 3

These classes demonstrate the use of analytical models and problem-structuring methods in real business contexts as well as providing you with an understanding of the management challenges caused by technological innovation.

Through individual and team work, you'll develop practical skills in the practice of management. The classes develop specific modelling techniques and provide the basics of operations management as well as delivering knowledge of how information systems can be used to support managers.

Year 4 (Honours)

You'll have the opportunity to undertake a major project for a client organisation. You'll also take classes covering subjects such as management science, electronic commerce, business process integration with ERP, business analytics with data mining, project management, risk analysis & management. Subjects are revised to reflect topical developments in the use of technology by business as well as the research interests of staff.

Management

Management in a Global Context introduces the concept of management processes and practices in a global context. You'll study core classes such as Organisational Analysis & Strategy as well as a range of optional classes from across the University.

Course content

The Management Development Programme (MDP) is a core element of the undergraduate degree programme in the Strathclyde Business School.

The programme runs for the first three years of the BA degree. The entire class is driven by real business problems. The approach to learning is active problem-based, with students working in project teams.

The class aims to encourage integration of the knowledge and experience gained in Principal Subjects. Each year of the MDP focuses on different aspects of business and the content of MDP is constantly evolving and being updated and enhanced.

Year 1

Management Development Programme 1

Topics

First Year aims to help you make the transition to the university context. Semester 1 is the Thematic Semester: The World of Business Today and covers topics such as:

  • Social-Ethical-Environmental Governance (SEEG)
  • Business Ethics
  • Disruptive Technologies

Semester 2: Functional Semester: Organisations Today covers topics such as:

  • Creativity & Responsibility
  • Marketing & Sustainability across Domains

Class description

The first year of the programme is centred on the construction of knowledge in classroom setting with theoretical constructs developed. For each topic we’ve recorded a video by a Strathclyde academic who is a leading expert in the field.

You’ll watch these lectures in advance of each session and complete a pre-sessional activity. The pre-sessional work then forms the basis of team based activities work in the classroom (groups of 50 and teams of six-seven) where you develop an agreed understanding of the topic and present this to the group.

The feedback gained from this activity then feeds directly into the assessment for the block. You’ll complete 16 assignments in the two semesters of the class.

Business Analysis

Foundations of Business Analysis & Technology

Business Analysis & Technology is the study of how analytical thinking, scientific method and tools can be used to help decision making. This class aims to introduce a variety of analytical methods that form the basis of analysing any business problem as well as provide students with an overview of technological change and how it affects all aspects of an organisation.

The aims of this class are:

  • to raise awareness of the real world problems encountered by industry that can be solved through management science methodology
  • to develop an understanding of the tools and techniques used by business analysts
  • to provide students with an awareness of why and where organisations use technology
  • to highlight the integrative role of technology within organisations
  • to demonstrate the dynamic nature of technology

Management

Managing in a Global Context

This class will introduce you to the concept of the organisation and the manager’s role within it. It will further provide the grounding required to prepare you for the more complex and specialised subject matter to come both in general management and in international business. 

Year 2

Management Development Programme 2

Topics

Semester 1 topics include:

  • Working in Business Organisations
  • Working Business Research & Consultancy
  • Working Internationally
  • Working in the Third Sector
  • Rhetorics & Oratory

Semester 2 is about developing the proposal of MDP3; with a presentation and a final report.

Class description

The second year concentrates on developing understanding through industry-specific contextualisation. Sessions are weekly and three hours in length.

The sessions are thematically linked to the pathways for individualised experience in third year whilst also drawing on the theoretical knowledge developed in MDP 1. In order to develop understanding, organisations will deliver a half-day session. This consists of a one hour plenary introduction where the company and case study are introduced. This is followed by the group sessions where you undertake activities in relation to the case study set by the company.

Business Analysis

Semester 1
Analysing & Improving Operations

This class is one of the two undergraduate Business Analysis & Technology classes before the Honours year that apply various approaches to operations management problems. Following on from the fundamentals in the first year class, this class introduces you to the subject of operations management in detail and provides opportunity for you to apply some of the basic decision analysis techniques, including simulation, in this context.

Semester 2
Managing Business Processes & Information Systems

This class forms a bridge between the first year class and more advanced classes in Enterprise Resource Planning, Business Process Outsourcing, the role of ICT in business environment, etc.

The class will seek to combine conceptual and technical skills, and it will provide the basis for a series of classes in third and Honours years, especially in areas of Business Process Integration with ERP, organisational innovation and E-commerce.

Management

Organisational Analysis & Strategy

This class will analyse contemporary management and organisation by examining the different ways of ‘doing business’ implied by different organisational forms. This approach to organisational analysis suggests that too often the study of management and organisation fails to recognise the importance of different structural forms in the evaluation of management and organisation. The argument to be developed throughout the class is that there is a need to engage in structural analyses of organisations and to understand better the relationship of organisations to the wider structures in which they are embedded and how this impacts upon both the strategic direction but also the day-to-day management of a business.

Understanding Change in Organisations

This class recognises that change permeates all aspects of organisational life and that understanding change is crucial to effective management.  It'll familiarise students with the implications for change of a world that is increasingly globalised and internationalised, where public, private and 3rd sector organisations are often in continuous upheaval due to turbulent economies, to reforming imperatives, and radical new technologies.

Year 3

Management Development Programme 3

The third year of centres on individualised experience in an organisational context through one of the following pathways:

  • Internship/Charities - gain practical experience in a private or third sector organisation. You need to negotiate and locate your own organisation and experience – this is one of the key learning points of the pathway.
  • Research and consultancy - a facility for local small businesses to gain from the experience and expertise of those within SBS. You work on two live business consultancy projects (one in each semester) and, as a team of 6, develop solutions and strategic initiatives for the local SME economy.
  • International experience – only available for students who are undertaking an international exchange for either one semester or full year.
  • Vertically Integrated Projects - working on a cross-faculty basis to research longitudinal projects (including the ‘Bill Gates Toilet Challenge, Solar Panels for Gambia and Enterprise in Schools) you work with a team of students from all levels of study (first year undergraduate to final year PhD) to further the work of the project.

In addition, you’re required to undertake a social responsibility element (this accounts for one quarter of the overall workload).

These have been designed to provide support to the Curriculum for Excellence and the Widening Access to Higher Education programme. There are no formal classes for MDP3 although there is pathway support with the pathway leads and tutor support.

Business Analysis

Semester 1
Understanding & Optimising Business Systems

The first part of the course will introduce and build experience in two problem structuring methods, SODA and Soft Systems Methodology. The second part will establish an overall understanding of how supply chains work as well as appropriate modelling approaches to address various operational challenges. The third part of the course will introduce basic mathematical optimisation modelling and present how it can be used to tackle problems in different business systems, including applications in supply chains.

The fourth and final part of the course will introduce the students to the ideas of Multi-criteria Decision Analysis to make students aware of the importance of carefully defining objectives when intervening in business systems. Overall, the course will equip students with the qualitative and quantitative analytic skills and techniques in order to make action recommendations for performance improvements in complex business systems.

Semester 2
Knowledge & Innovation Management

In this class, students will develop a comprehensive picture about knowledge and innovation. It goes to the very basis of what constitutes knowledge and knowledge work, and, based on this, develops the notion of creativity, as creation of new knowledge, and subsequently conceptualises innovation as new value created from the new knowledge.

Management

Developing Theory into Practice

In order to work effectively in organisations and manage complex, multi-faceted situations, managers need to develop their abilities to work with management theories to inform their practice and vice versa. Managers need to know what constitutes good or best practice, for which they need the skills of critical reflexivity. This means they can adapt their theories in use for specific situations. This class seeks to develop the skills of critical reflexivity so that students can become more aware of their own learning process and how to apply them in context.

Management Industry Placement

This class provides students with the opportunity to gain first-hand experience working with business professionals, to develop practical and reflective skills in an industry context, and to build networks for possible future work and learning. It also provides the opportunity to apply theories studied in other classes to the analysis and interpretation of industry practices. 

Contemporary Trends in Management Practice

Management trends and fashions have been increasingly deployed in organisational practice and scrutinised in scholarly contexts over the last thirty years. Many of these practices, often referred to as ideas, tools and methods, have gained fashion status, waxing and waning in popularity over time. A large number of them have failed in practice largely due to unrealistic expectations and the complexity of organisational contexts in which they are adopted. This class is based upon student requests to learn more about contemporary management trends and the social and political factors which facilitate and undermine their application. 

Year 4

Business Analysis

Business Analytics Using Data Mining

This class builds upon students understanding of information systems. It'll provide you with the opportunity to develop analytical approaches for mining data using commercial software that'll be intellectually challenging and useful.

This class focuses on the methods used for mining data, complementing the other Honours classes that provide business context and processes.

Business Process Integration with Enterprise Resource Planning

This class investigates the application of sophisticated business technology systems to the management and, more particularly, integration of business processes.

In doing so, it builds directly on the knowledge and skills acquired as part of Management of Business Processes and, in a more indirect manner, on classes like Technological and Organisational Innovation, Information Systems in the Knowledge Economy, and Information Systems Support for Managers.

Risk Analysis & Management

Identifying and managing risk is a fundamental skill required by managers. Many models exist for supporting risk assessment and this is a major area of interest within the Management Science department.

This class will introduce you to the general concepts of risk and common measures used as well as considering ways of modelling and interpreting technical risk within the context of managing complex systems in areas such as transportation, aerospace, health.

It'll develop knowledge and skills introduced in years 1-3 in operations, statistics and modelling classes by integrating and extending them within the context of risk assessment.

Management Science 4

An important aspect of this class is the experiential learning element, where you'll work in teams on management science projects, directly for external clients.

The clients will introduce their problems, provide information during the project, and listen to your recommended solutions. These client projects will be chosen to highlight the differing nature of individual practice, allowing comparisons between qualitative and quantitative projects to be explored.

Alongside the experiential learning will be a reflective element, which will focus on issues relating to client, consultant relations and implementation of management science, as well as addressing more conceptual issues relating to problem structuring, modelling, data collection, and choosing and mixing methods in the light of your growing experience.

Professional and ethical considerations will be highlighted, introducing you to the areas of agreement and debate within the profession. This class will also include an individual or small group project, where you'll select a technique or method they haven’t previously studied to research in more depth, mirroring professional development that they will undertake in practice. This component of the class will be managed through learning contracts.

Management

Contemporary Issues in Management

This class explores important concepts and debates centred on the working lives of managers. It'll draw on a range of conceptual ideas in organisational analysis to investigate numerous contentious issues that not only lie at the heart of academic debate but also confront managers as they go about their daily lives. 

Management, Enterprise & the Rise of the Global Economy

This class embraces three principles of management:

  • business strategies and management practices might best be understood through reflection on the complex realities faced by enterprises in competitive arenas at home and abroad
  • firms can only be understood within the context of market dynamics and the economic, social, political and cultural forces bearing upon markets
  • companies and their contemporary situation can never be divorced from their past
Dynamics of Organising

This class will build on Understanding Change in Organisations by developing an advanced view of the processes of organising. The distinctively dynamic character of key theories will be framed in terms of the philosophical contrast between ‘becoming’ and ‘being’ ideas as described by Tsoukas & Chia (2002). Research methodologies that are appropriate for this dynamic approach, such as conversation/discourse analysis, longitudinal and real-time data collection, and issues of researcher reflexivity, will also be explored. Understanding of these dynamic theories of organising will be deepened through application to topics of practical managerial concern such as: strategising, institutional change, identity construction, communities of practice, innovation and creativity, socially constructed change, change leadership, sense making, complex responsive processes, emotions and aesthetics of change. 

Strategy & Leadership

Taking a view that, in practice, strategy is something that people do rather than something organisations have, this class aims to develop understanding and insights into how current and aspiring business leaders can manage strategically. An experiential learning approach, based on exploring case examples through workshops, is adopted to:

  • surface insights into the complexities and challenges of being a strategic business leader
  • critically assess the scope and relative merits of different strategic management mechanisms and leadership approaches 
  • encourage self-reflection and self-awareness
When you complete this class, you'll have an enhanced understanding of how individuals within an organisation can effectively lead and manage strategy in a complex and challenging world.
Being an Ethical Manager

Given the increased attention on business leaders and the perceived emphasis on corporate social responsibility, this class looks at ethical leadership by focusing on the nature and application of business ethics and contemporary leadership. It raises key ethical issues from both cultural and stakeholder perspectives and balances them with philosophical and pragmatic considerations. It'll provide you with a clear understanding of the dichotomy between philosophical idealism and the pragmatic considerations of ethical leadership and the challenges of ethical decision making.    

Electronic Commerce

Electronic commerce has had a major impact on the management of organisations and the business environment in which technology is used. This class seeks to explore this growing area, and provide a critical appraisal of the relationship between electronic commerce, technology and business model that has been adopted.

The explores the inter-relationship that exists between a theoretically grounded understanding of technological adoption and the changes that have been created by electronic commerce.

Assessment

The majority of classes involve a final unseen exam which is normally at the end of the semester. This is usually supplemented by individual and/or group coursework.

In some cases, you can get exemption from the final exam if you achieve a specific mark for your coursework and satisfy attendance requirements. You’ll normally have one opportunity to be re-assessed for a failed class. For exams, this usually takes place during the summer.

Assessment methods are varied and also include business reports, case studies, essays, presentations, individual and group projects, learning journals and peer assessments.

Learning & teaching

Teaching is over two semesters in blocks of 12 weeks. Classes are taught through lectures, tutorials, and seminars alongside team-based projects, online materials, and interactive sessions.

External contributors from partnership corporate organisations are involved in teaching and/or assessment of student presentations.

The innovative and highly acclaimed Management Development Programme (MDP) is at the core of our undergraduate degrees in the Business School and comprises a series of classes which you take throughout Years 1 to 3.

You develop knowledge and skills in key areas of management, and team-working, communication and decision-making skills, all of which are highly sought-after by employers.

Major employers and alumni from all sectors are involved in the MDP, participating in group sessions, observing student presentations, and providing feedback. Organisations involved include Barclays, Deloitte, Procter & Gamble and Ernst & Young. In first year the best teams are selected to present to senior staff in one of the sponsoring organisations, and there are prizes for the best projects.

The programme builds your confidence and entrepreneurial capabilities, and promotes awareness of globalisation and ethical issues in personal and business decision-making. In Year 3, you develop your own pathway from internships, involvement with business projects, engagement in interdisciplinary activities and business clinics.  



Entry requirements

Minimum grades

Required subjects are indicated following minimum accepted grades.

Highers

1st sitting: AAAB or AABBB; 2nd sitting: AAABBB (English B, Maths National 5B/Intermediate 2; Higher Maths B for combinations with Finance)

A Levels

Minimum entry requirements: BBB (GCSE English Language B or Literature B; Maths GCSE B/A Level B for combinations with Finance)

Typical entry requirements: ABB (GCSE English Language B or Literature B; GCSE Maths B/A Level B for combinations with Finance)

International Baccalaureate

33 (no subject below 5 and including English SL5, Maths SL5/Maths Studies 5)

HNC/HND

Successful completion of relevant HNC/HND at first attempt with A passes in all graded Units.  Contact Business School Admissions for advice on entry to Year 2.

Irish Leaving Certificate

AAABBB at Higher level, including English and Maths

Required subjects
  • English: Higher level B
  • Maths: Ordinary level at B or Higher level at B for combinations with Finance
  • Maths for combinations with Mathematics & Statistics: Higher level A

Additional information

Advanced Highers

An Advanced Higher and a Higher are given equal credit and the grades for each qualification count towards the total grades required.

Deferred entry

Deferred entry not accepted.

Admission to Honours

All students will be admitted as potential Honours students. Students may exit with a Bachelor of Arts degree at the end of year three of the Honours programme if they have accumulated at least 360 credits and satisfied the appropriate specialisation requirements. For admission to the final year of the Honours course, a student must have qualified for the award of the Bachelor of Arts degree and achieved an approved standard of performance.

English language requirement

A pass in an English language qualification is normally required from applicants outside the UK whose first language is not English. The following provides information on the main qualifications considered for entry to the Business School undergraduate degree courses.

IELTS: Minimum overall band score of 6.5 (no individual test score below 5.5)

Widening access

We want to increase opportunities for people from every background. Strathclyde selects our students based on merit, potential and the ability to benefit from the education we offer. We look for more than just your grades. We consider the circumstances of your education and will make lower offers to certain applicants as a result.

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

International students

Find out entry requirements for your country.

Degree preparation course for international students

We offer international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for an undergraduate degree at Strathclyde the option of completing an Undergraduate Foundation year programme at the International Study Centre. To find out more about these courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future.

You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Fees & funding

How much will my course cost?

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Scotland/EU

  • 2017/18 - £1,820

Rest of UK

  • 2017/18 - £9,250

Bachelor degrees at Strathclyde will cost £9,250 a year, but the total amount payable will be capped at £27,750 for students on a four-year Bachelors programme. Students studying on integrated Masters degree programmes – for example MSci, MEng and MPharm – will pay £9,250 for the Masters year.

International

  • 2017/18 - £13,500

Additional fees

Business Analysis & Technology 

Course materials & costs

There is no charge for course materials.

Placement & field trips

For students working on their final project, travel costs are usually met by clients. On the rare occasions where travel costs are not met by the client, student costs will depend on location and frequency of travel.

Management 

Course materials & costs

Essential textbooks for the course cost approximately £200 per year. There will also be a minimum of two copies per textbook available in the main library.

Other costs

Students are responsible for the costs of printing and binding of the undergraduate final project. Costs are approximately £50.

Graduation fee and gown hire are also to be met by students.

Please note: All fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my studies?

Students from Scotland and the EU

If you're a Scottish or EU student, you may be able to apply to the Student Award Agency Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government. Scottish students may also be eligible for a bursary and loan to help cover living costs while at University.

For more information on funding your studies have a look at our University Funding page.

Students from England, Wales & Northern Ireland

We have a generous package of bursaries on offer for students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales

Careers

Business Analysis & Technology

The best performing companies look for very high levels of problem-solving ability, numeracy, technology, business awareness and teamwork in their new employees. Business Analysis & Technology delivers this to a much greater extent than many other courses in business and management.

A significant number of well-known companies specifically target graduates from Strathclyde Business School, and from the area of management science in particular. Companies employing our graduates include:

  • consultancy companies such as Accenture Consulting, PA Consulting and Capgemini
  • financial services providers such as The Royal Bank of Scotland, Standard Life and Goldman Sachs
  • consumer goods companies such as Procter & Gamble and Unilever
  • supermarkets such as Tesco and Morrisons
  • other companies including British Airways, Scottish Power, BT, BAE Systems and public sector organisations such as the NHS

Job titles vary and may include Business Consultant, Business Analyst, Operations Manager and Risk Manager.

Management

The Management degree is designed to produce high-calibre graduates who are in high demand in the employment market.

As a Management graduate, you’ll have a strong understanding of business structure with the ability to analyse and use business data and information. Your commercial awareness will be valued by a wide range of employers across all industries.

You're as likely to find yourself working in a small, privately-owned company as a large multinational, the public sector or perhaps even in your own business. For example, recent graduates are now working for Ernst and Young, The Royal Bank of Scotland, Lloyds, Hewlett Packard and Proctor & Gamble, with job titles such as graduate sales trainee, logistics manger and business development manager.

Contact us

Apply

How to apply – 10 things you need to know

  1. All undergraduate applications are made through UCAS
    Go to the UCAS website to apply – you can apply for up to five courses.
  2. It costs £12 to apply for a course
    The cost is £23 for two to five courses.
  3. The deadline is 15 January each year
    This is the application deadline for most courses. However, please check the details for your particular course. View a full list of UCAS key dates.
  4. You might be asked to attend an interview
    Most of our courses make offers based on the UCAS application. However some might ask you to attend an interview or for a portfolio of work. If this is the case, this will be stated in the prospectus entry requirements.
  5. It’s possible to apply directly to Year 2
    Depending on your qualifications, you might be able to apply directly to Year 2 - or even Year 3 - of a course. Speak to the named contact for your course if you want to discuss this.
  6. There’s three types of decision
    • unconditional – you’ve already met our entry requirements
    • conditional – we’ll offer you a place if you meet certain conditions, usually based on your exams
    • unsuccessful – we’ve decided not to offer you a place
  7. You need to contact UCAS to accept your offer
    Once you’ve decided which course you’d like to accept, you must let UCAS know. You don’t need to decide until you’ve received all offers. UCAS will give you a deadline you must respond by.

    You’ll choose one as your firm choice. If the offer is unconditional or if you meet the conditions, this is the course you’ll study.

    You’ll also have an insurance choice. This is a back-up option if you don’t meet the conditions of your first choice.
  8. You don’t need to send us your exam results (Scotland, England & Wales)
    If you’re studying in Scotland, England or Wales, we receive a copy of your Higher/Advanced Higher/A Level results directly from the awarding body. However, if you are studying a different qualification, then please contact us to arrange to send your results directly.
  9. We welcome applications from international students

    Find out further information about our entry and English language requirements.

    International students who don’t meet the entry requirements, can apply for our pre-undergraduate programmes.

    There’s also an online application form.

    For further information:
  10. Here’s a really useful video to help you apply

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