MSc/PgDip/PgCert Advanced Science

Key facts

  • Start date: September
  • Application deadline: August
  • Study mode and duration: modules delivered on-line, blended (on-line and on-campus study) or on campus study, maximum 60 months duration, part-time study
  • Eligibility: all academic backgrounds considered but some modules may require subject specific qualifications

Study with us

  • undertake single 10, 20 or 40 credit modules from our MSc programmes' module range
  • modules can be taken either stand-alone for CPD purposes or as part of a programme of study working towards a PG Certificate, PG Diploma or MSc award
  • have the option of choosing to a specialist subject e.g. Biomolecular Science, Chemical Sciences, Computer and Information Science, Mathematics and Statistics or Physics by selecting 50% of classes from the subject
  • UK University of the Year 2019 (Times Higher Education Awards)

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Back to course

Why this course?

The Professional Development - Flexible Modular Study route enables students to undertake single 10, 20 or 40 credit modules from our MSc programme module range. Modules can be taken either stand-alone for CPD purposes or as part of a programme of study working towards a PG Certificate, PG Diploma or MSc award.

Modules can be delivered on-line, using a blended approach (on line and on-campus attendance) or on-campus attendance classes. Some modules require students to pass a pre-requisite class.

When you apply to the non-graduating route you’ll select your first module and arrange payment of the tuition fees (set per individual module). Some classes require pre-requisites or a specific degree subject background, while others are open to students from any degree background, opening a route to progress your career within science.

Two students studying together

THE Awards 2019: UK University of the Year Winner

What you’ll study 

Modules can be selected from a pool provided by the five Departments within the Science Faculty and cover topics within Biomolecular Science, Chemistry, Computer and Information Science, Mathematics and Statistics, and Physics. Each module is taught over 10-12 weeks and requires approximately 2-3 hours of study per week. (120 credits) 

Students will have the option of choosing to a specialist subject e.g. Biomolecular Science, Chemical Sciences, Computer & Information Science, Mathematics & Statistics or Physics by selecting 50% of their classes from the subject. These credits can be used to build up to a Masters in Advanced Science. 

  • MSc in Advanced Science: no fewer than 180 credits including a dissertation
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Science Studies: no fewer than 120 credits
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Science Studies: no fewer than 60 credits

For the Masters there are two compulsory modules:

  • Professional Development: Review, Reflection and Planning (20 credits, on-line delivery)
  • Advanced Science Research Project module (on-line and project completed in the workplace: 60 credits)

Work placement

Students are expected to complete their 40 credit research project whilst in the workplace in collaboration with their employer. 

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Course content

Many students choose to take just one or two modules for CPD purposes. If you successfully complete a module, you’ll have the option either to receive a course completion document and end your studies, or you may be able to continue to build up credit towards the award of a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc degree (over a maximum period of five years).

Individual classes are 10 or 20 credit classes; you need to pass three classes to qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, six classes for a Postgraduate Diploma and add a final individual research project for degree award of an MSc. Students can specialise in a particular Science discipline by selecting modules from this discipline i.e. Biomolecular Science, Chemistry Computing and Information Science, Mathematics and Statistics or Physics.

Classes have either a September (Semester 1) or January (Semester 2) start date – please contact Dr K. C. Carter (k.carter@strath.ac.uk) if you'd like to know more.

Semester 1 or 2

Professional Development: Review, Reflection and Planning (20 credits)

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Identify their current skill set and give specific examples to demonstrate this skill in their current position,
  • Critically interpret data and develop conclusions or hypotheses based on their findings,
  • Identify their education/skill needs to improve their employment opportunities

Assessment: Continuous assessment

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Katharine Carter

Advanced Science Research Project (60 credits)

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Carry out original research
  • Critically interpret data and develop conclusions or hypotheses based on their findings
  • Analyse and present their data
  • Provide Masters levels knowledge in a key area that is relevant to the career aspirations of the student

Assessment: Thesis based on project/case study (100%)

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Katharine Carter

Biomolecular science

Chemical and statistical analysis: principles and application (20 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to:

  1. Describe in the context of pharmaceutical analysis, the principles and application of method validation (accuracy, precision, robustness, reproducibility and repeatability) in the analysis of drugs and other related substances.
  2. Describe in the context of pharmaceutical analysis, the key functional groups; physicochemical properties and issues related to stability (or instability) of drugs and other related substances.
  3. Demonstrate a critical understanding/analysis of experimental data, ability to use appropriate calculations in the quantitative determination of drugs and other related substances.
  4. Demonstrate and integrated knowledge and critical understanding of the principles and application of the qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis (titrimetry) of drugs and other related substances.
  5. Demonstrate an integrated knowledge base and critical understanding of the application of statistical methods (experimental design, method and sample size selection and regression analysis) in the development and production of pharmaceutical products.
  6. Demonstrate critical understanding/analysis of experimental and clinical data, ability to select the right statistical method for a given study and understanding of graphical and numerical summaries of data sets.
  7. Describe in the context of pharmaceutical analysis, the principles and application of chemometrics in the analysis of drugs and other related substances.

Assessment: Coursework and final exam

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr David Breen

Chemical and spectroscopic methods (20 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to:

  1. Understand how to perform titrimetric analysis of pharmaceutical compounds in both the pure state and in formulations.
  2. Understand the operation of commonly used spectroscopic analytical equipment (i.e. UV Spectrophotometers, IR spectrophotometers) including their calibration.
  3. Understand the use of UV spectrophotometers in quantitative applications on both pure compounds and formulated products. Understand the use of vibrational spectrophotometry in structural elucidation and assay of formulated products.

Assessment: Coursework and practical exam

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Professor Yvonne Perrie

Crystalisation and formulation for manufacture (20 credits)

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Steven Ford

Targeted cancer therapies for personalised medicines (20 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to:

  1. explain the principles of cancer biology, its molecular pathology and phenotype.
  2. understand how the molecular nature of different cancers can be used to allow personalised cancer therapy.

Assessment: Coursework

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Marie Boyd

Health Service Skills (20 credits)

On completion of the class students will be able to:

  1. Describe the different types of health services research and how these inform Pharmacy Practice.
  2. Describe the key concepts in quantitative and qualitative methodologies.
  3. Review, interpret and critically appraise a clinical (research) paper
  4. Outline a research proposal in an area of their own interest.
  5. Recognize and apply appropriate statistical tests on different research questions and datasets.

Assessment:

Formative. Presentation of a research protocol based upon a topic of the students choosing (developed across the duration of the class) in Week 12.

Summative.

1. Analysis of a quantitative data set given earlier in the class with submission in week 10 [50%]

2. A 2.5hr exam where students interpret and critically analyse a clinical research paper in week 13 [50%]

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Gazala Akram

Bioprocessing (20 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to understand the:

  • basic principles of bioprocessing including process kinetics
  • importance of and mechanisms for strain/cell line stability and preservation
  • importance of medium design, bioreactor design and operation
  • principles of mass transfer and its relationship to the success of bioprocesses
  • principles of good manufacturing practice and its relevance to regulatory issues
  • skills in data/paper interpretation and writing

Assessment: Continuous assessment - written assignment (80%) and in-class contribution (20%)

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Martin Weise

Core Neuroscience (10 credits)

Upon completion of the class students will have:

  1. a critical understanding of the structures and functions of neurons and other cells in the nervous system
  2. a critical understanding of the generation, propagation and use of membrane potentials by neurons; and will be able to apply that understanding to the study of related/advanced topics
  3. a detailed and critical knowledge of the principles underlying synaptic transmission and the major classes of neurotransmitters
  4. an extensive understanding of the interaction of the brain with the rest of the body via sensory, motor, autonomic and vascular systems; and will be able to critically review forefront developments in understanding the nervous system
  5. a critical awareness of how the nervous system develops to form networks and circuits with regional and interacting functions

Assessment: 30% in class assessment (online MCQ plus problem-solving and drag-and-drop diagram questions); 70% final assessment (online SAQs)

Prerequisites: minimum 2:2 BSc (Hons) degree or equivalent in biological science or related subject

Contact for further information: Dr Shuzo Sakata or Dr Susan Chalmers

Functions of the Nervous System (20 credits)

Upon completion of the class students will:

  1. develop a critical understanding of the core concepts in cognition: learning, memory, attention and perception
  2. have an extensive understanding of the functional structure of sensory systems and how cognition shapes perceptions
  3. have a detailed and critical understanding of the functional structure of motor systems and how decision making happens
  4. have a detailed knowledge of the mechanisms of behavioural state control
  5. be able to demonstrate their critical understanding of research techniques used in studying functional neuroscience and demonstrate a critical awareness of the ethics of in vivo experimentation; they will be able to communicate and apply this knowledge (in workshops and assessments)

Assessment: 50% in class assessment (time-limited essay); 50% final assessment (online LO-based SAQ-style assessments)

Prerequisites: BM950 Core Neuroscience (plus minimum 2:2 BSc (Hons) degree or equivalent in biological science or related subject)

Contact for further information: Dr Morag Faqhuar or Dr Susan Chalmers

Disorders of the Nervous System (20 credits)

Upon completion of the class students will:

  1. develop an in-depth understanding of common childhood CNS disorders such as autism and childhood epilepsies
  2. appreciate recent advances in understanding the aetiology of affective disorders such as depression and how these underlie the neuropsychiatric pathology and the pharmacological approaches to treatment
  3. understand the role of inflammation and other key pathological processes such as protein aggregation in the development of disorders of the nervous system
  4. develop a detailed understanding of the aetiology, pathology and treatment of selected neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease
  5. develop a critical understanding of how vascular disease can impact brain health and the development of CNS disorders such as stroke

Assessment: 50% in class assessment (of which 50% is oral presentation and 50% is an essay); 50% final assessment (online LO-based SAQ plus essay questions)

Prerequisites: BM950 Core Neuroscience and BM948 Functions of the Nervous System – latter can be taken as a co-requisite (plus minimum 2:2 BSc (Hons) degree or equivalent in biological science or related subject)

Contact for further information: Dr Susan Chalmers

Chemistry

Essentials of Forensic Science: Theoretical (20 credits)

The ‘Essentials of Forensic Science: Theoretical’ class is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to forensic science on which they can build more specialist knowledge. From the recovery of evidence at a crime scene, to presenting evidence at court, this class introduces the practice of forensic science and a wide range of evidence types. 

Students will learn about different legal systems, quality assurance and the ethical considerations of forensic science within the context of the law. 

This class explores the assessment, analysis and interpretation of evidence, including Bayesian statistical approaches, and students will be encouraged to evaluate the evidence in an investigative setting.

Assessment: Examination

Prerequisites: BSc in related science subject

Contact for further information: Dr Laura Reaney

Process Analytical Technology & Quality by Design in Continuous Pharmaceutical Manufacturing

This class will also provide insight into the key principles of QbD covering quality risk management, formal experimental design and PAT, including topics such as: PAT tools and Implementation; PAT in Development and Manufacturing; Design of Experiments and Multivariate Data Analysis; Quality by Design (QbD)

Computer & information science

Legal, Ethical and Professional Issues for the Information Society (10 credits)

On completion of the class students will be able to:

  • appreciate the characteristics of professionalism as it relates to modern data management
  • recognise and appreciate the professional aspects of other engineering and related classes in their curriculum, and how those aspects influence practice
  • form a sound basis on which they will subsequently be able to practise Information Systems Engineering with a due regard for legal, ethical and social issues

Assessment: Attendance (contributions to discussions) 25%, an individual assignment (50%) and a group assignment (25%)

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr David McMenemy

Big Data Fundamentals (10 credits)

After completing this module participants will be able to:

  • understand the fundamentals of Python to enable the use of various big data technologies;
  • understand how classical statistical techniques are applied in modern data analysis;
  • understand the potential application of data analysis tools for various problems and appreciate their limitations

Assessment: Coursework

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Martin Harvey

Big Data Tools and Techniques (10 credits)

After completing this module participants will be familiar with:

  • a number of different cloud NoSQL systems and their design and implementation, showing how they can achieve efficiency and scalability while also addressing design trade-offs and their impacts;
  • the Map-Reduce programming paradigm

Assessment: Final examination

Prerequisites: Big Data Fundamentals module

Contact for further information: Dr Yasher Moshfeghi

Health Information Governance (10 credits)

On completion of the module students will:

  • Appreciate the characteristics of modern health data management.
  • Be able to form a sound basis on which to practise within the digital health and care space with a due regard for legal, ethical, and social issues.
  • Recognise and appreciate the professional aspects of other health and care classes within the curriculum, and how those aspects influence practice.

Assessment: Individual assignments (50%) and group project (50%)

Prerequisites: Big Data Fundamentals module

Contact for further information: Dr David McMenemy

Introduction to Programming Principles (10 credits)

On completion of this class students will understand and be able to use:

  • main control and flow structures of an imperative programming language
  • simple data elements and basic data structures of an imperative programming language
  • the main code structure constructs of an imperative programming language

Assessment: Individual lab test (50%) and Individual coursework assignment (50%)

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Konstantinos Liaskos

Object Oriented Programming (20 credits)

On completion of this module students will be able to understand and:

  • use objects in common object-oriented languages
  • develop programs using class based object-oriented programming
  • develop programs using template based object-oriented programming

Assessment: Individual lab test (50%) and Individual coursework assignment (50%)

Prerequisites: Introduction to Programming Principles module

Contact for further information: Konstantinos Liaskos

Database Fundamentals (10 credits)

On completion of this class students will be able to:

  • display knowledge of the process of designing a database system, starting from an informal specification
  • display skill in formulating database queries using SQL
  • show an appreciation of the facilities and services which should be provided by a fully featured database management system
  • demonstrate knowledge of commonly occurring data models
  • demonstrate experience of using a relational database management system in a client-server environment
  • display knowledge of potential future developments in database technology

Assessment: Individual assignments worth 50% and a 1-hour written examination worth 50%

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr John Wilson

Information Retrieval (10 credits)

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • critically examine a number of influential information seeking models
  • demonstrate an understanding of research methodologies for studying human information behaviour
  • demonstrate an advanced understanding of important concepts, such as relevance, in the context of information seeking and retrieval
  • to show how findings from information seeking theory and practice can inform the design of information access systems
  • demonstrate an advanced understanding of the theory and technology used to construct modern Information Retrieval and Information Access systems
  • demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate the assumptions behind the evaluation of Information Retrieval systems

Assessment: Final examination (two hours)

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Marin Harvey

Security Fundamentals (10 credits)

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • understand and explain the algorithms behind a number of different cryptographic and communication solutions
  • understand and explain a range of different security protocols
  • evaluate and existing or proposed system in terms of potential vulnerabilities and recommend the most appropriate security solution to apply
  • summarise the key vulnerabilities, threats and attacks with regards to network security and propose suitable approaches to mitigate these issues

Assessment: Coursework assignment (40%) and examination (2 hours)

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Shishir Nagaraja

Physics

Introductory Nanoscience (20 credits)

On successful completion of this class, the student will:

  1. Have knowledge of the concepts and terminology relating to nanoparticles, quantum dots and other low dimensional nanostructures.
  2. Show an appreciation of modern methods of production for nanoparticles and nanostructures.
  3. Have knowledge of the chemical and physical characteristics of nanoparticles and nanostructures, including Surface Plasmon Resonances and fluorescence characteristics.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic spectroscopy and microscopy techniques, associated with characterization of nanoparticles and nanostructures.
  5. Have knowledge of how nanoparticle size and shape affect the physical, chemical and spectroscopic properties of a nanoparticle.
  6. Be able to compare and contrast the properties of nanoparticles of different materials.
  7. Have knowledge of the definition of and basic physical and chemical properties of other forms of nanomaterials such as carbon nanostructures.
  8. Appreciate the applications for nanomaterials in modern science and technology, particularly in relation to physics, chemistry and medicine.
  9. Show a basic knowledge of the issues relating to nanotoxicity and the ethical issues surrounding the use of nanoparticles in medicine.

Assessment: 80% of level 4 components (80% of final EXAM and 20% in class assessments); 20% level 5 essay

Prerequisites: Quantum physics

Contact for further information: Dr Yu Chen

Mathematics & statistics

Online modules

Foundations of Probability & Statistics

The course and thus this introductory class is aimed at graduates who have not previously studied statistics at university level. The class will provide the foundation elements of probability and statistics that are required for the more advanced classes studied later on.

Data Analytics in R

This class will introduce the R computing environment and enable you to import data and perform statistical tests. The class will then focus on the understanding of the least squares multiple regression model, general linear model, transformations and variable selection procedures.

Biomolecular science

Design and development of anticancer drugs (10 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to:

  1. Analyse experimental data sets 
  2. Interpreting data in the context of biological understanding, and come to an informed decision on your next research and development steps 

Assessment: Coursework

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Marie Boyd

Chromatography: principles, application and method development (20 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to:

  1. Describe in the context of pharmaceutical analysis, the principles and application of chromatography in the analysis of drugs and other related substances.
  2. Demonstrate an integrated knowledge and critical understanding of the principles and application of the qualitative and quantitative chromatographic methods (including hyphenated techniques) for the analysis of drugs and other related substances.
  3. Describe in the context of pharmaceutical analysis, the key functional groups; physicochemical properties and issues related to the retention and the chromatographic separation of drugs and other related substances.
  4. Demonstrate a critical understanding/analysis of experimental data, ability to use appropriate calculations in the quantitative determination of drugs and other related substances.
  5. Demonstrate an integrated knowledge base and critical understanding of the application of the principles of chromatography in the design, development and optimisation of chromatographic methods for the quantitative determination of drugs and related substances.

Assessment: Coursework and final exam

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr David Breen

Bio-analysis, biotechnology and quality management (20 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to:

  1. Describe the guidelines used to ensure the quality of medicines.
  2. Describe the role of the Pharmacopoeias in ensuring the quality of medicines.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the different sections of a pharmacopoeial monograph.
  4. Describe the major techniques used to control the quality of biologically derived drugs.
  5. Describe the methods used to extract drugs from biological matrices.
  6. Describe how mass spectrometry is used for the assay of drugs in biological matrices.
  7. Describe how a bioanalytical method for a particular drug structure might be carried out.

Assessment: Coursework and final exam

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr David Breen

Radiobiology and radiation oncology: from beam to bedside (20 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to explain the:

  • current clinical modes of radiotherapy and the emerging technologies most likely to provide the next generation of radiotherapy methods such as proton and radiopharmaceutical therapies
  • cellular effect of radiation including the strengths and limitation of different radiation methods
  • therapeutic use of combination treatment with radiation and chemotherapy or other therapeutic methods such as nanoparticles or biological therapies

Assessment: Coursework

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Marie Boyd

Novel Therapeutics and biopharmaceuticals (20 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to:

  1. explain medicinal chemistry principles and know what is a "drug" and how to develop one
  2. understand the importance of ADMET and PK in drug development
  3. explain the key issues in formulation and delivery in novel drug development
  4. explain what are emerging biopharmaceuticals and biosimilars

Assessment: Continuous assessment

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Professor Yvonne Perrie

Advanced drug delivery and nanotechnology (20 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to:

  1. Critically discuss emerging new technologies for drug delivery.
  2. Apply their understanding of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion to a reasoned explanation for a particular choice of drug delivery system.
  3. Understand the rationale for the use of nanomedicines and their design principles using selected examples.
  4. Critically discuss the use and selection of biodegradable polymers and liposomes in the formulation of sustained release products.
  5. Critically discuss the advances that have been made in gene therapy and the challenges that lie ahead.
  6. Explain the rationale underpinning the current technologies applied to the delivery of proteins.

Assessment: Examination (80%), coursework (20%)

Prerequisites: BSc Hons in PharmaceuticalScience (2:2) or equivalent

Contact for further information: Professor Yvonne Perrie

Continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical particles and products (20 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to understand crystallisation fundamentals and technologies for pharmaceuticals.

Assessment: Examination (70%) and Individual Coursework (30%)

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Steven Ford

Design and development of anticancer drugs (10 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to:

  1. Analyse experimental data sets.
  2. Interpret data in the context of biological understanding, and come to an informed decision on your next research and development steps.

Assessment: Coursework

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Marie Boyd

Drug discovery and development in cancer (20 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to:

  1. Explain what is meant by a 'drug'  is and how to develop one by understanding the importance of ADMET and PK in drug development.
  2. Explain the key overriding issues in cancer drug formulation and delivery and how these are important for understanding of the cancer drug discovery pipeline.

Assessment: Coursework

Prerequisites: None

Contact for further information: Dr Steven Ford

Applied biocatalysis (20 credits)

On successful completion of this class the student will be able to explain:

  • the types of catalyst and reaction system that are included under applied biocatalysis, and the diffuse boundary with fermentation processes
  • the key properties required in a practical biocatalyst: activity, specificity, stability
  • the meaning of biocatalyst activity and specific activity, and how to calculate them
  • the usual real advantages of biocatalysis: specificity, mild conditions, environmental and safety factors
  • that some other claimed advantages of biocatalysis are usually not real, especially high rates – and that there are significant disadvantages
  • that research, development and application of biocatalysis is a highly interdisciplinary field, with key contributions from molecular biology, biochemistry, microbiology, synthetic chemistry, physical chemistry, process engineering and business

Contact for further information: Dr Martin Weise

Pharmaceutical Project Management
The aim of this class is to impart knowledge and understanding of the Pharmaceutical Project management keeping in view of pharmaceutical, biotech and industry in mind. This class will provide you with the fundamentals of project management and show how to apply the principles of project management to a typical pharmaceutical project, including topic such as: Pharmaceutical R&D and Business Processes; Project Planning; Project Management of Chemical, Analytical, and Formulation Development; Operations management, Processes and production; Marketing & Entrepreneurship”

Chemistry Semester 1 & 2

Advanced Nanoscience 3: Chemical and Biomedical Nanoscience (20 credits)

The aim of this course is to introduce the advanced use of functionalised nanoparticles and techniques associated with them for characterisation and deployment. In addition to functionalised nanoparticles, functionalised surfaces in terms of nano-patterning and their characterisation and application will also be delivered to the class. The emphasis behind the whole series of lectures will be on the underlying chemistry coupled with the nanoscience relevancy in terms of modern day applications.

Assessment: Examination

Prerequisites: BSc in Chemistry or Physics

Contact for further information: Dr Alastair Wark

Computer & information science

Mobile Application Development (20 credits)

On completion of this module students will be able to understand:

  • the special nature of mobile application development
  • and develop graphical user interfaces for mobile applications
  • networking requirements/challenges for mobile application development,  and understand and develop solutions
  • the fundamentals of usability for mobile development and run usability testing studies.

Assessment: Individual lab test (20%); Individual Coursework Assignment (30%); and Group Project (50%)

Prerequisites: Introduction to Programming Principles and Object Oriented Programming modules

Contact for further information: Konstantinos Liaskos

Database Development (10 credits)

On completion of this class students will be able to:

  • display knowledge of declarative versus procedural approaches to access databases and the relative benefits/costs associated with each
  • display skill to construct complex SQL queries
  • demonstrate ability to utilise triggers / stored procedures within a commercial database management platform
  • understand how to appropriately embed SQL queries within other programming languages and environments
  • display an appreciation for the importance of database indexing in the context of supporting complex queries on ‘big data’
  • display knowledge of transactional processes within database systems and understand their relevance to code design and execution

Assessment: Individual assignments worth 60% and a one hour written examination worth 40%

Prerequisites: Database fundamentals module

Contact for further information: Professor Crawford Revie

Business Analysis (10 credits)

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • communicate and apply principles of good business analysis practice
  • select tools and techniques for the analysis and design of business information systems
  • undertake business analysis as part of system development
  • undertake business process modelling and design

Assessment: Individual assignment (50%) and a group assignment (50%)

Prerequisites: Database fundamentals module

Contact for further information: Dr Martin Harvey

Mathematics & statistics

Online modules

Medical Statistics

This class will cover the fundamental statistical methods necessary for the application of classical statistical methods to data collected for health care research. There will be an emphasis on the use of real data and the interpretation of statistical analyses in the context of the research hypothesis under investigation. Software packages such as Minitab will be introduced.

Learning and Teaching

Each module will be delivered in a way that is appropriate for the content and whether it is delivered on-line, on campus or using a blended approach. All modules will use Myplace, our virtual on-line environment, which will give specific details on the module.

Assessment

The type of assessment used will depend on the module but it it will include in-class assessments e.g. essays type, on-line assessments or traditional examinations. These will be specified in the module descriptors.

Facilities

Some modules offered will involve training on specialised equipment.  These will be specified in the module descriptor. You can find out more about each Department on the Faculty of Science postgraduate page

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Our campus is based in the very heart of Glasgow, Scotland's largest city. National Geographic named Glasgow as one of its 'Best of the World' destinations, while Rough Guide readers have voted Glasgow the world’s friendliest city! And Time Out named Glasgow in the top ten best cities in the world - we couldn't agree more!

We're in the city centre, next to the Merchant City, both of which are great locations for sightseeing, shopping and socialising alongside your studies.

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Entry requirements

Some modules require a science degree in a specific discipline appropriate to the module. Other modules are suitable for all science degree backgrounds, including, Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Information Science and Computing, Mathematics and Statistics and Physics.

Lower degree classifications may be accepted if there is strength elsewhere (for example, relevant work experience, excellent final project/dissertation, very strong academic letter of reference, very strong application statement linking with career goals).

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Fees & funding

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Scotland

£800 per 10 credit module

Rest of UK

£800 per 10 credit module

Please note: The fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my course?

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Scottish and non-UK EU postgraduate students

Scottish and non-UK EU postgraduate students may be able to apply for support from the Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS). The support is in the form of a tuition fee loan and for eligible students, a living cost loan. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

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Students coming from England

Students ordinarily resident in England may be to apply for postgraduate support from Student Finance England. The support is a loan of up to £10,280 which can be used for both tuition fees and living costs. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

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Students coming from Wales

Students ordinarily resident in Wales may be to apply for postgraduate support from Student Finance Wales. The support is a loan of up to £10,280 which can be used for both tuition fees and living costs. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

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Students coming from Northern Ireland

Postgraduate students who are ordinarily resident in Northern Ireland may be able to apply for support from Student Finance Northern Ireland. The support is a tuition fee loan of up to £5,500. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

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Careers

The modules offered can be used to improve a student’s knowledge at a Masters levels in a particular science discipline or help a student transition into a new scinec discipline. The compulsory model on the Masters curriculum, ‘Professional Development: Review, Reflection and Planning’ will help students identify what further study would be most appropriate for a student’s career path.

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Advanced Science (online)

Qualification: PG Certificate
Start Date: Sep 2021
Mode of Attendance: part-time

Advanced Science (on campus)

Qualification: PG Certificate
Start Date: Sep 2021
Mode of Attendance: part-time

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Contact us

PGT Admissions Team

Telephone: +44 (0)141 574 5147

Email: science-masters@strath.ac.uk