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Railway bridge over Loch Awe, in Argyll and Bute.

MLitt/PgDip/PgCertLiterature, Culture & Place

Why this course?

This course allows graduates with first degrees in literature, cultural studies, or related areas to take their studies to a more specialised level or in an entirely new direction. The MLitt in Literature, Culture and Place focuses on the way literary and cultural texts both shape and respond to the notion of place, exploring literary and theoretical approaches from a variety of contexts in the literature of modernity.

The course is unique in the UK. It combines a broad range of periods and places. You’ll use rare local resources, such as:

Teaching staff

Specialist expertise is provided by teaching staff from the School of Humanities.

Course content

Compulsory classes

Research Skills
The research skills class develops skills which are essential for work on the MLitt dissertation and for later doctoral research and careers outside academia, such as publishing or research work. The class examines what it means to do research, how to prepare a research proposal, and what examiners look for in dissertations and theses. Part of the this class also involves a series of seminars on key aspects of place and literature, designed as an introduction to the work and working practices of specialists in the school whose work connects with the Centre for Literature, Culture and Place.
Dissertation (MLitt only)
You must complete a 15,000 word dissertation, which will account for 60 credits towards their MLitt degree. The dissertation is intended to test your capacity to devise and carry out an independent research project. You will receive some individual supervision, but the planning, research and writing of the dissertation is fundamentally your own responsibility. The dissertation offers you the opportunity further to explore issues of particular interest to you that you have encountered during the course. Dissertations should seek to make a scholarly contribution to the literary, historical and theoretical areas of enquiry that make up the MLitt in Literature, Culture and Place.

Elective classes

Choose five from this list

Visions of Suburbia: Interdisciplinary Representations, 1850 to 2000

This class examines the impact that the development of suburban spaces has had on a range of literary and cultural genres.

In the period 1850-2000, suburbia came to dominate both the physical and imaginary landscapes of Britain. It produced new configurations of space (the suburban villa), new forms of community ('neighbourhood watch') and new social stereotypes (the 'desperate housewives'). We will consider how these developments intersected with the form and content of contemporary literature, cinema, music and journalism by focusing on a series of key historical moments. Throughout we will maintain an interdisciplinary approach that seeks to uncover the mutual influences between the arts and the built environment, for example by tracing the influence of literary works on political, artistic and architectural writing on suburbia.

British Places: Literature 1880 to 1950

This class studies the changing representation of national culture in literature in the British Isles in the first half of the twentieth century. The class aims to enhance the general themes of the MLitt in Literature, Culture and Place by investigating the way nation and place are constructed in literature at times of national emergency - during, in the particular cases studied here, two world wars, the agricultural depression of the 1880s, the industrial slump of the 1930s, and the emergence of Scottish and Irish nationalism. 

Global Queers: Travel Writing and Sexual Politics

This class is designed to engage students with recent research on sexuality in a global context. This continues to be a controversial topic with key global institutions and organisations from churches to the UN being unable to forge an internal consensus about the protection and acceptance of LGBTQ lives. Through looking at non-fiction writing, this class will introduce students to key issue in the field through the perspective of writers who travel across real and gender/sexual border and boundaries. 

Introduction to Intercultural Communication

This class applies the linguistic theory of communication and theoretical approaches to interculturality to a range of problems in intercultural communication which are relevant in the teaching of English to speakers of other language. We look at interculturalism, communication, the language of interaction, contexts for communication, language and contact, multiple languages, the intercultural industry, and identity and difference.

Narrative Processing across Languages and Cultures

Narrative processing is a field which has seen significant advances in recent years in psychology and neuroscience (eg Zwaan, situation models), and narratology (e.g. Ryan and transmedia narrative). These bodies of research converge on the many ways in which narratives across cultures and media can be seen to share universal features.

However, there is an even older body of work, deriving ultimately from Bartlett's memory studies and developing through folklore and anthropology, which illustrates how narratives meaning and interpretation changes as it moves between social settings as well as media and cultures (Bauman, Barber).

This class will invite students to engage with these three approaches critically and to form views on their implications for the use of narratives between cultural groups, and to consider potential practical applications for their findings.

Transcultural Fandom and British Popular Culture

Fan studies is a very rapidly growing new discipline, and fan cultures are becoming increasingly visible both in academic scholarship and in wider popular culture. For teachers of English language, a knowledge of the writing and reading practices of fanfiction communities - practices that very often include translating works from English into multiple other languages, and vice versa - can feed directly into classroom engagement with new uses of English in intercultural communication. Moreover, focusing on internationally known works of British literature and their transformations in global circulation will enable critical reflection on the use of British culture in teaching English language.

Entry requirements

First- or upper second-class Honours degree, or equivalent in English Literature or a related subject.

English language requirements

You're required to have a suitable minimum level of competency in the English language if your first language is not English or if you have not been educated wholly or mainly in the medium of English.

For postgraduate studies, the University of Strathclyde requires a minimum overall score of IELTS 6.5 (no individual test score below 5.5) or equivalent. Tests are valid for two years.

Pre-sessional courses in English are available.

If you’re a national of an English speaking country recognised by UK Visa and Immigrations (please check most up-to-date list on the Home Office website) or you have successfully completed an academic qualification (at least equivalent to a UK bachelor's degree) in any of these countries, then you do not need to present any additional evidence.

If you are from a country not recognised as an English speaking country by the United Kingdom Vis and Immigration (UKVI), please check our English requirements before making your application.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course held at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre, for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

Upon successful completion, you will be able to progress to this degree course at the University of Strathclyde.

Fees & funding

2018/19

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Scotland/EU

  • MLitt - £8,350
  • PgDip - £5,750
  • PgCert - £2,875

Rest of UK

  • MLitt - £8,350
  • PgDip - £5,750
  • PgCert - £2,875

International

  • MLitt - £14,050
  • PgDip - £9,350
  • PgCert - £4,675

How can I fund my course?

To recognise academic achievement, the Dean's International Excellence Award offers students a merit-based scholarship of up to £3,000 for entry onto a full-time Masters programme in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Check our Scholarship Search for more help with fees and funding.

How can I fund my course?

Check our Scholarship Search for more help with fees and funding.

For all Strathclyde Business School postgraduate taught programmes:

Scottish and non-UK EU postgraduate students

Scottish and non-UK EU postgraduate students may be able to apply for support from the Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS). The support is in the form of a tuition fee loan and for eligible students, a living cost loan. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Students coming from England

Students ordinarily resident in England may be to apply for postgraduate support from Student Finance England. The support is a loan of up to £10,280 which can be used for both tuition fees and living costs. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Students coming from Wales

Students ordinarily resident in Wales may be to apply for postgraduate support from Student Finance Wales. The support is a loan of up to £10,280 which can be used for both tuition fees and living costs. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Students coming from Northern Ireland

Postgraduate students who are ordinarily resident in Northern Ireland may be able to apply for support from Student Finance Northern Ireland. The support is a tuition fee loan of up to £5,500. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

International students

We have a large range of scholarships available to help you fund your studies. Check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Strathclyde Alumni

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Alumni Discount

10% tuition fee discount is offered to all Strathclyde alumni completing a full-time postgraduate taught course in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Please note

The fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

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Literature, Culture and Place

Qualification: PG Diploma, Start date: Sep 2018, Mode of delivery: attendance, full-time

Literature, Culture and Place

Qualification: PG Certificate, Start date: Sep 2018, Mode of delivery: attendance, full-time

Literature, Culture and Place

Qualification: MLitt, Start date: Sep 2018, Mode of delivery: attendance, full-time

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