Myers Briggs Type Indicator

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The MBTI® (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) questionnaire provides a highly insightful framework for individual and group development, provoking self-awareness by looking at how a person perceives the world and how they prefer to interact with others.

The MBTI instrument sorts individuals into psychological 'types' so that they can identify how they are similar to some people and different to others, and how they can improve their working and personal relationships in a positive and constructive way.

MBTI® Step I

MBTI® Step I is a multiple-choice personality questionnaire that looks at how a person perceives the world and how they prefer to interact with others. The MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) framework helps people improve their working and personal relationships in a positive and constructive way.

Step I does this by identifying an individual's psychological 'type', made up of four basic preferences that are represented by the letters, E-I, S-N, T-F and J-P.

The Step I framework is based around four dimensions of personality. Within each dimension, personality will fall into one or other of two dichotomies: 

E-I: Where you prefer to get and focus your 'energy' or attention

Extraversion (E)
Prefers to draw energy from the outer world of activity, people and things.

OR

Introversion (I)
Prefers to draw energy from the inner world of reflections, feelings and ideas.

S-N: The kind of information you prefer to gather and trust

Sensing (S)
Prefers to focus on information gained from the five senses and on practical applications.

OR

iNtuition (N)
Prefers to focus on patterns, connections and possible meanings.

T-F: The process you prefer to use in evaluating information and coming to decisions

Thinking (T)
Prefers to base decisions on logic and objective analysis of cause and effect.

OR

Feeling (F)
Prefers to base decisions on a valuing process, considering what is important to people.

J-P: How you prefer to deal with the world around you, your 'lifestyle'

Judging (J)
Likes a planned, organised approach to life, and prefers to have things decided.

OR

Perceiving (P)
Likes a flexible, spontaneous approach and prefers to keep options open.


The final 'best-fit type' uses one letter from each dimension, eg ENFJ, ISTP etc. When applied in an ethical and directed way, understanding your own and other's preferences can drive tangible improvements to working relationships and job satisfaction.

MBTI® Step II

MBTI® Step II is a multiple-choice personality assessment that looks beyond the type framework proposed by Step I and uncovers the many different facets of type that make each individual unique. The MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) framework helps people improve their working and personal relationships in a positive and constructive way.

Step II looks at differences not only between but within types by giving information about the five facets of each type preference.

How does it work?

Following on from the insights of Step I, Step II looks at differences not only between but within types by giving information about the five facets of each type preference.

These are:

Extraversion-Introversion

Where you prefer to get and focus your 'energy' or attention

Initiating
Expressive
Gregarious
Active
Enthusiastic

Receiving
Contained
Intimate
Reflective
Quiet

Sensing-Intuition

The kind of information you prefer to gather and trust

Concrete
Realistic
Practical
Experiential
Traditional

Abstract
Imaginative
Conceptual
Theoretical
Original

Thinking-Feeling

The process you prefer to use in evaluating information and coming to decisions

Logical
Reasonable
Questioning
Critical
Tough

Empathetic
Compassionate
Accommodating
Accepting
Tender

Judging-Perceiving

How you prefer to deal with the world around you, your 'lifestyle'

Systematic
Planful
Early starting
Scheduled
Methodical

Casual
Open-Ended
Pressure-Prompted
Spontaneous
Emergent


Each facet combination acts as a trait scale, and scores can be plotted along this scale, eg Systematic-Casual, Practical-Conceptual. The beauty of Step II lies in the fact that individuals can obtain 'in-preference' or 'out-of-preference' scores on each facet.

This can:

Clarify specific areas where others may have seen their approach as inconsistent

  • Reassure sceptics that there are more than 16 'types of people' in the world and they are complex individuals
  • Uncover and resolve problematic differences between people of the same Step I type
  • Help others discover the distinctive way they express their type

 

MBTI® Communication Style Report

Improve individual and team communication with this report


Effective communication is a core competency in today's global, fast-paced, team-oriented organizations - when done well it can be a competitive advantage. The MBTI® Communication Style Report uses type preferences as a framework for understanding an individual's natural communication style and that of others. The online report can help your clients or employees understand their communication strengths, offers practical tips for communicating with others, and suggests steps for development.

This personalised interpretive report is based on reported or verified four-letter type results. Use the report along with Introduction to Type® and Communication booklet for team building, leadership development and conflict management initiatives.

MBTI® Decision-Making Style Report

Help individuals make better decisions — and better contributions — with this new report

Katherine W. Hirsh and Elizabeth Hirsh

The MBTI® Decision-Making Style Report uses type preferences as a framework for understanding an individual's decision-making style. This online report helps individuals become better decision makers by alerting them to their decision-making strengths, potential challenges, and areas for development. Additionally, it explains how type dynamics impact their style and offers key questions to consider during the decision-making process to facilitate more comprehensive decisions.

The Tips and Action Steps section provides insights and suggestions to guide further coaching and development, including what to consider when presented with a difficult decision, how to work with others for decision-making assistance, and how individuals can flex their style to improve communication with others and enhance their decision making.

 

MBTI® Conflict Style Report

Avoid the damage and waste that conflict can cause


Conflict is a natural part of everyone's working and personal life, and though it often appears to be triggered by a simple, straightforward issue, conflict often stems from some core element of trust, beliefs, authority or passion being challenged.

This can lead to damaging conflict situations that waste time and effort in the workplace.

Benefits

  • Improve the effectiveness of your business and avoid damaging conflict by recognising how personality preferences influence people’s approach to conflict situations
  • Achieve better conflict outcomes by adapting your approach to different conflict styles and situations
  • Improve your conflict-management effectiveness using practical tips and advice

Features

  • Summary of your Myers-Briggs results
  • Your conflict style profile
  • Myers-Briggs type and conflict pairs
  • Understanding others in conflict
  • The conflict management model
  • Developing your conflict management style
  • Tips for dealing with other conflict styles

Applications

  • Conflict management
  • Improving teams
  • Leadership development
  • Effective management
  • Coaching