A group of students work together.

Career-long Professional Learning (CLPL) 2020-21

Here is a catalogue of our CLPL.  It can be delivered in a variety of ways.  If you don’t see what you’re looking for or would like to discuss available options, please contact us.  Find out more about other courses on offer including MEd.

This course will be suitable to a wide range of professionals, including teachers/other education professionals, multi-disciplinary team professionals, health professionals, social workers, commissioning teams, as well as professionals from the third sectors. It would also be suitable for university students and can be adapted for pupils in mainstream schools to provide them with a better understanding of peers who may have ASD. It could also be adapted for families/ carers/significant others with autistic family members. The course has also been delivered to autistic people to allow them a greater understanding of “self”. It can be delivered at different levels depending on the target audience and duration can be variable depending on the needs of the audience.

With the increasing prevalence and diagnosis raising the awareness of ASD, the demand for specialist Autism training is rising to ensure professionals meet the requirements for registration with bodies such as the GTCS, SSSC and NMC. Furthermore, the course fits strategically within the legislative, policy and guideline arena and links to legislation within education, health and social care. This includes the Scottish Strategy for Autism (2011), Keys to Life (2019), the Additional Support for Learning (Scotland) Act 2004 and 2009 amended, as well as the Education Act (Scotland) 2016. With the establishment of the HSCP, the Public Bodies (Joint Working) (Scotland) Act 2014 is more than relevant to this course as well as the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs; academics; policy makers; pupils; students; and autistic people and their families/carers

Maximum number of participants: Format dependent

Frequency of sessions:

  • This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions
  • This course may run a number of times in the academic year

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The session(s) may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

For more details contact:   gillian.mcconnell.100@strath.ac.uk

This short course will allow participants to:

  • Understand what is meant by ‘learning by enquiring’;
  • Explore models, questions and tools for engaging in ‘learning by enquiring’;
  • Reflect on their current practice and identify opportunities for change that link to current priorities and policy;
  • Make informed decisions to improve educational outcomes for children, by designing, implementing and reviewing a professional enquiry; and
  • Ask questions about their professional practice and opportunities for career growth.

This course will be suitable for participants who are considering undertaking a Masters in Education programme in the future.

This course is suitable for the following participants: Beginning teachers (all sectors) – within the first five years of teaching

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions:

  • This is a series of sessions (12 hours in total)
  • This course may run a number of times in the academic year

Duration of one session: Twilight session

Format:

  • The session(s) may be on-line
  • The sessions may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

For more details contact:   lee.coutts@strath.ac.uk

The course is the opportunity for teachers and middle leaders to develop their skills and will touch on the importance of teachers having a voice as leaders and the values of leaders as enabling respect and fulfilment in the workplace.

Through interactive activities, discussion and debate, participants will consider the latest research and theories in relation to their own situation and context. It will allow them to reflect on their own preferred styles and to complete self-reflection during key stages of the programme. The challenges of empowerment and potential ramifications of this in relation to their role will be explored.

This short course draws on our MEd in Educational Leadership and acts well as a standalone course, or as a potential pre-cursor to further study. The final stages of the course will give guidance to participants in exploring their potential for leadership within their current roles, what that might look like and how they can move forward.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; and middle leaders, principal teachers; and college lecturers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day or twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

For more details contact:   joanna.holmes@strath.ac.uk 

This short course will support participants to consider the place of children’s rights in educational contexts, and wider society. We will explore dilemmas and tensions in relation to children’s rights, and how we might explore these issues with colleagues and the children and young people with whom participants’ work. We will examine human rights education and how we might educate children and young people about, through and for human rights.

With the UNCRC being incorporated into Scots law and rights being central to Professional Standards, it is imperative that practitioners are equipped with the knowledge, language and confidence to address rights-based issues. This short course will facilitate practitioners in developing their knowledge, language and confidence in children’s rights. Through dialogue, we will reflect on theoretical issues in the session(s) and will also provide some practical advice and guidance that practitioners may take back to their contexts.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

For more details contact:   claire.cassidy@strath.ac.uk

This short course involves engaging classroom assistants in a learning programme to develop their knowledge, confidence and skills in providing tailored and responsive literacy and numeracy support for children.

 

Over the twelve-week programme themes explored include:

  • You as a Learner
  • Three Domains of Learning
  • Listening and Talking
  • Supporting Reading
  • Supporting Comprehension
  • Storytelling
  • Supporting Writers
  • Supporting Numeracy
  • Taking a Playful Approach
  • The Journey of the Child

 

The course culminates in a collaborative activity in which the classroom assistants work in small groups to create a display board, which evidences their learning journey over the course and the impact of their work in school.

 

The course can be tailored to suit the priorities of local authorities, individual schools, or school clusters.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: Classroom/ASN Assistants

Maximum number of participants: 30

Frequency of sessions: This is a series of sessions for Classroom Assistants. This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of session for ASN/SL Assistants

Duration of one session: Whole day (for ASN/SL assistants); half day (for either group)

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

For more details contact:   evelyn.hart@strath.ac.uk

What makes a feminist classroom? What forms can a feminist education take? Gender inequalities have been an enduring and central focus of equalities legislation, in part as a result of sustained feminist efforts. This session is for anyone interested in advancing their understanding of gender inequalities and feminist politics in relation to education, across compulsory and post-compulsory education contexts.

Securing women’s and girls’ access to education has a long history as an emancipatory feminist project, and while there is a contemporary success story we can tell about women’s and girls’ educational achievements, entrenched inequalities remain. This is particularly so when it comes to educational leadership, pay differentials among educators, the ways that credibility and authority are conceived and ascribed, and the gendering of particular subject disciplines as masculine or feminine.

Drawing on research and teaching expertise, this session introduces a range of feminist perspectives, and will provide the opportunity for participants to work creatively and collaboratively to develop ideas about what feminist classrooms might look like, enquiring into the possibilities and limits of feminist education. Thinking with feminism about education also involves asking critical questions about the intersecting forms of inequality that education can reproduce, challenge and change. 

This course is suitable for the following participants: Primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs, e.g. Stonewall, Equality Network, LGBT Youth Scotland; academics; policy makers; pupils; and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

For more details contact:   maddie.breeze@strath.ac.uk or yvette.taylor@strath.ac.uk

‘Creativity and innovation are enabled by environments that engage with diversity, celebrate complexity, and value collaboration’ (Davis et al., 2012)

Participants will learn relevant and practical skills and techniques in music and art which can harness children’s natural curiosity, creativity and expression across all disciplines.

This CLPL will support practitioners to develop their thinking and practical skills for creative and inclusive pedagogies which include all learners in their classrooms. Drawing on current research evidence on the benefits of STEAM and interdisciplinary learning for children, participants will explore how centring pedagogy in the Expressive Arts supports collaboration and learning for all.

This short course uses theories of ‘multi-modal literacies’ to help practitioners understanding the role that music and art play as ‘the material of human thinking’ (Trevarthen, 2013). Participants will gain confidence in supporting children’s voice and agency to ensure that every child’s innate desire for creativity and collaboration is realised in an inclusive learning space.

No specialist expertise in music or art required!

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; students; and arts organisations, play organisations and youth club leaders

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions. It will run this once in the academic year (between January and June).

Duration of one session: Whole day

Format:

  • The session(s) will be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:   jane.catlin@strath.ac.uk

As recent national survey evidence in Scotland demonstrates, there is a lack of music specialists within our primary schools. This means the need to support teachers in delivering music with confidence has never been more important.

Participants will be involved in a practical session (or sessions) that explores progressive pedagogical approaches to delivering music in the primary school. The session(s) will concentrate on Early to 2nd Level of CfE where there will be a focus on developing skills in beat and rhythm, with opportunities to create and compose.  Looking at best practice, participants will have the opportunity to explore how to design their own music framework for their school, through exploring CfE experiences and outcomes and national benchmarks .This session also leads on to reading music using the ‘sound before symbol’ method linked to Kodály.

This short course is aimed at supporting the non-specialist to deliver music with more confidence and effectiveness.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This short course can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of session. It will run up to three times in the academic year.

Duration of one session: Twilight session

Format:

  • The session may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

For more details contact:  paul.wickham@strath.ac.uk

The aim of disciplinary literacy is to develop literacy skills among learners in a subject specific context.  This short course is aimed at building secondary teachers’ confidence in delivering literacy support to classes that can assist pupils in engaging more effectively with the discipline.  The literacy skills developed will facilitate greater understanding of the content and purpose of a text and learners will be able to write more effectively in the subject area.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: secondary teachers; and headteachers; 

Maximum number of participants: Up to 100, depending on the setting

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:  clare.mcalister@strath.ac.uk

This short course offers series of seminars on specific topics on Educational Technologies. We can respond to specific learning needs on request. Indicative topics include the following:

  • Digital and Transmedia storytelling
  • Instructional design models
  • Open Educational Resources
  • Augmented and Virtual Reality
  • How to create a website in 60 minutes.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; academics; and students

Maximum number of participants: No maximum number

Frequency of sessions: Each topic is a series of three sessions

Duration of one session: Twilight sessions

Format:

  • The sessions will be on-line

 

For more details contact:   stavros.nikou@strath.ac.uk

‘Responsive and intentional planning approaches start with our observations’ (Realising the Ambition, 2020).

This is an opportunity to consider the role of observation at Early Level. It will support practitioners to engage in high quality observation as part of a responsive planning cycle. Building on the narratives within the recently published National Practice Guidance for Early Years and Early Primary  (Realising the Ambition), this course will encourage staff to think deeply about WHY they observe, WHAT they observe, HOW they observe and WHAT to then do with observations. This course offers practical guidance in supporting staff to develop purposeful, skilled observation in practice.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners and primary teachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This one-off session will run several times throughout the year.

Duration of one session: Half day

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:   nicky.shaw@strath.ac.uk

Financial education is mostly evident through the Numeracy and Mathematics Experiences and Outcomes under the skill set of money and enterprise within Social Studies. The Scottish Government favours an interdisciplinary approach to providing children with financial education experiences. However, financial education has been seen to fall short in Scotland by the OECD with a lack of clarity at times with what is expected to be taught and how. This short course shall explore how to design meaningful financial education while placing children at the centre of their learning.

We shall explore:

  • the values, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of children towards money and finances;
  • the skills and knowledge children require to develop financial capabilities, pulling together threads and concepts from Curriculum for Excellence
  • effective pedagogy within financial education to provide relevance and purpose for learning;
  • how children view themselves as learners relating to financial education, how this impacts motivation to and engagement with learning; and
  • recently designed supportive guidance and resources to develop meaningful financial wellbeing in schools.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions. The session(s) will run two to three times between January and June.

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Please note, if the school requires a half day or twilight as a standalone session, then there would be limited time for teachers to design financial education experiences, with support from the CLPL leader, which would be one of the most valuable and impactful aspects of these sessions.

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   jackie.marshall@strath.ac.uk

This CLPL engages practitioners from all education settings to develop deeper understanding of the principles and pedagogical approaches for inclusion. Providing inclusive and equitable quality education is essential to achieving sustainable development, and ensuring all children’s access to effective educational supports is vital in post-pandemic recovery. The recent report Support for Learning: All our children and All Their Potential (Scottish Government, 2020) highlights the importance, and urgency, for workforce development in area of ASN and the Additional Support for Learning legislation (recommendation 5.1).

This short course is intended to address some of the key recommendations from this report and help participants build capacity and self-efficacy in working with ASN pupils by connecting theory, practice and policy. Participants will explore how to improve outcomes for children, families and wider communities (in accordance with the GIRFEC practice model) through participatory approaches, shifting from deficit models of ‘additional support needs’ towards strength/asset based practices. Respecting teachers as agents of change, participants will be encouraged to consider how they might utilise their own creative approaches to promote inclusion, equity and social justice in classrooms and other educational contexts.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs; academics; policy makers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 20

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions and will run twice in the academic year.

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:  jane.catlin@strath.ac.uk

To support teachers in achieving an equitable and inclusive approach to teaching maths in their classrooms, we need to examine current practices and the accepted ‘norms’ of school and class structures, uncovering how they can emphasise difference and even perpetuate disadvantage among children who may already have recognised barriers to their learning.

 

Drawing on recommendations from the Making Maths Count group, this short course will identify and critique a range of pedagogical approaches that are intended to support the national drive to improve the perception of maths as a subject in which all children can and should experience success in learning. This class will consider recent policy developments and expectations relating to the Scottish Attainment Challenge and will be informed in part by recent findings from the Scottish Council of Deans Attainment Challenge Research Project.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers and headteachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:  june.pisaneschi@strath.ac.uk

Gaelic is a minority language with status equal to the English language in Scotland. The Scottish Government, through Bòrd na Gàidhlig, is committed to ensuring Gaelic has a sustainable future in Scotland and aims to increase the number of individuals that can speak Gaelic, as well as encouraging its use and facilitating access to Gaelic language and culture.

Under the Scottish Government’s policy Language Learning in Scotland: a 1 + 2 Approach, Gaelic can be taught in primary schools, either as an L2 or L3.  This CLPL will help teachers with the language, skills and resources needed to deliver Gaelic (for learners) as an L2 or L3 in the primary school.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 20

Frequency of sessions: This is a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Twilight sessions

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:   ingeborg.birnie@strath.ac.uk

This session will appeal to anyone interested in thinking critically about practising LGBTQ+ inclusive education, across different educational contexts and levels. The session is framed by a fast-evolving policy landscape, including the Scottish Parliament’s recent declaration of comprehensive support for LGBT+ Inclusive Education. It relates to broader equalities legislation and CfE core commitments and universities’ increasing concern with inclusion. 

We draw on research and teaching expertise as well as our experience partnering with LGBTQ+ advocacy and support groups to place LGBTQ+ inclusive education in historical context. This will involve considering the legacy of Section 2a of the Local Government Act 1988, which banned the ‘promotion of homosexuality’ by local authorities, alongside histories and presences of LGBTQI+ politics and activism. With relevance to sex and relationship education, as well as issues of inclusion across the curriculum, the session will equip participants with tools to critically evaluate different approaches to inclusive education, including by exploring tensions between inclusion within educational systems and attempts to transform those systems.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs, for example, Stonewall, Equality Network, LGBT Youth Scotland; academics; policy makers; pupils; and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:   maddie.breeze@strath.ac.uk or yvette.taylor@strath.ac.uk

Those who work with children and young people can have limited experience of being part of a group that is marginalised within society. When we have the opportunity to work with marginalised groups we often think first about what we can do for them. This session will consider instead what we can learn from marginalised groups that can help us to understand the role that those who work with children and young people can play in disrupting some of the negative outcomes that are often expected. This session will focus on work done with young offenders to help teachers and other professionals to consider the home, school and community experiences that have had a lasting impact on the young people’s future.

As well as sharing the work done in this area, there will be an opportunity for those attending to consider how they can develop resources that can help them to learn from those with whom they work.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs, for example, charities linked to criminal justice, that support school exclusion; academics; policy makers; students; Government bodies, social work colleagues; and residential child care colleagues

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Twilight session

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:   amanda.j.corrigan@strath.ac.uk

Remembering facts, concepts and skills over the long-term is essential to any aspect of education, and yet many teachers do not fully understand how human memory works.

In this workshop, decades of research in cognitive psychology will be succinctly condensed into an overview that gets right to the heart of what teachers should understand about long-term memory.

It will explain the role of meaningful associations and schema knowledge, the benefits of spaced retrieval practice to tackle forgetting, and the role of interleaving or mixing of concepts and skills.

The workshop will then show teachers how they can apply research to their classroom practice. Focusing on the role of challenge and ‘desirable difficulties’ in learning, teachers will be introduced to a range of ways in which activities could prompt active retrieval, develop broad schema knowledge, and make progress more visible to both learner and teacher.

This work will suggest specific changes – some minor, some more radical – to existing lesson plans, such as by incorporating more active retrieval practice and greater intermixing of key skills and knowledge, allowing these simple but powerful changes to be put to work in improving pupil attainment.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; academics; and policy makers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions and may run several times through the year.

Duration of one session: Half day

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:   jonathan.firth@strath.ac.uk

Why are we here?  Am I awake or am I dreaming?  Is there an end to space?  What makes something wrong? 

Have you ever thought about or puzzled over these questions?  Children and young people do… all the time!  This short course will help you generate philosophical discussions to help children and young people explore these types of questions. 

Looking for opportunities to promote talking and listening in your classroom? Enthusiastic about interdisciplinary learning? Seeking approaches to develop children’s thinking and reasoning?  Keen to promote children’s and young people’s voice and participation? Conscious that children and young people are interested in asking questions and exploring possible answers?  Then, this short course is for you.

 

The session(s) will introduce practitioners to practical philosophy with children and young people. We will consider how to source a good stimulus to provoke philosophical questions, how to choose good philosophical questions to start dialogue, and how to create conditions conducive to philosophy in the classroom. Participants will also engage in philosophical dialogue at their own level and reflect on how they might create a philosophical, thinking ethos in their classroom while reflecting on how it might support their teaching.

 

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs; academics; and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:  claire.cassidy@strath.ac.uk

The session considers practical steps to overcoming some of the barriers, identified by research, to full inclusion in STEM education. The practical approaches that will be illustrated use hands-on activities and the sharing of relevant resources with participants, so that they can evaluate which will be most useful in their own settings. The activities will NOT depend on having access to expensive, specialist equipment but focus on using ‘everyday’ items and materials.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; third sector organisations working with people with ASN; academics; and policy makers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions. It will be offered three times in the academic year.

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be live or on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:  jane.essex@strath.ac.uk

This short course aims to provide a practical overview of what practitioner enquiry is and give ideas about how to develop enquiry projects. Drawing on a range of experiences of working with schools, we share different enquiry models from across different contexts and work with settings to develop a model that works for them. This can be a one-off or a series of inputs through the academic year or longer. Throughout, sessions are based in coaching methodology and are discussion-based, providing opportunities to consider the potential for enquiry to be used as a collaborative professional learning tool to enhance student learning.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; and headteachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:   kate.wall@strath.ac.uk

‘The importance of involving children and young people in the design and delivery of health and wellbeing /PSE lessons is crucial. This needs to be meaningful and allows teachers and school staff to really understand the 21st century issues that affect children's and young people's lives as they emerge’

(Scottish Government Review of Personal and Social Education, 23 January 2019).

Improving young people’s health and wellbeing sits at the heart of school improvement priorities. To offer effective support, it’s understood that we must shape learning experiences and whole school culture with young people themselves. The recent recommendations, published by Scotland’s Children and Young People’s Mental Health Task Force, underlines the importance of ‘putting the experience and voices of young people at the heart of creating solutions designed for them’ (July 2019).

 

This short course has been designed to explore how schools can better engage pupils in school wellbeing and develop meaningful approaches to pupil voice, engagement and agency in health planning and development. The course will highlight current issues and research to set the scene and go on to showcase a model for pupil-led approaches that encompass improving mental health, school bullying, improving PSE provision or general school wellbeing.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; and pupils

Maximum number of participants: 12

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Twilight session

Format:

  • The session(s) will be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:  monica.porciani@strath.ac.uk

Pupils of all ages need to develop good study habits, helping them to become successful, independent learners. However, most do not know how to study effectively because the process of learning is not intuitive, and effort only goes so far.

This session will cover the essentials of good study habits that can be applied to note-taking, revision, working for tests, review and consolidation work, and exam preparation. Drawing on the contemporary cognitive psychology of how people learn, this session will debunk certain popular myths and focus on well-evidenced study strategies that can be used by pupils of all ages and attainment levels.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: teachers and pupils

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:   jonathan.firth@strath.ac.uk

This short course is underpinned by a socio-cultural perspective and framed within a public health approach. It adopts a stance that mental health is not extra-curricular and it is based on the continuum model. It is considered that education very much has a role to play in supporting children and young people’s mental health, with schools very often being the hub for a multi-agency approach.

Sessions will take account of relevant policy and legislation, e.g. Scottish Government’s Mental Health Strategy 2017-2027; Education Scotland’s Positive Mental Wellbeing 2020; Scotland’s Wellbeing Report; National Performance Framework and national outcomes; Getting it Right for Every Child; UNCRC being incorporated into Scots law; CfE refreshed narrative; Realising the Ambition 2020; and the National Improvement Framework and Improvement Plan 2020.

The content of the sessions will include understanding what mental health is; its prevalence in children and young people; how it influences learning and attainment; the misconceptions and stigma around mental health; and some approaches that can be used in schools. Sessions are designed to be interactive and collaborative, allowing participants to explore some approaches to supporting the children and young people with whom they work. Links will be made to theory and practice, which aligns with the GTCS suite of Professional Standards. Consideration will be given to the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on children, young people and their families.

This course is relevant to anyone working with children and young people in Scotland, and for those interested in social justice and equity.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

For more details contact:   c.robb@strath.ac.uk

This is an opportunity to consider how to support young children’s emotional development with a focus on interactions between staff and children. Reflecting the ethos of the recently published National Practice Guidance for Early Years and Early Primary  (Realising the Ambition), this course introduces staff to approaches which move away from behaviour management towards a focus on ‘brain-building’ through engaging in warm, empathic interactions with young children.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; and headteachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This is a standalone session that will run several times throughout the year

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:   nicky.shaw@strath.ac.uk

This short course will provide a space and community to discuss and share children’s books. Sessions will start with responding to the texts as readers and will then move onto thinking about how these books can be used in the classroom. We will read and discuss a variety of books from picture-books to novels, depending on interests and suggestions made by teachers involved in the sessions. By reading more children’s books – and reading them as readers and as teachers, the aim is for us to be able to confidently and genuinely discuss and recommend new titles to children in our classes and in this way develop children’s motivation and enthusiasm for reading for pleasure.

Reading for enjoyment and choice might be said to underpin literacy and English experiences and outcomes, and also children’s and adults’ attitudes towards reading and what they get out of it. Cremin et al. (2009) suggest the ongoing importance for teachers to familiarise themselves with a wide range of children’s books to allow them to ‘foster reader development, make book recommendations to individuals and promote independent reading for pleasure’ (p. 12). This is a collaborative CLPL opportunity that could also work across a number of different schools, thus extending the reading community.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; headteachers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Twilight sessions

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:  fiona.ramsay.100@strath.ac.uk

This short course follows a public health approach and has never been more necessary for professionals working with children and young people. The Covid-19 pandemic has raised the prominence of wellbeing and one unintended consequence of the Government’s measures to keep Scotland safe and protected (e.g. lockdown) has been an increase in domestic violence, child abuse and child exploitation. Such experiences will influence children and young people’s development and their health and wellbeing.

This important aspect of individuals’ lives is framed within policy and legislation in Scotland, e.g. Scotland’s Wellbeing Report; National Performance Framework and national outcomes; Getting it Right for Every Child and the National Practice model; UNCRC being incorporated into Scots law; CfE refreshed narrative;  National Improvement Framework and Improvement Plan: 2020; Realising the Ambition 2020.

Sessions are based on the principle that ‘adversity is not destiny’. The content of sessions includes raising awareness and understanding about adversity and trauma; exploring the concept of trauma informed practice; considering the evidence base on Adverse Childhood Experiences; and how school staff can promote protective factors in children and young people’s lives to help buffer the impact of the adversity and trauma they have experienced.

Sessions are designed to be interactive and collaborative, allowing participants to explore some approaches to supporting the children and young people with whom they work. Links will be made to theory and practice, which aligns with the GTCS suite of Professional Standards. This course is relevant to anyone working with children and young people in Scotland, and for those interested in social justice and equity.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of session

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   c.robb@strath.ac.uk

This session will draw on four research studies that have explored the features of science, science teaching and science learning, that can enhance or limit accessibility. It will focus on examples of good practice that respond to the barriers and opportunities that have been identified, and provide plenty of practical suggestions for practitioners.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; third sector/NGOs, for example, STEM education and outreach organisations, campaigners around disability & equality; academics in Education and Physical & Natural Sciences; policy makers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 30

Frequency of sessions: This is a standalone session that will be repeated throughout the year

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

 

For more details contact:   jane.essex@strath.ac.uk

Who is expected to pursue further and higher education? Who is tacitly or directly excluded? With university-level qualifications positioned as a key route to social mobility, participation in post-compulsory education resonates with key policy urgencies across the UK, and is visible in initiatives like the Scottish Funding Council’s Commission on Widening Access.

Widening participation drives position education as a social good, with the capacity to offer re-dress for various forms of privilege and disadvantage. This session will appeal to educators who are interested in the theory and practice of addressing educational inequalities in access to college and university. Widening participation agendas and initiatives typically target specific groups; particularly those from areas classified as suffering from ‘multiple deprivation’, although definitions of ‘widening participation groups’ vary and can include women, mature students, and ethnic minorities.

Drawing on research and teaching expertise in the field of educational inequalities, including collaborations with organisations such as LEAPS, Stand Alone and our experience developing widening participation programmes, this session will challenge participants to critically reflect on the principles and practices of widening participation.

 

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs, for example, Stonewall, Equality Network, LGBT Youth Scotland etc.; academics; policy makers; pupils; students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

 

For more details contact:  maddie.breeze@strath.ac.uk or yvette.taylor@strath.ac.uk