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Career-long Professional Learning (CLPL) 2022-23

Our CLPL can be delivered in a variety of ways.  If you don’t see what you’re looking for or would like to discuss available options, please contact us.

PDF download  - CLPL Catalogue 2022-23

View and register for our current CLPL sessions

Find out more about other courses on offer including MEd

This course will be suitable to a wide range of professionals, including teachers/other education professionals, multi-disciplinary team professionals, health professionals, social workers, commissioning teams, as well as professionals from the third sectors. It would also be suitable for university students and can be adapted for pupils in mainstream schools to provide them with a better understanding of peers who may have ASD. It could also be adapted for families/ carers/significant others with autistic family members. The course has also been delivered to autistic people to allow them a greater understanding of “self”. It can be delivered at different levels depending on the target audience and duration can be variable depending on the needs of the audience.

With the increasing prevalence and diagnosis raising the awareness of ASD, the demand for specialist Autism training is rising to ensure professionals meet the requirements for registration with bodies such as the GTCS, SSSC and NMC. Furthermore, the course fits strategically within the legislative, policy and guideline arena and links to legislation within education, health and social care. This includes the Scottish Strategy for Autism (2011), Keys to Life (2019), the Additional Support for Learning (Scotland) Act 2004 and 2009 amended, as well as the Education Act (Scotland) 2016. With the establishment of the HSCP, the Public Bodies (Joint Working) (Scotland) Act 2014 is more than relevant to this course as well as the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs; academics; policy makers; pupils; students; and autistic people and their families/carers

Maximum number of participants: Format dependent

Frequency of sessions:

  • This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions
  • This course may run a number of times in the academic year

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The session(s) may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   gillian.mcconnell.100@strath.ac.uk

This short course will allow participants to:

  • Understand what is meant by ‘learning by enquiring’;
  • Explore models, questions and tools for engaging in ‘learning by enquiring’;
  • Reflect on their current practice and identify opportunities for change that link to current priorities and policy;
  • Make informed decisions to improve educational outcomes for children, by designing, implementing and reviewing a professional enquiry; and
  • Ask questions about their professional practice and opportunities for career growth.

This course will be suitable for participants who are considering undertaking a Masters in Education programme in the future.

This course is suitable for the following participants: Beginning teachers (all sectors) – within the first five years of teaching

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions:

  • This is a series of sessions (12 hours in total): To undertake this short course, participants will be registered for all four sessions
  • This course may run a number of times in the academic year

Duration of one session: Twilight session

Format:

  • The session(s) may be on-line
  • The sessions may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   nova.scott@strath.ac.uk

The course is the opportunity for teachers and middle leaders to develop their skills and will touch on the importance of teachers having a voice as leaders and the values of leaders as enabling respect and fulfilment in the workplace.

Through interactive activities, discussion and debate, participants will consider the latest research and theories in relation to their own situation and context. It will allow them to reflect on their own preferred styles and to complete self-reflection during key stages of the programme. The challenges of empowerment and potential ramifications of this in relation to their role will be explored.

This short course draws on our MEd in Educational Leadership and acts well as a standalone course, or as a potential pre-cursor to further study. The final stages of the course will give guidance to participants in exploring their potential for leadership within their current roles, what that might look like and how they can move forward.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; and middle leaders, principal teachers; and college lecturers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day or twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   joanna.holmes@strath.ac.uk 

This short course will support participants to consider the place of children’s rights in educational contexts, and wider society. We will explore dilemmas and tensions in relation to children’s rights, and how we might explore these issues with colleagues and the children and young people with whom participants’ work. We will examine human rights education and how we might educate children and young people about, through and for human rights.

With the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child being incorporated into Scots law, and rights being central to GTCS Professional Standards, it is imperative that practitioners are equipped with the knowledge, language and confidence to address rights-based issues. This short course will facilitate practitioners in developing their knowledge, language and confidence in children’s rights. Through dialogue, we will reflect on theoretical issues in the session(s) and will also provide some practical advice and guidance that practitioners may take back to their contexts.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   claire.cassidy@strath.ac.uk

Reading for enjoyment and choice might be said to underpin literacy and English experiences and outcomes, and also children’s and adults’ attitudes towards reading. It is important for teachers to familiarise themselves with a wide range of children’s books to allow them to recommend books, to nurture reading development and to encourage independent reading for pleasure. Teachers need specific types of knowledge to support this: technical, practical and emancipatory. This latter takes us before knowing which procedures, strategies and resources to use.

Being a teacher of reading also means being a reading teacher, not least to be able to recommend texts to children but to be able to enrich children’s knowledge and experiences with new texts of different kinds. Much frustration is expressed within teaching communities as to the lack of time and space to read, and this CLPL hopes to address this feeling. The two sessions will provide the space and shared community to discuss and experience children’s texts.

Sessions will focus on our experience of texts as readers. We will read and discuss a variety of texts including poetry, picture books, wordless picture books and novels. Two of the texts will be decided in advance and others will depend on the interests and suggestions made by participants. By reading more children’s books – and reading them as readers and as teachers, the aim is for us to be able to confidently and genuinely discuss and recommend new titles to children in our classes and in this way develop children’s motivation and enthusiasm for reading. This is a collaborative CLPL opportunity that will run over two sessions. The sessions could work across a number of different schools, thus extending the reading community.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers and student teachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This is a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Twilight sessions

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   fiona.ramsay.100@strath.ac.uk

This short course involves engaging classroom assistants in a learning programme to develop their knowledge, confidence and skills in providing tailored and responsive literacy and numeracy support for children.

Over the twelve-week programme themes explored include:

  • You as a Learner
  • Three Domains of Learning
  • Listening and Talking
  • Supporting Reading
  • Supporting Comprehension
  • Storytelling
  • Supporting Writers
  • Supporting Numeracy
  • Taking a Playful Approach
  • The Journey of the Child

The course culminates in a collaborative activity in which the classroom assistants work in small groups to create a display board, which evidences their learning journey over the course and the impact of their work in school.

The course can be tailored to suit the priorities of local authorities, individual schools, or school clusters.

This course is suitable for the following participants: Classroom/ASN/SL Assistants

Maximum number of participants: 30

Frequency of sessions: This is a series of sessions for Classroom Assistants. This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of session for ASN/SL Assistants

Duration of one session: Whole day or adapted to half day sessions

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   grierson@strath.ac.uk

We live in a world where design and technology surround us and impact upon our daily lives. Though the technologies strand within CfE recognises this, primary teachers can feel unprepared or lack confidence to deliver in this area.  However, exposing pupils to design challenges builds upon their natural interest and curiosity and sees them develop skills in the subject, across the curriculum as a whole, and in life skills more generally.  Design and technology tasks appeal to all ability levels, encouraging pupils to take a pride in what they have produced, while reflecting upon important messages about the world in which we live.

Through practical activity and discussion, sessions will help give participants an insight into an approach to design and technology that will:

  • Develop their knowledge of the design process;
  • Help develop children’s skills in collaborative working and problem solving;
  • Encourage creativity and innovation;
  • Help apply design and technology to other areas of the curriculum; and
  • Reinforce important messages about sustainability and environmental awareness.

The sessions can be tailored for lower, middle or upper primary school contexts if this offering is taken up by individual schools or local authorities.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This is a series of two sessions

Duration of one session: Half-day or twilight sessions

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   david.roxburgh@strath.ac.uk 

What makes a feminist classroom? What forms can a feminist education take? Gender inequalities have been an enduring and central focus of equalities legislation, in part as a result of sustained feminist efforts. This session is for anyone interested in advancing their understanding of gender inequalities and feminist politics in relation to education, across compulsory and post-compulsory education contexts.

Securing women’s and girls’ access to education has a long history as an emancipatory feminist project, and while there is a contemporary success story we can tell about women’s and girls’ educational achievements, entrenched inequalities remain. This is particularly so when it comes to educational leadership, pay differentials among educators, the ways that credibility and authority are conceived and ascribed, and the gendering of particular subject disciplines as masculine or feminine.

Drawing on research and teaching expertise, this session introduces a range of feminist perspectives, and will provide the opportunity for participants to work creatively and collaboratively to develop ideas about what feminist classrooms might look like, enquiring into the possibilities and limits of feminist education. Thinking with feminism about education also involves asking critical questions about the intersecting forms of inequality that education can reproduce, challenge and change. 

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs, equality and diversity practitioners, and LGBT+ community organisations; academics; policy makers; pupils; and students.

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions.

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:  yvette.taylor@strath.ac.uk

This session will appeal to anyone interested in thinking critically about practising LGBTQ+ inclusive education, across different educational contexts and levels. The session is framed by a fast-evolving policy landscape, including the Scottish Parliament’s recent declaration of comprehensive support for LGBT+ Inclusive Education. It relates to broader equalities legislation and CfE core commitments and universities’ increasing concern with inclusion. 

We draw on research and teaching expertise as well as our experience partnering with LGBTQ+ advocacy and support groups to place LGBTQ+ inclusive education in historical context. This will involve considering the legacy of Section 2a of the Local Government Act 1988, which banned the ‘promotion of homosexuality’ by local authorities, alongside histories and presences of LGBTQI+ politics and activism. With relevance to sex and relationship education, as well as issues of inclusion across the curriculum, the session will equip participants with tools to critically evaluate different approaches to inclusive education, including by exploring tensions between inclusion within educational systems and attempts to transform those systems.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs, equality and diversity practitioners, and LGBT+ community organisations; academics; policy makers; pupils; and students.

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   yvette.taylor@strath.ac.uk

This session will appeal to anyone interested in contemporary debates on menstrual justice, including issues of ‘period poverty’, menstrual care and activism, the lived experience and lifecourse of menstruation and menopause, and  the place of menstrual justice across different classroom contexts. The Period Products (Free Provision) (Scotland) Act (2021) established a Scotland-wide scheme to allow anyone who needs period products to get them free of charge, including in schools, colleges and universities. While a clear policy success, questions of menstrual justice surpass bathroom and classroom provisioning, as long politicised by feminist debates and activist campaigns.  Such debates and activisms have their place in the ‘feminist classroom’ as a site of learning about the range and breadth of feminist organising. Feminist debates on and approaches to ‘menstrual justice’ suggest new ways of unlearning stigma, with conversations extending to menstrual activism, menstrual blood, menstrual products and contemporary discussions of menstruation and menopause as ‘equality, diversity and inclusion’ issues in our workplaces and educational institutions. This session thinks about why menstruation matters in creating feminist classrooms.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs; policy makers; pupils; and students.

Maximum number of participants: tbc

Frequency of sessions: This is a standalone session

Duration of one session: Half day

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:  yvette.taylor@strath.ac.uk

‘Creativity and innovation are enabled by environments that engage with diversity, celebrate complexity, and value collaboration’ (Davis et al., 2012)

Participants will learn relevant and practical skills and techniques in music and art which can harness children’s natural curiosity, creativity and expression across all disciplines.

This CLPL will support practitioners to develop their thinking and practical skills for creative and inclusive pedagogies which include all learners in their classrooms. Drawing on current research evidence on the benefits of STEAM and interdisciplinary learning for children, participants will explore how centring pedagogy in the Expressive Arts supports collaboration and learning for all.

This short course uses theories of ‘multi-modal literacies’ to help practitioners understanding the role that music and art play as ‘the material of human thinking’ (Trevarthen, 2013). Participants will gain confidence in supporting children’s voice and agency to ensure that every child’s innate desire for creativity and collaboration is realised in an inclusive learning space.

No specialist expertise in music or art required!

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; students; and arts organisations, play organisations and youth club leaders

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions. It will run this once in the academic year (between January and June).

Duration of one session: Whole day

Format:

  • The session(s) will be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   jane.catlin@strath.ac.uk

These sessions will explore opportunities to inspire curiosity and agency in young learners through innovative pedagogies and inter-disciplinary contexts. Adopting inquiry-based approaches to teaching and learning, together we will accompany Alice on her STEM adventures in Wonderland.

These sessions will prompt participants to look across the curriculum, identifying opportunities to draw children into learning through child-centred investigation and inquiry. With a focussed lens on each of the STEM disciplines, we will consider together how learning experiences can be enhanced through a connected and meaningful approach that draws on the natural wonder of childhood.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; headteachers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 20

Frequency of sessions:

  • Two linked sessions: To undertake this course, participants will be registered for both sessions
  • The session(s) will be on-line

Duration of one session: Twilight sessions

Format:

  • The session(s) will be on-line

For more details contact:   tracy.atkinson@strath.ac.uk

Finding it challenging to teach music or think you do not have the musical skills needed? This tailored CLPL is for you!

As recent evidence in Scotland demonstrates, there is a lack of music specialists within our primary schools. This means the need to support generalist primary teachers in delivering music with confidence has never been more important.

Participants will be involved in a practical session (or sessions) that explores progressive and creative approaches to delivering music in the primary school.  The session(s) will concentrate on Early to 2nd Level within CfE where there will be a focus on developing skills in beat and rhythm, with opportunities to create and compose. Looking at best practice, participants will have the opportunity to explore how to design their own music framework for their school, through exploring CfE experiences and outcomes and national benchmarks.

This CLPL will support participants’ own musical ability, giving them the tools and inspiration to lead music activities with confidence.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This short course can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions.

Duration of one session: Twilight session(s)

Format:

  • The session may be on-line
  • The session may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions) 

For more details contact:  paul.wickham@strath.ac.uk

The General Teaching Council for Scotland (2021) highlights differentiation as an approach to effective planning to meet learners’ needs (Standard 3.1.1).

Have you ever wondered, ‘How can I teach a diverse range of learners within my class in Numeracy and Maths?’ Don’t worry, you’re not alone. Over the last four decades, differentiation has been highlighted as a major challenge for teachers at all stages in their careers.

Like inclusion, differentiation is based on a set of beliefs that all children can succeed. Internationally and nationally, differentiation has become more common in practice as a response from educators to meet the diverse needs within classrooms. In differentiating, teachers adopt an inclusive philosophy and aim to support all children to learn by implementing a range of teaching and learning approaches.

This short course will explore the potential advantages and disadvantages of a range of differentiation models. It will support reflection and decision-making with regards to how we may differentiate to meet the needs of the children in our classrooms.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This is a standalone session that will run twice in the year

Duration of one session: Twilight session

Format:

  • The session will be on-line

For more details contact:   jackie.marshall@strath.ac.uk

Digital storytelling (the instructional practice that combines the art of storytelling with digital multimedia) can be a powerful teaching and learning tool in the 21st century classroom. Beyond personal narratives or historic documentaries, it can be used to inform and instruct on a variety of topics.

This short course aims to guide participants through the digital storytelling process, offering a hands-on experience (write the script, create the storyboard, compile different media elements, finalise and publish).

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; academics; and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Twilight session

Format:

  • The session(s) may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   stavros.nikou@strath.ac.uk

The refreshed narrative of CfE (Education Scotland, 2019), places children and young people at the heart of education, recognising relationships as fundamental to learning. This training session introduces an approach of Emotion Coaching (Gottman, 1996), which identifies that emotions matter to learning and provides examples of how this may be facilitated in practice. Grounded in theory relating to emotion regulation, Emotion Coaching offers a practical, empathic and brain-nurturing approach to supporting children’s emotions and subsequent behaviours.  This course is suitable for adults working with children who wish to move away from traditional discipline and behaviour management techniques towards an emotionally regulatory approach.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; student teachers; ASL teachers; and headteachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This is a standalone session that will run twice in the year

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   nicky.shaw@strath.ac.uk

‘Responsive and intentional planning approaches start with our observations’ (Realising the Ambition, 2020).

This short course offers an opportunity to consider the role of observation at Early Level. It will support practitioners to engage in high quality observation as part of a responsive planning cycle. Building on the narratives within the recently published National Practice Guidance for Early Years and Early Primary  (Realising the Ambition), this course will encourage staff to think deeply about WHY they observe, WHAT they observe, HOW they observe, and WHAT to then do with observations. This course offers practical guidance in supporting staff to develop purposeful, skilled observation in practice.  

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners and primary teachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This is a standalone session.

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   nicky.shaw@strath.ac.uk

Drawing on current research evidence on the benefits of bilingualism, this short course will support participants to develop their understanding around the importance of heritage language and culture in teaching English as an Additional Language (EAL).

Participants will gain confidence in teaching EAL and developing literacy skills across all languages. The course offers practical strategies practitioners can use to promote bilingualism in their setting, and to engage bilingual learners and their families.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; and headteachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions:

  • This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions
  • The session(s) may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The session(s) may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:  angela.de-britos@strath.ac.uk

This CLPL engages practitioners from all education settings to develop deeper understanding of the principles and pedagogical approaches for inclusion. Providing inclusive and equitable quality education is essential to achieving sustainable development, and ensuring all children’s access to effective educational supports is vital in post-pandemic recovery. The recent report Support for Learning: All our children and All Their Potential (Scottish Government, 2020) highlights the importance, and urgency, for workforce development in area of ASN and the Additional Support for Learning legislation (recommendation 5.1).

This short course is intended to address some of the key recommendations from this report and help participants build capacity and self-efficacy in working with ASN pupils by connecting theory, practice and policy. Participants will explore how to improve outcomes for children, families and wider communities (in accordance with the GIRFEC practice model) through participatory approaches, shifting from deficit models of ‘additional support needs’ towards strength/asset based practices. Respecting teachers as agents of change, participants will be encouraged to consider how they might utilise their own creative approaches to promote inclusion, equity and social justice in classrooms and other educational contexts.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs; academics; policy makers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 20

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions and will run twice in the academic year.

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:  jane.catlin@strath.ac.uk

To support teachers in achieving an equitable and inclusive approach to teaching maths in their classrooms, we need to examine current practices and the accepted ‘norms’ of school and class structures. This requires uncovering how these structures can emphasise difference and even perpetuate disadvantage among children who may already have recognised barriers to their learning.

Drawing on recommendations from the Making Maths Count group, this short course will identify and critique a range of pedagogical approaches that are intended to support the national drive to improve the perception of maths as a subject in which all children can and should experience success in learning. The course will consider recent policy developments and expectations relating to the Scottish Attainment Challenge and will be informed in part by recent findings from the Scottish Council of Deans Attainment Challenge Research Project.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers and headteachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This is a standalone session

Duration of one session: Twilight session

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:  june.pisaneschi@strath.ac.uk

Gaelic is a minority language which has ‘equal respect’ to the English language in Scotland. The Scottish Government, through Bòrd na Gàidhlig, is committed to ensuring Gaelic has a sustainable future in Scotland and aims to increase the number of individuals that can speak Gaelic, as well as encouraging its use and facilitating access to Gaelic language and culture.

Under the Scottish Government’s policy ‘Language learning in Scotland: a 1 + 2 approach’ Gaelic can be taught in primary schools, either as L2 or L3.  This short course will help teachers with the language, skills and resources needed to deliver Gaelic (for learners) either as L2 or L3 in the primary school. It will cover both language and culture, and will provide practical support and activities for the teaching and learning of Gaelic in the primary classroom.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 20

Frequency of sessions:

  • This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of session
  • This short course will run a number of times in the academic year

Duration of one session: Twilight sessions

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

Financial assistance to participate in this short course may be available

For more details contact:   ingeborg.birnie@strath.ac.uk

This short course gives an introduction to the field of Complex Additional Support Needs (CASN) within the current framework of Scottish Education. This course will consider Scottish policy and how it relates to this unique group of young people and the ways in which their CASN present themselves in the classroom context. An overview of considerations (both practical and theoretical) for practitioners will give a rounded picture of what it is like to practise in this field, followed by pedagogical considerations to ensure that young people with CASN are offered equal opportunities to participate in all aspects of education and realise their capabilities. Examples of the practical considerations that will be covered include, individuality, the importance of postural care, and communication.  These will be linked to underpinning theory and data where appropriate.

The importance of professional networking will be highlighted, and suggestions will be offered to assist with the creation of a professional network via a selection of signposted opportunities to take forward. In addition, approaches to teaching, learning and relationship building such as intensive interaction, sensology and technological supports will be introduced. Participants will be guided towards further information on all of these.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs; policy makers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions:

  • This is a standalone session
  • The session(s) may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are available

Format:

  • The session(s) may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   m.macaskill@strath.ac.uk

Instructional Design is the practice of creating instructional experiences to support the development and acquisition of knowledge and skills. Technology can play a great role in this process. However, what is the best way to teach with technology? How can technology be pedagogically sound?

This short course aims to provide a foundation of knowledge and practical skills in the field of instructional design with technology and to introduce instructional design models and frameworks with the support of digital technologies in a variety of learning contexts.  Based on the latest research of what works when it comes to technology, participants will be guided in the development of teaching episodes with technology integration.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; academics; policy makers; students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions:

  • This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions
  • The session(s) may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

Duration of one session: Twilight session

Format:

  • The session(s) may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact: stavros.nikou@strath.ac.uk

This session will look at what a recent EU-funded project, and other initiatives run at Strathclyde, reveal about the shared causes of under-representation of various groups in STEM. It considers issues of how pupils are made to feel that they ‘belong’ in STEM subjects, and adjustments that can facilitate full participation and achievement. The session will share early findings and then guide workshop participants in considering how they might make small adjustments to their own teaching and assessment to enhance the engagement of all pupils.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners, primary teachers, secondary teachers, student teachers, FE lecturers, policy makers, and academics

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This is a standalone session

Duration of one session: Half-day or twilight session

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:  jane.essex@strath.ac.uk

Remembering facts, concepts and skills over the long-term is essential to any aspect of education, and yet many teachers do not fully understand how human memory works.

In this workshop, decades of research in cognitive psychology will be succinctly condensed into an overview that gets right to the heart of what teachers should understand about long-term memory.

It will explain the role of meaningful associations and schema knowledge, the benefits of spaced retrieval practice to tackle forgetting, and the role of interleaving or mixing of concepts and skills.

The workshop will then show teachers how they can apply research to their classroom practice. Focusing on the role of challenge and ‘desirable difficulties’ in learning, teachers will be introduced to a range of ways in which activities could prompt active retrieval, develop broad schema knowledge, and make progress more visible to both learner and teacher.

This work will suggest specific changes – some minor, some more radical – to existing lesson plans, such as by incorporating more active retrieval practice and greater intermixing of key skills and knowledge, allowing these simple but powerful changes to be put to work in improving pupil attainment.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; academics; and policy makers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions and may run several times through the year.

Duration of one session: Half day

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   jonathan.firth@strath.ac.uk

How much are you, as a mentor (or aspiring to be a mentor) of a student-teacher, responsible for training and retaining student-teachers? Increasingly classroom teachers supporting and mentoring students and novice teachers in their learning are recognised as important.

If you are a secondary school-based mentor or are aspiring to be one in the future, join this short course to learn more about being an effective mentor. This session will provide some practical guidance to support you in developing yourself as a reflective and teacher-oriented mentor, with a view to supporting the development of autonomous and effective student-teachers with a life-long learning attitude. The key topics covered in this session will include:

  • Developing a mentor-mentee relationship and conducting mentor-mentee meetings effectively;
  • Supporting student-teachers’ development from developing subject (science) knowledge to pedagogical content knowledge (PCK); and  
  • Supporting student-teachers with lesson planning, teaching and self-evaluation.

This course is suitable for the following participants: secondary teachers and headteachers

Maximum number of participants: 20

Frequency of sessions:

  • This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions
  • The session(s) will be on-line

Duration of one session: Half day session

Format:

  • The session(s) will be on-line

For more details contact:   saima.salehjee@strath.ac.uk

Why are we here?  Am I awake or am I dreaming?  Is there an end to space?  What makes something wrong? 

Have you ever thought about or puzzled over these questions?  Children and young people do… all the time!  This short course will help you generate philosophical discussions to help children and young people explore these types of questions. 

Looking for opportunities to promote talking and listening in your classroom? Enthusiastic about interdisciplinary learning? Seeking approaches to develop children’s thinking and reasoning?  Keen to promote children’s and young people’s voice and participation? Conscious that children and young people are interested in asking questions and exploring possible answers?  Then, this short course is for you.

The session(s) will introduce practitioners to practical philosophy with children and young people. We will consider how to source a good stimulus to provoke philosophical questions, how to choose good philosophical questions to start dialogue, and how to create conditions conducive to philosophy in the classroom. Participants will also engage in philosophical dialogue at their own level and reflect on how they might create a philosophical, thinking ethos in their classroom while considering how it might support their teaching.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs; academics; and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:  claire.cassidy@strath.ac.uk

The session considers practical steps to overcoming some of the barriers, identified by research, to full inclusion in STEM education. The practical approaches that will be illustrated use hands-on activities and the sharing of relevant resources with participants, so that they can evaluate which will be most useful in their own settings. The activities will NOT depend on having access to expensive, specialist equipment but focus on using ‘everyday’ items and materials.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; third sector organisations working with people with ASN; academics; and policy makers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions. It will be offered three times in the academic year.

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:  jane.essex@strath.ac.uk

This short course aims to provide a practical overview of what practitioner enquiry is and give ideas about how to develop enquiry projects. Drawing on a range of experiences of working with schools, we share different enquiry models from across different contexts and work with settings to develop a model that works for them. This can be a one-off or a series of inputs through the academic year or longer. Throughout, sessions are based in coaching methodology and are discussion-based, providing opportunities to consider the potential for enquiry to be used as a collaborative professional learning tool to enhance student learning.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; and headteachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   kate.wall@strath.ac.uk

Pupils of all ages need to develop good study habits, helping them to become successful, independent learners. However, most do not know how to study effectively because the process of learning is not intuitive, and effort only goes so far.

This session will cover the essentials of good study habits that can be applied to note-taking, revision, working for tests, review and consolidation work, and exam preparation. Drawing on the contemporary cognitive psychology of how people learn, this session will debunk certain popular myths and focus on well-evidenced study strategies that can be used by pupils of all ages and attainment levels.

This course is suitable for the following participants: pupils and students

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   jonathan.firth@strath.ac.uk

Children and families affected by imprisonment face a range of challenges. These are often not fully understood by those working in education who can have limited experience of prison and imprisonment in their own lives. This session will explore the experiences of children and families when a family member is imprisoned, will consider the impact this can have on a child's schooling, and will support those attending to consider the positive action they can take.

Sessions are organised by members of the School of Education who have experience of imprisonment in a range of forms.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; classroom assistants; adults working with children in extended outreach; school leaders

Maximum number of participants: 25 

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions 

Duration of one session: Whole day or twilight sessions are possible 

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions) 

For more details contact: amanda.j.corrigan@strath.ac.uk

The science curriculum in Scotland requires teachers to incorporate scientific enquiry in their classrooms. However, teachers often find science teaching challenging because of their lack of subject knowledge. This short course aims to develop an understanding of science as an enquiry-rich subject rather than it being a plethora of scientific knowledge.

We will present a model of Enquiry Based Learning (EBL) that can be introduced in primary teaching and learning practices. The presentation of the EBL model will offer opportunities for discussion on the benefits of using children’s stories to scaffold the process of scientific enquiry. We will present example teaching practices from the popular stories, such as Curious George, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and The Wizard of Oz, to support primary teachers to include scientific enquiry practices as an integral part of their day-to-day planning and delivery of lessons.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers

Maximum number of participants: 20

Frequency of sessions:

  • This is a standalone session
  • The session will be on-line

Duration of one session: Half day session

Format:

  • The session will be on-line

For more details contact:   saima.salehjee@strath.ac.uk

It’s not all Wallace, Bruce & the Victorians: teaching history with a local slant!

This is one of three companion sessions that will support participants to reflect on the teaching of social studies within Level 2 classes and consider creative approaches to delivering Experiences and Outcomes.

History is full of intrigue, death, war and acts of heroism. It is these tales from the past that make learning history interesting and thought-provoking.

This session aims to look at ways of teaching local history and historical topics creatively and confidently. The ambition is to engage children by looking at the local environment initially then spread to areas of interest. The purpose of this session is to give participants confidence to meet the Experience and Outcomes in People, Past Events & Societies by considering alternative topics.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; student teachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Twilight sessions

Format:

  • The session will be on-line

For more details contact:   sarah.proctor@strath.ac.uk

Taking the controversy out of challenging topics: Teaching modern studies in upper primary classes

This is one of three companion sessions that will support participants to reflect on the teaching of social studies within Level 2 classes and consider creative approaches to delivering Experiences and Outcomes.

People, Society, Economy and Business can be seen as the most challenging area of the Social Studies curriculum to address with many topics viewed as potentially controversial and Political.

The aim of this one-off session is to discuss how to approach teaching political topics in a creative and engaging way, ensuring confidence with both content and resources.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; student teachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Twilight sessions

Format:

  • The session will be on-line

For more details contact:   kathryn.mccrorie@strath.ac.uk

Forget about the turtles!

Introducing the Climate Crisis through People, Place and Environment.

This is one of three companion sessions that will support participants to reflect on the teaching of social studies within Level 2 classes and consider creative approaches to delivering Experiences and Outcomes.

Homeless orangutans, starving polar bears and plastic bound turtles have become synonymous with the Climate Crisis in the minds of learners. However, this international problem also has local impacts that can often be overlooked when investigating environmental issues in the classroom. Have you been considering how you can introduce your class to the Climate Crisis in a meaningful and relatable way? Then, this session is for you!

This short session explores ways practitioners can integrate discussions on the Climate Crisis into lessons focused on People, Place and Environment. Through current Scottish case studies, participants will discover an array of physical and human environments applicable to their settings, consider their current Geographies and gain an understanding of how these environments will be impacted upon by the Climate Crisis. Methods by which participants can empower learners to take action on climate issues in their own settings will also be covered. All content will be directly related to specific Experiences and Outcomes, allowing participants to integrate content easily into their planning.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; student teachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Twilight sessions

Format:

  • The session will be on-line

For more details contact:   w.quirke@strath.ac.uk

This session will draw on four research studies that have explored the features of science, science teaching and science learning, that can enhance or limit accessibility. It will focus on examples of good practice that respond to the barriers and opportunities that have been identified, and provide plenty of practical suggestions for practitioners.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; third sector/NGOs, for example, STEM education and outreach organisations, campaigners around disability & equality; academics in Education and Physical & Natural Sciences; policy makers; and students

Maximum number of participants: 30

Frequency of sessions: This is a standalone session that will be repeated throughout the year

Duration of one session: Half day and twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:   jane.essex@strath.ac.uk

Who is expected to pursue further and higher education? Who is tacitly or directly excluded? With university-level qualifications positioned as a key route to social mobility, participation in post-compulsory education resonates with key policy urgencies across the UK, and is visible in initiatives like the Scottish Funding Council’s Commission on Widening Access.

Widening participation drives position education as a social good, with the capacity to offer re-dress for various forms of privilege and disadvantage. This session will appeal to educators who are interested in the theory and practice of addressing educational inequalities in access to college and university. Widening participation agendas and initiatives typically target specific groups; particularly those from areas classified as suffering from ‘multiple deprivation’, although definitions of ‘widening participation groups’ vary and can include women, mature students, and ethnic minorities.

Drawing on research and teaching expertise in the field of educational inequalities, including collaborations with organisations such as LEAPS, Stand Alone and our experience developing widening participation programmes, this session will challenge participants to critically reflect on the principles and practices of widening participation.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs; equality and diversity practitioners, and LGBT+ community organisations; academics; policy makers; pupils; and students.

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This can be adapted to be a standalone session or a series of sessions

Duration of one session: Whole day, half day and twilight sessions are all possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:  yvette.taylor@strath.ac.uk

This CLPL is designed to explore the concept of story and how these emerge through using a range of wordless picture books. While many wordless texts lend themselves to being used with younger children, we will also look at texts that would appeal to pupils up to Primary 7. These visual texts have a lot to offer when exploring different concepts with children – sequencing, narrative, characterisation, visual literacy and inferential thinking. Stories and the practice of sharing them builds relationships and connections amongst people. Story plays a significant role in helping children shape and understand their own experiences, and can evoke emotional responses where children can recognise and articulate their own emotions through the understanding and experience of story.

Education Scotland’s Creativity across Learning 3 – 18, identifies the growing global discussion about the role of creativity in education. Four key creativity skills are identified: being constructively inquisitive, being open-minded, being able to harness imagination, and being able to identify and solve problems. These are closely related to skills fostered by the art and practice of oral storytelling.

In the sessions, we will explore both story and storytelling. We will look at a range of wordless picture books and consider the text and images themselves. Then we will explore ideas for how we can generate an oral response to story through different activities. Examples of texts we may look at are: The Arrival by Shaun Tan; Wave by Suzy Lee; Footpath Flowers by JonArno Lawson and Sydney Smith Journey; Quest and Return by Aaron Becker.

After our first session, you will be invited to try out an idea with your pupils. In the second session you will share your experiences and learning with the group.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers and student teachers

Maximum number of participants: 25

Frequency of sessions: This is a series of two sessions though it can be extended.

Duration of one session: Half-day or twilight sessions are possible

Format:

  • The sessions may be on-line
  • The session(s) may be delivered on-campus (subject to COVID restrictions)
  • The session(s) can be delivered at an alternative venue (subject to COVID restrictions)

For more details contact:  fiona.ramsay.100@strath.ac.uk