Classmates Drawing Together, 1600x600

CLPL Currently on Offer

A Pragmatic Introduction to Practitioner Enquiry

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Jonathan Firth

This workshop will introduce participants to the practitioner enquiry process and explore strategies to ensure that it is doable alongside other competing demands teachers and education practitioners normally have. Using real life examples, the workshops will support participants in engaging with different kinds of evidence, either originating in school or in research, and support them in thinking about what is useful in answering their practitioner enquiry questions. It will aim to demonstrate how practitioner enquiry should be part of the job rather than a hobby for Sunday afternoons. It targets people who are new to practitioner enquiry, those who are undertaking practitioner enquiry but are finding it unmanageable and those who lead practitioner enquiry cohorts and want to ensure a pragmatic approach. 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years, primary teachers, secondary teachers and headteachers.

An Enquiry Approach to Policy Engagement

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Anna Beck

This workshop will explore how practitioner enquiry can be used as a mechanism for informing, shaping and challenging education policy agendas at both local and national levels. Scottish education is undergoing a significant period of change, perhaps the biggest it has ever seen. In this fast-changing and increasingly politicised environment, schools are under increasing pressure to perform, yet concerns are often raised about the disconnect between ‘policy-makers’ and the realities of the classroom. There has never been a more important time for teachers’ voices to be heard. This workshop draws on empirical research and previous experience with research-engaged schools to consider the contribution that practitioner enquiry can make in education reform, highlighting potential challenges as well as opportunities for connecting enquiry practice to policy. This workshop is for anyone working within education who would like to employ practitioner enquiry as a tool for informing change. It will also be of interest to those who support professional learning in or across schools.  

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years, primary teachers, secondary teachers and headteachers. 

An Insight into Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Gillian McConnell

This course will be suitable to a wide range of professionals, including teachers/other education professionals, multi-disciplinary team professionals, health professionals, social workers, commissioning teams, as well as professionals from the third sectors. It would also be suitable for university students and can be adapted for pupils in mainstream schools to provide them with a better understanding of peers who may have ASD. It could also be adapted for families/ carers/significant others with autistic family members. The course has also been delivered to autistic people to allow them a greater understanding of “self”. It can be delivered at different levels depending on the target audience and duration can be variable depending on the needs of the audience.

With the increasing prevalence and diagnosis raising the awareness of ASD, the demand for specialist Autism training is rising to ensure professionals meet the requirements for registration with bodies such as the GTCS, SSSC and NMC. Furthermore, the course fits strategically within the legislative, policy and guideline arena and links to legislation within education, health and social care. This includes the Scottish Strategy for Autism (2011), Keys to Life (2019), the Additional Support for Learning (Scotland) Act 2004 and 2009 amended, as well as the Education Act (Scotland) 2016. With the establishment of the HSCP, the Public Bodies (Joint Working) (Scotland) Act 2014 is more than relevant to this course as well as the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs; academics; policy makers; pupils; students; and autistic people and their families/carers

Beginning to Lead Change through Learning by Enquiring

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Lee Coutts

This short course will allow participants to:

Understand what is meant by ‘learning by enquiring’;

Explore models, questions and tools for engaging in ‘learning by enquiring’;

Reflect on their current practice and identify opportunities for change that link to current priorities and policy;

Make informed decisions to improve educational outcomes for children, by designing, implementing and reviewing a professional enquiry; and

Ask questions about their professional practice and opportunities for career growth. 

This course will be suitable for participants who are considering undertaking a Masters in Education programme in the future.

This course is suitable for the following participants: beginning teachers (all sectors) – within the first five years of teaching

Building Teacher Leadership

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Joanna Holmes

The course is the opportunity for teachers and middle leaders to develop their skills and will touch on the importance of teachers having a voice as leaders and the values of leaders as enabling respect and fulfilment in the workplace.

Through interactive activities, discussion and debate, participants will consider the latest research and theories in relation to their own situation and context. It will allow them to reflect on their own preferred styles and to complete self-reflection during key stages of the programme. The challenges of empowerment and potential ramifications of this in relation to their role will be explored.

This short course draws on our MEd in Educational Leadership and acts well as a standalone course, or as a potential pre-cursor to further study. The final stages of the course will give guidance to participants in exploring their potential for leadership within their current roles, what that might look like and how they can move forward.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; and middle leaders, principal teachers; and college lecturers

Creating Feminist Classrooms

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Maddie Breeze/Yvette Taylor

What makes a feminist classroom? What forms can a feminist education take? Gender inequalities have been an enduring and central focus of equalities legislation, in part as a result of sustained feminist efforts. This session is for anyone interested in advancing their understanding of gender inequalities and feminist politics in relation to education, across compulsory and post-compulsory education contexts.

Securing women’s and girls’ access to education has a long history as an emancipatory feminist project, and while there is a contemporary success story we can tell about women’s and girls’ educational achievements, entrenched inequalities remain. This is particularly so when it comes to educational leadership, pay differentials among educators, the ways that credibility and authority are conceived and ascribed, and the gendering of particular subject disciplines as masculine or feminine.

Drawing on research and teaching expertise, this session introduces a range of feminist perspectives, and will provide the opportunity for participants to work creatively and collaboratively to develop ideas about what feminist classrooms might look like, enquiring into the possibilities and limits of feminist education. Thinking with feminism about education also involves asking critical questions about the intersecting forms of inequality that education can reproduce, challenge and change. 

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs, equality and diversity practitioners, and LGBT+ community organisations; academics; policy makers; pupils; and students.

Creativity for Inclusion and Inclusion for Creativity

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Paul Wickham and Jane Catlin

‘Creativity and innovation are enabled by environments that engage with diversity, celebrate complexity, and value collaboration’ (Davis et al., 2012)

Participants will learn relevant and practical skills and techniques in music and art which can harness children’s natural curiosity, creativity and expression across all disciplines.

This CLPL will support practitioners to develop their thinking and practical skills for creative and inclusive pedagogies which include all learners in their classrooms. Drawing on current research evidence on the benefits of STEAM and interdisciplinary learning for children, participants will explore how centring pedagogy in the Expressive Arts supports collaboration and learning for all.

This short course uses theories of ‘multi-modal literacies’ to help practitioners understanding the role that music and art play as ‘the material of human thinking’ (Trevarthen, 2013). Participants will gain confidence in supporting children’s voice and agency to ensure that every child’s innate desire for creativity and collaboration is realised in an inclusive learning space.

No specialist expertise in music or art required!

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; students; and arts organisations, play organisations and youth club leaders

Curiouser & Curiouser: Innovation and Engagement in Primary STEM

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Tracy Atkinson/June Pisaneschi

These sessions will explore opportunities to inspire curiosity and agency in young learners through innovative pedagogies and inter-disciplinary contexts. Adopting inquiry-based approaches to teaching and learning, together we will accompany Alice on her STEM adventures in Wonderland.

These sessions will prompt participants to look across the curriculum, identifying opportunities to draw children into learning through child-centred investigation and inquiry. With a focussed lens on each of the STEM disciplines, we will consider together how learning experiences can be enhanced through a connected and meaningful approach that draws on the natural wonder of childhood.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; headteachers; and students

Differentiation

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Jackie Marshall

The General Teaching Council for Scotland (2021) highlights differentiation as an approach to effective planning to meet learners’ needs (Standard 3.1.1).

Have you ever wondered, ‘How can I teach a diverse range of learners within my class in Numeracy and Maths?’ Don’t worry, you’re not alone. Over the last four decades, differentiation has been highlighted as a major challenge for teachers at all stages in their careers.

Like inclusion, differentiation is based on a set of beliefs that all children can succeed. Internationally and nationally, differentiation has become more common in practice as a response from educators to meet the diverse needs within classrooms. In differentiating, teachers adopt an inclusive philosophy and aim to support all children to learn by implementing a range of teaching and learning approaches.

This short course will explore the potential advantages and disadvantages of a range of differentiation models. It will support reflection and decision-making with regards to how we may differentiate to meet the needs of the children in our classrooms.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers

Digital Storytelling

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Stavros Nikou

A powerful teaching and learning practise for the modern classroom that combines the art of storytelling with digital multimedia. The workshop will go through the complete digital storytelling process offering a hands-on experience (write the script, create the storyboard, compile different media elements, finalise and publish). Workshop includes development a digital story, presentation and evaluation.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; academics; students; every individual or organisation with an interest in digital storytelling

Driving Documentation Forward - FULLY SUBSCRIBED

Course Overview

  • Date: 9th September and 15th September 2021 (both sessions must be attended)
  • Format: 18:00-19:00 via Zoom
  • Cost: £30
  • FULLY SUBSCRIBED
  • Contact: Jan Bissett

This training will explore the key features of quality documentation and examine the process involved to enhance both teaching and learning. The training will be presented by Deirdre Grogan, University of Strathclyde and is aimed at all staff working with young children. There will be time for group discussions and questions.

During the training, we will look at:

  • Why documentation is important for young children
  • Different methods of documentation
  • The importance of interactions to support the documentation of learning
  • How to support young children to document their own learning
  • Reflections, relationships and connection in documentation
  • Key elements of effective documentation

Engaging in High Quality Observations - FULLY SUBSCRIBED

Course Overview

  • Date: 29th September 2021
  • Format: 16:30-18:30 via Zoom
  • Cost: £25
  • FULLY SUBSCRIBED
  • Contact: Jan Bissett

Delivering the session: Nicky Shaw

‘Responsive and intentional planning approaches start with our observations’ (Realising the Ambition, 2020).

This short course offers an opportunity to consider the role of observation at Early Level. It will support practitioners to engage in high quality observation as part of a responsive planning cycle. Building on the narratives within the recently published National Practice Guidance for Early Years and Early Primary  (Realising the Ambition), this course will encourage staff to think deeply about WHY they observe, WHAT they observe, HOW they observe, and WHAT to then do with observations. This course offers practical guidance in supporting staff to develop purposeful, skilled observation in practice.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners and primary teachers

Engaging in High Quality Observations

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Nicky Shaw

‘Responsive and intentional planning approaches start with our observations’ (Realising the Ambition, 2020).

This short course offers an opportunity to consider the role of observation at Early Level. It will support practitioners to engage in high quality observation as part of a responsive planning cycle. Building on the narratives within the recently published National Practice Guidance for Early Years and Early Primary  (Realising the Ambition), this course will encourage staff to think deeply about WHY they observe, WHAT they observe, HOW they observe, and WHAT to then do with observations. This course offers practical guidance in supporting staff to develop purposeful, skilled observation in practice.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners and primary teachers

English as an Additional Language and Supporting Bilingual Learners

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Angela De Britos

Drawing on current research evidence on the benefits of bilingualism, this short course will support participants to develop their understanding around the importance of heritage language and culture in teaching English as an Additional Language (EAL).

Participants will gain confidence in teaching EAL and developing literacy skills across all languages. The course offers practical strategies practitioners can use to promote bilingualism in their setting, and to engage bilingual learners and their families.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; and headteachers

Getting Staff Involved in Enquiry

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Jonathan Firth and Saima Salehjee

Practitioner enquiry depends on staff engagement, and this workshop will explore the factors that motivate teachers to carry out enquiry projects of their own. Using examples from research-engaged schools throughout Scotland, the workshop will identify sustainable models of practitioner enquiry as well as some of the obstacles which at times cause projects to falter. It will then outline a set of strategies which can be used to enthuse and engage teachers in the process of enquiry. Strategies covered will focus on three key areas – provision of information, organisational factors (including finding time for enquiry), and motivation – and will provide the tools to build a durable professional culture where teachers view practitioner enquiry as part of the job. The workshop is aimed at professionals who already have some initial familiarity with the practitioner enquiry process, for example those who currently lead enquiry-based groups or projects, or who have leadership roles at departmental, school or local authority level.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years, primary teachers, secondary teachers and headteachers. 

High Quality Play and Learning - FULLY SUBSCRIBED

Course Overview

  • Date: 21st October 2021
  • Format: 17:30-19:00 via Zoom
  • Cost: £25
  • FULLY SUBSCRIBED
  • Contact: Jan Bissett

This training will focus on our understanding of ‘play’ as a vehicle for children’s learning.

Key points:

  • the importance of child-initiated learning
  • how we ensure quality learning for young children
  • challenge and progression of children’s play
  • how we link play to CfE

This training is aimed at staff within the early years.

Inclusion and ASN: theory, policy and legislation in practice and pedagogy

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Jane Catlin, Yuchen Wang

This CLPL engages practitioners from all education settings to develop deeper understanding of the principles and pedagogical approaches for inclusion. Providing inclusive and equitable quality education is essential to achieving sustainable development, and ensuring all children’s access to effective educational supports is vital in post-pandemic recovery. The recent report Support for Learning: All our children and All Their Potential (Scottish Government, 2020) highlights the importance, and urgency, for workforce development in area of ASN and the Additional Support for Learning legislation (recommendation 5.1).

This short course is intended to address some of the key recommendations from this report and help participants build capacity and self-efficacy in working with ASN pupils by connecting theory, practice and policy. Participants will explore how to improve outcomes for children, families and wider communities (in accordance with the GIRFEC practice model) through participatory approaches, shifting from deficit models of ‘additional support needs’ towards strength/asset based practices. Respecting teachers as agents of change, participants will be encouraged to consider how they might utilise their own creative approaches to promote inclusion, equity and social justice in classrooms and other educational contexts.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs; academics; policy makers; and students

Inclusive Pedagogy for Maths (Primary)

Course Overview

Delivering the session: June Pisaneschi

To support teachers in achieving an equitable and inclusive approach to teaching maths in their classrooms, we need to examine current practices and the accepted ‘norms’ of school and class structures, uncovering how they can emphasise difference and even perpetuate disadvantage among children who may already have recognised barriers to their learning.

Drawing on recommendations from the Making Maths Count group, this short course will identify and critique a range of pedagogical approaches that are intended to support the national drive to improve the perception of maths as a subject in which all children can and should experience success in learning. This class will consider recent policy developments and expectations relating to the Scottish Attainment Challenge and will be informed in part by recent findings from the Scottish Council of Deans Attainment Challenge Research Project.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers and headteachers

Introduction to Complex Additional Support Needs for Practitioners

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Maggie MacAskill

This short course gives an introduction to the field of Complex Additional Support Needs (CASN) within the current framework of Scottish Education. This course will consider Scottish policy and how it relates to this unique group of young people and the ways in which their CASN present themselves in the classroom context. An overview of considerations (both practical and theoretical) for practitioners will give a rounded picture of what it is like to practise in this field, followed by pedagogical considerations to ensure that young people with CASN are offered equal opportunities to participate in all aspects of education and realise their capabilities. Examples of the practical considerations that will be covered include, individuality, the importance of postural care, and communication.  These will be linked to underpinning theory and data where appropriate.

The importance of professional networking will be highlighted, and suggestions will be offered to assist with the creation of a professional network via a selection of signposted opportunities to take forward. In addition, approaches to teaching, learning and relationship building such as intensive interaction, sensology and technological supports will be introduced. Participants will be guided towards further information on all of these.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs; policy makers; and students

LGBTQ+Inclusive Education

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Maddie Breeze/Yvette Taylor

This session will appeal to anyone interested in thinking critically about practising LGBTQ+ inclusive education, across different educational contexts and levels. The session is framed by a fast-evolving policy landscape, including the Scottish Parliament’s recent declaration of comprehensive support for LGBT+ Inclusive Education. It relates to broader equalities legislation and CfE core commitments and universities’ increasing concern with inclusion. 

We draw on research and teaching expertise as well as our experience partnering with LGBTQ+ advocacy and support groups to place LGBTQ+ inclusive education in historical context. This will involve considering the legacy of Section 2a of the Local Government Act 1988, which banned the ‘promotion of homosexuality’ by local authorities, alongside histories and presences of LGBTQI+ politics and activism. With relevance to sex and relationship education, as well as issues of inclusion across the curriculum, the session will equip participants with tools to critically evaluate different approaches to inclusive education, including by exploring tensions between inclusion within educational systems and attempts to transform those systems.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs, equality and diversity practitioners, and LGBT+ community organisations; academics; policy makers; pupils; and students.

Memory and the Science of Learning

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Jonathan Firth

Remembering facts, concepts and skills over the long-term is essential to any aspect of education, and yet many teachers do not fully understand how human memory works.

In this workshop, decades of research in cognitive psychology will be succinctly condensed into an overview that gets right to the heart of what teachers should understand about long-term memory.

It will explain the role of meaningful associations and schema knowledge, the benefits of spaced retrieval practice to tackle forgetting, and the role of interleaving or mixing of concepts and skills.

The workshop will then show teachers how they can apply research to their classroom practice. Focusing on the role of challenge and ‘desirable difficulties’ in learning, teachers will be introduced to a range of ways in which activities could prompt active retrieval, develop broad schema knowledge, and make progress more visible to both learner and teacher.

This work will suggest specific changes – some minor, some more radical – to existing lesson plans, such as by incorporating more active retrieval practice and greater intermixing of key skills and knowledge, allowing these simple but powerful changes to be put to work in improving pupil attainment.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; academics; and policy makers

Mentoring (Science) Teachers in the Secondary School

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Saima Salehjee

How much are you, as a mentor (or aspiring to be a mentor) of a student-teacher, responsible for training and retaining student-teachers? Increasingly classroom teachers supporting and mentoring students and novice teachers in their learning are recognised as important.

If you are a secondary school-based mentor or are aspiring to be one in the future, join this short course to learn more about being an effective mentor. This session will provide some practical guidance to support you in developing yourself as a reflective and teacher-oriented mentor, with a view to supporting the development of autonomous and effective student-teachers with a life-long learning attitude. The key topics covered in this session will include:

Developing a mentor-mentee relationship and conducting mentor-mentee meetings effectively;

Supporting student-teachers’ development from developing subject (science) knowledge to pedagogical content knowledge (PCK); and  

Supporting student-teachers with lesson planning, teaching and self-evaluation.

This course is suitable for the following participants: secondary teachers and headteachers

Models of Enquiry-based School Communities

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Iain Moore

In this workshop we will use a number of models of real-life school-based practitioner enquiry communities, demonstrating the ways that they are set up and run, and exploring how the culture and dynamics of a context can be the driver to setting up a practitioner enquiry community that works. We will use the principles of autonomy, dialogue, disturbance and connectedness (based on work by Kate Wall and Elaine Hall) to engage with how to set up a community of practitioner enquiry and sustain it over time. This workshop is targeting current or aspirational leaders of practitioner enquiry cultures either within or across school settings. Just like workshop 1, the key messages will be about embedded practitioner enquiry within practice rather than it being an additional thing to add to colleagues’ lists of things to do.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years, primary teachers, secondary teachers and headteachers. 

Practical Approaches to Enhancing Inclusion in STEM

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Jane Essex

The session considers practical steps to overcoming some of the barriers, identified by research, to full inclusion in STEM education. The practical approaches that will be illustrated use hands-on activities and the sharing of relevant resources with participants, so that they can evaluate which will be most useful in their own settings. The activities will NOT depend on having access to expensive, specialist equipment but focus on using ‘everyday’ items and materials.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; third sector organisations working with people with ASN; academics; and policy makers

Pupil-Led Approaches to Health & Wellbeing

Course Overview

  • Date: Session 1: 17th March 2022; Session 2: 2nd June 2022

    Participants can undertake either the first session as a stand alone session or can sign up for both sessions if you want to explore your own practice and development.  If attending the second session participants will be given support to identify how to start implementing this in your school/workplace context. 

  • Format: 16:30-19:00 (Course will be delivered on campus if feasible)
  • Cost: £35 for Session 1 only and £55 for both sessions
  • Apply through our Online Shop to pay by card, or via our  Application Form - Pupil-Led Approaches to Health & Wellbeing
  • Contact: Claire McConnell

Delivering the session: Monica Porciani

‘The importance of involving children and young people in the design and delivery of health and wellbeing /PSE lessons is crucial. This needs to be meaningful and allows teachers and school staff to really understand the 21st century issues that affect children's and young people's lives as they emerge’ (Scottish Government Review of Personal and Social Education, 23 January 2019).

Improving young people’s health and wellbeing sits at the heart of school improvement priorities. To offer effective support, it’s understood that we must shape learning experiences and whole school culture with young people themselves. The recent recommendations, published by Scotland’s Children and Young People’s Mental Health Task Force, underlines the importance of ‘putting the experience and voices of young people at the heart of creating solutions designed for them’ (July 2019).

This short course has been designed to explore how schools can better engage pupils in school wellbeing and develop meaningful approaches to pupil voice, engagement and agency in health planning and development. The course will highlight current issues and research to set the scene and go on to showcase a model for pupil-led approaches that encompass improving mental health, school bullying, improving PSE provision or general school wellbeing.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; and pupils

Skills for Teacher Research Engagement

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Jonathan Firth

For teachers who want to take their practitioner enquiry to the next level, this workshop will establish the key skills needed to access and analyse research literature, to plan an ethical research project, and to select among different methodology options. In the workshop, teachers will learn about understanding background research, accessing research literature in a systematic way, and identifying flaws in existing work. As well as exploring methods of data gathering, the session will outline how to set up a robust teacher-centred ethics procedure to ensure that research does not cause harm to pupils, and will draw attention to the variables that must be accounted for when carrying out research in classroom environments. It will then outline some of the main opportunities available to teachers who wish to share their own research work with a wider audience through conferences or publication.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years, primary teachers, secondary teachers and headteachers. 

Study Skills – Essentials

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Jonathan Firth

Pupils of all ages need to develop good study habits, helping them to become successful, independent learners. However, most do not know how to study effectively because the process of learning is not intuitive, and effort only goes so far.

This session will cover the essentials of good study habits that can be applied to note-taking, revision, working for tests, review and consolidation work, and exam preparation. Drawing on the contemporary cognitive psychology of how people learn, this session will debunk certain popular myths and focus on well-evidenced study strategies that can be used by pupils of all ages and attainment levels.

This course is suitable for the following participants: pupils and students

Supporting Children and Families Affected by Imprisonment

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Amanda Corrigan

Children and families affected by imprisonment face a range of challenges. These are often not fully understood by those working in education who can have limited experience of prison and imprisonment in their own lives. This session will explore the experiences of children and families when a family member is imprisoned, will consider the impact this can have on a child's schooling, and will support those attending to consider the positive action they can take.

Sessions are organised by members of the School of Education who have experience of imprisonment in a range of forms. 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; classroom assistants; adults working with children in extended outreach; school leaders

Supporting Children and Young People’s Mental Health

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Catriona Robb

This short course is underpinned by a socio-cultural perspective and framed within a public health approach. It adopts a stance that mental health is not extra-curricular and it is based on the continuum model. It is considered that education very much has a role to play in supporting children and young people’s mental health, with schools very often being the hub for a multi-agency approach.

Sessions will take account of relevant policy and legislation, e.g. Scottish Government’s Mental Health Strategy 2017-2027; Education Scotland’s Positive Mental Wellbeing 2020; Scotland’s Wellbeing Report; National Performance Framework and national outcomes; Getting it Right for Every Child; UNCRC being incorporated into Scots law; CfE refreshed narrative; Realising the Ambition 2020; and the National Improvement Framework and Improvement Plan 2020.

The content of the sessions will include understanding what mental health is; its prevalence in children and young people; how it influences learning and attainment; the misconceptions and stigma around mental health; and some approaches that can be used in schools. Sessions are designed to be interactive and collaborative, allowing participants to explore some approaches to supporting the children and young people with whom they work. Links will be made to theory and practice, which aligns with the GTCS suite of Professional Standards. Consideration will be given to the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on children, young people and their families.

This course is relevant to anyone working with children and young people in Scotland, and for those interested in social justice and equity.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; and students

Supporting Emotional Regulation at Early Level

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Nicky Shaw

This short course offers an opportunity to consider how to support young children’s emotional development with a focus on interactions between staff and children. Reflecting the ethos of the recently published National Practice Guidance for Early Years and Early Primary (Realising the Ambition), this course introduces staff to approaches that move away from behaviour management towards a focus on ‘brain-building’ through engaging in warm, empathic interactions with young children 

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; and headteachers

Teaching Science through Stories:  Mounting Scientific Enquiry

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Saima Salehjee

The science curriculum in Scotland requires teachers to incorporate scientific enquiry in their classrooms. However, teachers often find science teaching challenging because of their lack of subject knowledge. This short course aims to develop an understanding of science as an enquiry-rich subject rather than it being a plethora of scientific knowledge.

We will present a model of Enquiry Based Learning (EBL) that can be introduced in primary teaching and learning practices. The presentation of the EBL model will offer opportunities for discussion on the benefits of using children’s stories to scaffold the process of scientific enquiry. We will present example teaching practices from the popular stories, such as Curious George, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and The Wizard of Oz, to support primary teachers to include scientific enquiry practices as an integral part of their day-to-day planning and delivery of lessons.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers

Trauma, Adversity and Resilience

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Catriona Robb

This short course follows a public health approach and has never been more necessary for professionals working with children and young people. The Covid-19 pandemic has raised the prominence of wellbeing and one unintended consequence of the Government’s measures to keep Scotland safe and protected (e.g. lockdown) has been an increase in domestic violence, child abuse and child exploitation. Such experiences will influence children and young people’s development and their health and wellbeing.

This important aspect of individuals’ lives is framed within policy and legislation in Scotland, e.g. Scotland’s Wellbeing Report; National Performance Framework and national outcomes; Getting it Right for Every Child and the National Practice model; UNCRC being incorporated into Scots law; CfE refreshed narrative;  National Improvement Framework and Improvement Plan: 2020; Realising the Ambition 2020.

Sessions are based on the principle that ‘adversity is not destiny’. The content of sessions includes raising awareness and understanding about adversity and trauma; exploring the concept of trauma informed practice; considering the evidence base on Adverse Childhood Experiences; and how school staff can promote protective factors in children and young people’s lives to help buffer the impact of the adversity and trauma they have experienced.

Sessions are designed to be interactive and collaborative, allowing participants to explore some approaches to supporting the children and young people with whom they work. Links will be made to theory and practice, which aligns with the GTCS suite of Professional Standards. This course is relevant to anyone working with children and young people in Scotland, and for those interested in social justice and equity.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; and students

What Research Tells us About Making Science Meaningful for All

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Jane Essex

This session will draw on four research studies that have explored the features of science, science teaching and science learning, that can enhance or limit accessibility. It will focus on examples of good practice that respond to the barriers and opportunities that have been identified, and provide plenty of practical suggestions for practitioners.

This course is suitable for the following participants: early years practitioners; primary teachers; secondary teachers; third sector/NGOs, for example, STEM education and outreach organisations, campaigners around disability & equality; academics in Education and Physical & Natural Sciences; policy makers; and students.

Widening Participation

Course Overview

Delivering the session: Maddie Breeze/Yvette Taylor

Who is expected to pursue further and higher education? Who is tacitly or directly excluded? With university-level qualifications positioned as a key route to social mobility, participation in post-compulsory education resonates with key policy urgencies across the UK, and is visible in initiatives like the Scottish Funding Council’s Commission on Widening Access.

Widening participation drives position education as a social good, with the capacity to offer re-dress for various forms of privilege and disadvantage. This session will appeal to educators who are interested in the theory and practice of addressing educational inequalities in access to college and university. Widening participation agendas and initiatives typically target specific groups; particularly those from areas classified as suffering from ‘multiple deprivation’, although definitions of ‘widening participation groups’ vary and can include women, mature students, and ethnic minorities.

Drawing on research and teaching expertise in the field of educational inequalities, including collaborations with organisations such as LEAPS, Stand Alone and our experience developing widening participation programmes, this session will challenge participants to critically reflect on the principles and practices of widening participation.

This course is suitable for the following participants: primary teachers; secondary teachers; headteachers; third sector/NGOs; equality and diversity practitioners, and LGBT+ community organisations; academics; policy makers; pupils; and students.