Colourful selection of books

School of Social Work & Social PolicySeminar Series - 2020/21

Seminar 1 - Konstantina Karastoyanova and Penny Laycock

Our first seminar is next week, on Wednesday 13th January, 12-1pm, and, chaired by Daniela Sime, we will hear from two of our PhD students, Konstantina Karastoyanova, and Penny Laycock.

Konstantina Karastoyanova will present on The Neuroendocrinology of Adversity

Penny Laycock will present on her research into The Impact of Parental Alcohol Misuse on Adult Children.

We hope that you will show your support for both this seminar and the wider seminar programme.

Please see joining details below:

Join Zoom Meeting

https://strath.zoom.us/j/97211049566  

Meeting ID: 972 1104 9566

Password: 857959

 

Seminar 2 - Bereavement Behind Bars: A Phenomenological Approach to Bereavement in Prison Research

This time, Tia Simanovic will present on her doctoral research: ‘A Phenomenological Approach to Bereavement in Prison Research’

Here are the joining details for this seminar – please do not share these on social media:

https://strath.zoom.us/j/95408767577 Password: 027744

If however, you have colleagues or partners external to the University of Strathclyde who might be interested in attending, please feel free to share the following Eventbrite link

Thank you in advance for your continued support.

Seminar 3 - Three Short Presentations

This seminar, chaired by Prof. Daniela Sime, includes three short presentations from Amy Tucker, Ross Gibson and  Ailsa Anderson.

Amy Tucker: A Snowflake’s Chance in Hell: Young People and Structural Mental Health Stigma

Ross Gibson: LEGO Serious Play as a Methodological Tool

Ailsa Anderson: Protecting Disabled Children: How Nurses and Health Visitors Respond to Child Protection

Here are the joining details for this seminar – 

https://strath.zoom.us/j/95301114080  Password: 988530

If however, you do have colleagues or partners external to the University of Strathclyde who might be interested in attending, please feel free to share the Eventbrite link 

 

ABSTRACT DETAILS:

Amy Tucker’s presentation 'A Snowflake’s Chance in Hell: Young People and Structural Mental Health Stigma ' will discuss the theoretical motivations and findings from her PhD thesis. This qualitative study aimed to investigate young people’s understandings and experiences of structural mental health stigma in Scotland. For this presentation she draws on the data from 11 interviews and 3 focus groups with young people (age 25 and under). The accounts of young people’s daily experiences of mental health stigma illuminate the discourses that construct young people and their mental health. This seminar will discuss how the accounts of young people in Scotland has added to our understandings of stigma as a structural force of inequality.

Ross Gibson 's presentation will consider the role of LEGO Serious Play as a methodological tool when undertaking research with children and young people, and in particular, those accommodated in secure care. LEGO Serious Play is a means of team building, idea sharing and communication created by the LEGO organisation in the early 2000s. It has since been utilised within the worlds of both business and education, benefiting from the ubiquitous nature of the toy and its infinite potential to represent or symbolise both concrete and abstract concepts. In response to open ended questions on the chosen subject, the participant is invited to use LEGO bricks to produce artefacts which act as a proxy for their answer, leading to discussion where the participant may be able to articulate the meanings, metaphors or memories that the artefact represents. This presentation will consider the role of LEGO Serious Play as a methodological tool when undertaking research with children and young people, and in particular those children accommodated within secure care. If possible, please have five LEGO bricks with you during this presentation.

Ailsa Anderson will then present her research on 'Protecting Disabled Children: How Nurses and Health Visitors Respond to Child Protection' . Disabled children are significantly more likely to experience maltreatment than non-disabled children (Jones et al, 2012). However, research on professional and service responses suggests that professionals may fail to recognise, report, or escalate child protection concerns involving disabled children (Stalker et al, 2010; Stalker et al, 2015; Taylor et al, 2015). This presentation will explore the findings of Ailsa's PhD which looks at how nurses and health visitors negotiate and respond to child protection issues with disabled children and their families. Drawing on relational ethics and ethics of care frameworks, this presentation will explore the theme ‘The Ethics of Care and Response: Relationships as meaningful action’. The presentation will highlight the importance of relationships and relational capacities in nurses and health visitors' everyday protective work with families and disabled children. Ailsa suggests that it is within relationship and through relational capacities that nurses and health visitors come to know, act, and respond to situations of need, risk and harm with families and disabled children.

Seminar 4 - The "three planet problem" of female genital cutting (FGC) protection

For our fourth seminar in the series, Emmaleena Käkelä will present her doctoral research on: The “three planet problem” of female genital cutting (FGC) protection: Contradictions in professional approaches to protecting FGC-affected migrant women and girls at risk

This seminar is chaired by Neil Quinn, Reader, School of Social Work and Social Policy, and Co-Director of the Centre for Health Policy, at the University of Strathclyde.

Abstract:

In the last two decades, the issue of female genital cutting (FGC) has become subject to considerable public and policy attention. As a result of the global instabilities, “migration crisis” and rising inter-cultural tensions in Western societies, FGC and other gendered cultural practices have been increasingly harnessed in the defence of anti-immigration sentiments and the growing opposition to multiculturalism. Furthermore, the failure to secure a successful FGC prosecution in Britain until 2019 has been accompanied by long-standing critique against statutory service complacency and inaction to protect girls from FGC.

This presentation problematises these trends by arguing that the collision of anti-FGC and anti-immigration discourses underpins statutory service failures to recognise FGC-affected women’s and their children’s simultaneous needs for protection. In drawing from participatory doctoral research which has engaged with key informants and FGC-affected women, I illustrate the insensitive and hypervigilant responses that immigration control and statutory services adopt in responding to the threat of FGC facing women and their daughters. I adapt Marianne Hester’s (2011) “Three Planet Model” to conceptualise how fragmentated professional discourses and approaches confront FGC-affected women with impossible choices about how they should act to ensure safety for themselves and their daughters. The findings illustrate how dominant representations of FGC and FGC-affected women, the intersectional erasures in service provision and disregard towards the lived experiences of displacement perpetuate ongoing trauma in the lives of FGC-affected women and constrain women’s agency to protect their daughters from FGC.

Seminar 5 - Dr Jeff Hanna & Dr Robert Porter

Chaired by Prof. Daniela Sime, we will be hearing from Dr Jeff Hanna on 'Facilitating Family Support When a Parent of Dependent Children is at End of Life'.  We will then hear from Dr Robert Porter, Research Lead at CELCIS, and learn about his findings from a Rapid Consultation on Remote Consultation on Remote Children's Hearings, a  study undertaken in collaboration with colleagues from CYCJ. 

Joining details for this event are: PLEASE DO NOT SHARE THESE DETAILS WITH EXTERNAL PARTNERS

https://strath.zoom.us/j/92649000637  

Meeting ID: 926 4900 0637

Password: 367425

Thank you for your continued support. Hope to see as many of you who are in a position to make it as possible.

ABSTRACTS

Jeff Hanna: Facilitating family support when a parent of dependent children is at end of life

Introduction: Parents are often uncertain if, how, when they should prepare their children for the inevitable death of mum or dad. Parents often feel it is protecting their children by not telling them mum or dad is eventually going to die from cancer. Children less prepared for the death of a parent are more susceptive to poorer psychosocial adjustment in later life. This study aimed to explore how parents can be best supported when a parent with cancer is at end of life from cancer and has dependent children.

Methods: An interpretative qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured interviews. Four sample groups were involved, including parents at end of life, bereaved parents health and social care professionals and funeral directors. Data were analysed thematically.

Results: Parents often live in ‘parallel worlds’ throughout the end of life period. In one world, ‘living in the moment’, cherishing the ordinariness of family life, remaining hopeful treatment will prolong life, whilst adapting as the illness unfolds. The other world presents as ‘intermitted glimpses that death is approaching’, shadowed with painful emotional concerns surrounding their children and the future. Most health and social care professionals were unaware of the experiences for families when a parent of dependent children is at end of life, and often considered the provision of support as ‘not my role’. At the end, death rapidly approached for families, characterised as suddenly ‘falling off the cliff’; placing significant demands on the well-parent. Funeral directors were reported as ‘picking up the pieces’ in the immediate bereavement period when they became involved.

Conclusions: Amidst challenges, clinicians should provide parents with clear information surrounding a poor prognosis, so families can plan and prepare for parental death. There is a need for health and social care professionals to engage, encourage and equip parents, as they prepare their children throughout the end of life experience for the inevitable death of a parent. A number of recommendations will be discussed.

Robert Porter: Rapid Consultation on Remote Children’s Hearings

In August 2020, CELCIS, the Centre for Excellence for Children’s Care and Protection, and CYCJ, the Children and Young People’s Centre for Justice, collaborated to conduct a rapid consultation on experiences of taking part in Children’s Hearings via video technology (‘virtual hearings’). Virtual hearings were rapidly introduced as part of the response to the Covid-19 pandemic in early 2020. We collected experiences from over 270 individuals, including all major stakeholder groups, and analysed their responses. Our findings highlighted challenges and benefits to virtual hearings, as well as good practice to improve experiences. The presentation will present the results of the rapid consultation and how our recommendations might help improve both virtual and blended hearings now and into the future.

Full report: https://bit.ly/2YDFquf
Report for children and young people: https://bit.ly/36CGl2k 
Report for parents and carers: https://bit.ly/3jcTvIh

I look forward to seeing as many of you who can make it, and thank you for your continued support.

Seminar 6 - Practice learning in Social Work during COVID-19

In this inclusive seminar, Fiona Stansfield, Practice Learning Manager, University of Strathclyde, offers 'reflections on the opportunities and challenges of practice learning during COVID-19'. This seminar, will be chaired by Professor Trish Hafford-Letchfield, Head of the School of Social Work and Social Policy.

In March 2020 social work student placements across Scotland where suspended. Since then, social work practice has had to adapt to new ways of engaging with individuals and delivering supports and services. Therefore, it is no surprise that social work placements and social work students have also changed and adapted to new ways of practice learning.

This webinar will be an opportunity to hear from social work students whom where the first to return to placements during the pandemic. They will talk about what that experience was like for them and the opportunities and challenges they encountered. It will also be an opportunity to hear from practice educators who supported and assessed students on placement. These experiences will demonstrate the innovative approaches to social work placements that have emerged through the pandemic and how they have been successful in training the social workers of tomorrow.

This seminar will be of interest to practice educators, social workers and social work students, and social work academics. It will have significant relevance to others studying for, working on, or leading professional higher education courses.

Joining details for this event are: PLEASE DO NOT SHARE THESE DETAILS WITH EXTERNAL PARTNERS

https://strath.zoom.us/j/94093542549   

Meeting ID: 940 9354 2549

Password: 193950

If you have external partners or associates that you think might have an interest in attending this seminar, please feel free to share the following link to our Eventbrite page.

I look forward to seeing as many of you who can make it, and thank you for your continued support.

Seminar 10 - The Contribution of Volunteering to Scotland's Health and Wellbeing

We invite you to attend our 10th seminar, from the School of Social Work and Social Policy on 5th May 2021 between 12 noon and 1pm. In this seminar, chaired by Professor Bernard HarrisMatthew Linning and and Debbie Maltman of the Research and Evaluation Team at Volunteer Scotland (@VolScotland) we discuss their research exploring The Contribution of Volunteering to Scotland's Health and Wellbeing.

Abstract: Matthew and Debbie will start the seminar by ‘setting the scene’ for volunteering – how we define it, who is engaged demographically and who benefits. The main topic will be an investigation of the health and wellbeing benefits for both the beneficiaries of volunteering and the volunteers themselves. It will explore the inter-related impacts on physical health, mental health and social isolation and loneliness. The talk will conclude with a review of recent evidence on the contribution of volunteering to Scotland’s health and wellbeing during COVID-19.

If you are interested in attending this seminar, please click on the following link to our Eventbrite page.

About our presenters:

Matthew Linning leads the Research and Evaluation Team at Volunteer Scotland. Over the last seven years he has published research on volunteering in relation to Scotland’s historic environment, youth volunteering, UK and Scottish volunteering participation, health and wellbeing, and diversity and inclusion. A cross-cutting theme which has emerged from this research is the importance of volunteering to the health and wellbeing of volunteers and society more widely. Matthew’s current research on the impact of COVID-19 also highlights the critical role volunteering plays in supporting those most in need in society.

Debbie Maltman works in the Research and Evaluation Team at Volunteer Scotland focusing mainly on quantitative data analysis. Debbie joined the Research and Evaluation team in October 2018, after completing a summer project with Volunteer Scotland as part of her MSc in Data Science for Business, which was awarded the Data Lab student project of the year (2017/18). During Covid-19 Debbie has been focused on collating the existing evidence on the volunteer response in Scotland to COVID-19, including quantitative analysis of a number of Scottish Covid-19 Surveys and qualitative evidence gathered from scanning media and social media from the outset of the pandemic.

Seminar 11 - Mental Health Literacy & Stigma; Recovery & Homelessness; MAD Studies

I’m pleased to invite you to attend our 11th seminar, from the School of Social Work and Social Policy on 26/05/2021 between 12 noon and 1pm. In this seminar, chaired by Neil Quinn, Co-Director of the Centre for Health Policy, we will hear three presentations on the themes of Mental Health Literacy & Stigma; Recovery & Chronic Homelessness; MAD Studies, Citizenship and Social Movements: Transatlantic Studies. Our presenters are Dr Claire GoodfellowDr Dimitar Karadzhov; and Dr Kirsten MacLean

If you have external partners or associates that you think might have an interest in attending this seminar, please feel free to share the following link to our Eventbrite page

Abstracts:

Dr Claire Goodfellow: The Impacts of Mental Health Literacy and Stigma on Adolescent Help-Seeking.

Despite an increase in the prevalence of poor mental health among adolescents, there is a notable lack of help-seeking among this age group. Around two-thirds of young people with a mental health problem will not seek formal help when experiencing a mental health problem. Stigma and low mental health literacy (MHL; knowledge of mental health problems and their treatment) are known barriers to help-seeking.  Despite this, less is known about how MHL and stigma interact and impact on the help-seeking intentions of adolescents. 

 My research aimed to investigate how differing forms of MHL, as well as personal stigma, and perceived stigma from specific groups (parents and friend) would impact on help-seeking among young people. Results demonstrated that while MHL was associated with reduced personal stigma, it was not necessarily associated with improved help-seeking intention. My research was novel in looking at discrete components of MHL, and identifying that specific forms of literacy were associated with decreased help-seeking. Perceived stigma from both friends and parents was associated with reduced help-seeking, though personal stigma was not. Based on these findings it is recommended that MHL initiatives focus on effective treatments and recovery, and shift from a problematisation narrative which focuses on specific mental health problems. Further recommendations include development of peer-led mental health strategies for adolescents.

Dr Dimitar Karadzhov: 'It's a few different things that make it whole': Understanding Personal Recovery in Individuals Transitioning out of Chronic Homelessness: Insights from a Transatlantic Qualitative Study

Individuals with serious mental illness who are homeless are a client group with complex but often misunderstood and unmet health and social care needs. The experience of personal recovery amidst the chronically disempowering conditions of poverty and homelessness has been severely under-researched. This presentation will provide an overview of a transatlantic qualitative investigation with 18 homeless services clients in Glasgow and New York City. Combining smartphone technology, phenomenology and critical realism, this study set out to unravel the socio-structural and contextual influences shaping recovery, as well as the ways in which individuals navigated and negotiated those to enable better well-being and recovery. Implications for re-envisioning the recovery concept, as well as for transforming the delivery of humanising, person-centred services, will be discussed.

Dr Kirsten MacLean: MAD Studies Research: Exploring Citizenship, Social Movement Learning and Mental Health

Activists and people with lived experience have long argued that mental health is a social, cultural, and political issue.  This transatlantic, qualitative research privileges how people with lived experience make sense of the intersections between mental health, citizenship, and education. This project drew on documentary analysis, arts based workshops and oral history interviews with people involved with two very different projects in Scotland and the United States: Mad People's History and Identity, a critical pedagogy project based at Queen Margaret University in partnership with CAPS Independent Advocacy and NHS Lothian and the Citizens Community Collaborative a community project based on a "citizenship" model of mental health, developed by the Program for Recovery and Community Health (PRCH) Yale University, New Haven, CT.  Using a Mad Studies lens and drawing from the bricolage tradition of emancipatory research, this study aimed to understand more deeply what role "social movement learning" has in facilitating personal and political agency. Themes of the relational, validation and love are identified as important for developing collective identity as well as collective and political agency. Findings also linked validation to theories of epistemic justice, suggesting that in Scotland particularly validation came not just from the relational but from contact with counter hegemonic understandings of mental illness. 

I look forward to seeing as many of you who can make it, and thank you for your continued support.

Seminar 12 - Working Differently with Adults: The Birmingham Experience

Our next seminar, which will take place on 16th June between 12-1pm. Chaired by Professor Trish Hafford-Letchfield, our 12th seminar, of the School of Social Work and Social Policy Seminar Series focuses on Professor Barbara Fawcett research into working co-productively with adults: Working Differently with Adults: The Birmingham Experience.

Abstract:

Turning rhetoric into reality and fully embracing the principles and practice of the Care Act 2014 in innovative, citizen-focused and creative ways has been a journey constructively embraced in Birmingham over the last two years. This has been a journey with critical learning points which incorporate theoretical reflection, managerial and practitioner innovation and an emphasis on citizen-focused co-production. This article considers the context, examines the nature of the change process and appraises the findings from the eighteen-month evaluation. All of these learning points and the process of change itself are eminently transferrable to other Local Authorities operating in the four countries which comprise the UK as well as to the international arena.

Please register here for the event Eventbrite page.

I look forward to seeing as many of you who can make it, and thank you for your continued support.

Seminar 13 Hidden Harm Among Scotland’s Children and Families? Making Sense of COVID Data.

In a small change to our running order, I am pleased to share details of our next seminar, which will take place on 14th July between 12-1pm. In this seminar, Alex McTier, Evidence and Evaluation Specialist at CELCIS will share his research into Hidden Harm Among Scotland’s Children and Families? Making Sense of COVID Data.

 

Abstract:

The weekly Vulnerable Children and Young People data submission from local authorities to Scottish Government has raised questions about a disconnect between higher levels of early stage child protection activity (e.g. increasing child protection concerns) and yet lower numbers of children becoming registered on the Child Protection Register or becoming looked after. Could this indicate instances of hidden harm where children and families’ needs are not being fully assessed and then met? This session presents CELCIS’ research findings from interviews with 7 Scottish local authority areas and analysis of wider national data and evidence to help explain these divergent trends and what future priorities for action might be.

If you are interested in attending this seminar, please register here on our Eventbrite page.

I look forward to seeing as many of you who can make it, and thank you for your continued support.