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Climate Change Litigation InitiativeScenarios

National rapporteurs were asked to undertake an overview of climate change litigation in a specific country exploring 6 different scenarios, which can be found below. The outcomes of this work was presented to the coordinators as national reports, which were then amended into book chapters for the edited collection published by Springer under the title “Comparative Climate Change Litigation: Beyond the Usual Suspects”, forthcoming in 2020. The scenarios have been condensed into three simpler scenarios for the purposes of C2LI.

Snowdonia has committed to a 30% reduction in greenhouse gases by 2030 and has included such a pledge in its Nationally Determined Contribution under the Paris Agreement. Civil society in Snowdonia are increasingly concerned that the national climate policies planned by Snowdonia do not match the ambition present in its NDC. Against such a background, can an individual in your legal system bring a case against a public actor that allegedly does not comply with its international climate change obligations?

Snowdonia’s Constitution includes a provision giving its citizen a right to a healthy environment. Climate change will impact mainly on future generations and thanks to increased awareness in schools, children in Snowdonia are concerned about what lays ahead and about their human rights enjoyment, which may be hampered by rising sea levels, etc…  Against such a background, can an individual in your legal system bring a case against a public actor that allegedly does not comply with climate change obligations (national or international), on human rights grounds?

The city of Bowmore in Snowdonia is considering redeveloping an abandoned area into a new airport. Major revenue and increased financial flows are arguments in favour of the major infrastructure development. On the other hand, the new airport will lead to more air traffic, which will lead to more greenhouse gas emissions. Furthermore, there are discrepancies as to whether the city of Bowmore has complied with a number of procedural obligations related to the development of the major infrastructure (public participation, environmental impact assessment, ie). Against such a background, can an individual bring a case in your legal system against a public actor that allegedly does not comply with procedural national obligations leading to a rise in greenhouse gas emissions?

After three years in a row of major floods, the city of Bowmore in Snowdonia has decided to enhance its flood resilience infrastructure. It is also considering changing its regulations regarding construction near the coast due to coastal erosion. Individuals in the community are concerned that these measures are not strong enough since science is clearly showing that climate change will lead to more devastating impacts in Bowmore in the short and especially in the medium and long term. Furthermore, there are discrepancies as to whether the city of Bowmore has complied with a number of procedural obligations related to the development of planning of its flood resilience infrastructure and new coastal policies (public participation, environmental impact assessment, ie). Against such a background, can an individual bring a case in your legal system against a public actor that allegedly does not comply with procedural national obligations leading to a failure to climate change adaptation?

Aluminium has been a major industry in Snowdonia for many generations. This carbon intensive sector of the economy provides jobs for an important part of the population. A concerned group of citizens raises the issue of climate change and of environmental health due to the emissions related to the production of aluminium in Snowdonia. Against such a background, can an individual bring a case against a private actor whose acts lead to a large rise in greenhouse gas emissions?

Pension funds in Snowdonia invest in all sort of profitable activities, including fossil fuels. Citizens in Snowdonia have joined the global divestment movement and are calling pension funds to move away (ie divest) from climate change unfriendly portfolios. Against such a background, can an individual bring a case against a pension fund (or a similar entity) whose actions (ie investments) contribute to a global rise in greenhouse gas emissions or difficult adaptation to climate change?