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Optical imaging of turbulent flames: application to industrial gas fired furnaces

The aim of the project is to use novel laser diagnostic techniques to image the flow field in turbulent flames to improve the understanding of flame dynamics with particular application to heat-treating gas furnaces.

Number of places

1

Funding

Home fee, Stipend

Opens

19 July 2017

Deadline

28 February 2018

Duration

3.5 years

Eligibility

Candidates applying should have (or expect to achieve) a minimum 2.1 undergraduate degree in a relevant discipline, applicants must be able to demonstrate enthusiasm, resourcefulness and a mature approach to learning. A high level of motivation to perform advanced experiments involving custom built optical set-ups is essential. Experience in programming (e.g. Matlab), is desirable. Knowledge and experience in the following areas are preferred: Chemical/Mechanical/Electrical Engineering, Physics, Physical Chemistry.

Project Details

The aim of the project is to use novel laser diagnostic techniques to image the flow field in turbulent flames to improve the understanding of flame dynamics with particular application to heat-treating gas furnaces. The experimental results will be used for validation of computational models developed by a post-graduate researcher working on a linked project running in parallel.

Gas furnaces are commonly used in the manufacturing industry for the heat treatment of metals. Heat treated parts are used in a variety of industries (aerospace, automotive, naval) and the quality of the material is of paramount importance for its safe and reliable operation. At the same time, heat-treatment furnaces consume relatively large amounts of energy and produce large emissions both of which need to be optimised. Both the quality of the treated material and the furnace efficiency depend strongly on the flow, temperature, and species concentration fields.

The PhD student’s work will involve close collaboration, and time spent, at the Advanced Forming Research Centre (AFRC), as well as regular meetings with the industrial partner. Furthermore, the work will benefit from access to high-power laser imaging facilities at the University of Strathclyde. In addition, the student will be enrolled for the Postgraduate Certificate in Researcher Development (PGCert). This will serve as an additional qualification to help develop the student’s skills, networks but also career prospects.

Funding Details

Funding is available through an EPSRC doctoral training grant (DTG) with a duration of 3.5 years. This studentship will provide full fees and stipend for a citizen of the UK or the EU. Priority will be given to students applying by July 31st 2017.

Contact us

Ms Jacqueline Brown

+44(0) 141 574 5319

chemeng-pg-admissions@strath.ac.uk

James Weir Building, 75 Montrose Street, Glasgow, G1 1XJ

How to apply

Apply for this PhD project here.

Please quote the project title in your application.