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High throughput optical mesoscopy for quantitative screening of novel antimicrobial compounds

This studentship will involve extending the capability of the Mesolens to support super-resolution imaging modes using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and structured illumination microscopy to resolve the mode of action of antimicrobial peptides in thousands of cells simultaneously.

Number of places

2

Funding

Home fee, Stipend

Opens

10 January 2018

Deadline

28 February 2018

Duration

4 Years

Eligibility

Qualifications:
BSc (Hons) 2:1 or equivalent degree in physics, chemistry, biology or a related subject
Funding:
Scholarships (fees and stipend) available on a competitive basis for UK/EU students, please contact supervisor for details (g.mcconnell@strath.ac.uk)

Project Details

Antimicrobial Resistance is one the biggest health challenges facing us today. Research is urgently required to support the rapid discovery and screening of novel antibiotics and to reduce the time and cost involved in bringing these to market. This project seeks to develop key underpinning imaging and analysis techniques to allow effective screening and study of novel antimicrobial candidates, specifically antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) which represent possibly the most promising class of antimicrobial agents.

Existing assays such as minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) suffer from poor reproducibility and cannot provide detailed information about the mode of action of AMPs and the diversity of bacterial responses. Current high resolution optical imaging approaches used at NPL (such as super-resolution microscopy) allow detailed visualisation of only a small population of cells, resulting in low throughput and poor measurement statistics.

This project seeks to leverage high throughput imaging techniques to solve these limitations and provide a powerful new capability for assessing antimicrobials.

Prof McConnell has developed a new giant lens called the Mesolens which gives images of hundreds or thousands of mammalian cells in a single image with diffraction-limited resolution. We aim here to extend the capability of the Mesolens to support super-resolution imaging modes using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and structured illumination microscopy (SIM). These methods will improve the resolution by a factor of approximately 2 in the lateral direction and 4 in the axial direction to resolve the mode of action of AMPs (such as membrane pore formation) in thousands of cells simultaneously. 

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