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Theory and simulation of micro-resonator devices for quantum technologies

We explore nonlinear quantum regimes of the coupling between light and matter for ultra-low power micro and nano-lasers. These are promising candidates to achieve high efficiency, high speed, and a small footprint.

Number of places

1

Funding

Home fee, Stipend

Opens

24 April 2018

Eligibility

Qualifications:

BSc (Hons) 2:1 or equivalent degree in physics/chemistry…..

Funding:

Scholarships (fees and stipend) available on a competitive basis for UK/EU students, please contact supervisor for details.

Project Details

There is a technological race to design, simulate, test and develop new devices for quantum technology applications in sensing, frequency standard and optical information processing. This project focuses on the theory and simulation of novel quantum technology devices based on micro-resonators in close connection with experimental work done at the Universities of Stanford, Strathclyde (Dr. K. Lagoudakis, Dr. A Hurtado), Nice (Dr. G. Lippi, Dr. M. Giudici), Auckland (Dr. S. Coen, Dr. M. Erkintalo and Dr. S. Murdoch) and at the National Physical Laboratories (NPL) (Dr. P. Del’Haye). On one side, we explore nonlinear quantum regimes of the coupling between light and matter for ultra-low power, quantum dot based nano-lasers. Semiconductor-based light-emitting devices compatible with optical and electronic integration are receiving increasing attention, and in particular quantum dot nano-lasers appear as promising candidates to achieve high efficiency, high speed, and a small footprint. Coupling these devices with structured light or light carrying angular momentum is also very promising for information processing. On the other side, we model and simulate photonic devices based on nonlinear micro-ring resonators for frequency comb generation, applications of cavity solitons and photon entanglement. The universality of the quantum optics techniques developed in the CNQO group at Strathclyde allows us to describe light–matter interaction in the very different materials and optical wavelengths micro-resonators used in the Stanford, Strathclyde, Nice, Auckland and NPL devices. 

The investigation of these new devices is supported by our development of new models and novel numerical techniques that make extensive use of the computational facilities of the CNQO group and allow for the investigation of realistic experimental conditions. The CNQO group at Strathclyde is in a unique and strategic position world-wide having pioneered computational modelling of lasers, photonic devices and even Bose-Einstein condensates. An integral part of the project is the comparison of the theory/simulation results with the experimental data.

This research would make important contributions to the development of quantum technologies for measurement, sensing and information processing. Strathclyde plays a central role in the UK landscape within this field, participating in all four of the national Quantum Technologies hubs, and has identified this as key area of development. In addition, this research is directly within the scope of several international partnerships, such as the International Max Planck Partnership for Measurement and Sensing at the Quantum Limit.

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