News

Professor Keith Bell appointed to Committee on Climate Change

Ice bergs in the Arctic Sea.

The University of Strathclyde’s Professor Keith Bell has been appointed to the UK’s Committee on Climate Change (CCC).

The CCC is an independent, statutory body established under the Climate Change Act 2008 to advise the UK Government and Devolved Administrations on emissions targets.

Professor Bell, of the Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, joins seven other members of the CCC, which is chaired by Lord Deben, and will serve a five-year term and commit a minimum of two days per month to the role.

Professor Keith Bell

Professor Bell said: “The science is clear, man-made climate change is a real phenomenon and represents a significant threat to the environment, lifestyles and economies of the world.

“As one of the world’s leading economies, the UK has a responsibility to play its part in tackling this challenge.

“I look forward to working with the other members of the Committee and bringing my experience in energy systems, specifically electricity systems, and my knowledge of the energy landscape in Scotland to help advise the UK Government and Devolved Administrations on how best to meet our commitment to reducing carbon emissions.

“Real progress is being made around the world through decarbonising electricity, so the massive challenge now is decarbonising transport and heat.

“It’s a privilege to become a member of the CCC but also a big responsibility in light of the importance of the issues that it is addressing. “

Professional standing

Professor Sir Jim McDonald, Principal & Vice-Chancellor of the University of Strathclyde, said: “The appointment of Keith to the CCC is testament to his expertise and professional standing in the energy sector and reflects well on the Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering and the University as a whole.

The quality of our research and teaching in power and energy systems technology, policy and economics has been acknowledged for many decades; Keith’s appointment is the latest recognition of the contribution Strathclyde is making to address one of the most pressing challenges of the 21st Century.”

Professor Bell replaces Professor Jim Skea who stepped down from the committee in December 2018 after more than a decade of service.
Lord Deben, CCC Chairman, said: “I am thrilled to welcome Professor Keith Bell to the Committee on Climate Change. Keith brings extensive experience from his work within the power sector and his expertise will be vital as we look to the solutions for decarbonising transport and heat.

“I’d also like to express my sincere thanks to Professor Jim Skea. As a founding CCC member, Jim has been instrumental in the Committee’s work and subsequent success over the last ten years. The Committee has truly benefitted from Jim’s insight and knowledge, which in turn has helped to ensure our recommendations to Government and Parliament have been firmly rooted in the science.”

Professor Bell joined Strathclyde in 2005, having previously worked as a researcher in Bath, Manchester and Naples and as a system development engineer in the electricity supply industry in Britain.

He was appointed to the Scottish Power Chair in Smart Grids in late 2013 and became one of the co-Directors of the UK Energy Research Centre in 2014.

In July 2018, along with Ian Cotton, he became Scientific Director of the Electrical Infrastructure Research Hub established by the University of Strathclyde with the Offshore Renewable Energy Catapult and the University of Manchester.

He is an invited expert member of CIGRE Study Committee C1 on System Development and Economics, a member of the Executive Board of the Power Systems Computation Conference and a member of the Executive Committee of the IET Power Academy, an initiative to promote electric power engineering as a graduate career in the UK.

He is a Chartered Engineer and at various times has advised the Scottish Government, the Republic of Ireland government, Ofgem and the UK Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on power systems issues.