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BAJournalism & Creative Writing & Law

Why this course?

You can combine journalism and creative writing in one programme taught by internationally-recognised writers, academics and experienced journalists.

From crises in the Middle East to the economic and political situation at home, journalism informs our view of the world and shapes our decisions.

There are a number of ways you can study law at Strathclyde, one such way being the BA degree in combination with another subject. Please note that studying law within the BA degree will not qualify you for entry to the legal profession. For professional qualifications in law students follow the LLB programme.

Law is concerned with the study of the obligations, duties and rights which every member of society has in relation to one another and to the state.

The study of law is regarded not as purely vocational, but part of a broader education. Please note, however, that studying law within the BA degree will not qualify you for entry to the legal profession. For professional qualifications in law students follow the LLB programme.

Our BA degrees in Humanities & Social Sciences are initially broad-based. In Year 1 you will study three subjects, including your chosen subject(s).

Journalism & Creative Writing

What you’ll study

Year 1

You'll be introduced to core concepts in both journalism and creative writing and explore the connections between the two areas of writing.

Year 2

Students in second year explore the structure of media institutions and develop awareness of writing techniques common to journalists and creative writers.

Year 3

Areas of study include script writing and features journalism. You will also study research techniques for writers and journalists.

Year 4

As an Honours student you will prepare a portfolio over the course of the year. There is also the opportunity to take advanced Honours taught classes in journalism and creative writing and a research-based dissertation or special project on a relevant topic.

Work placement

Although there is no obligation for students to undertake work placements, staff are regularly contacted by newspaper editors seeking help from students with various projects. So there are a good number of opportunities for work experience during the course of study at Strathclyde.

Short work placements are occasionally available to students of journalism during summer periods. These are not part of the course and entry is often competitive. Recent placements have included the communications division of the Scottish Government.

Major projects

Journalism staff are involved in a number of projects involving investigative journalism, digital journalism, health journalism and media talk, and are regular contributors to broadcast and print media. Staff in journalism have also been involved in the delivery of a recent Massive Open Online Course (MOOC).

Creative writing staff take part in many of Scotland’s literary festivals, including the International Edinburgh Book Festival, Aye Write and others. Postgraduate students recently organised two creative writing conferences and staff organised and hosted a major international conference on poetry and the visual arts in association with Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery.

Facilities

The department of journalism and creative writing are located in the Lord Hope building, in the centre of Glasgow just a few minutes from the railway stations, bus stops, shops, and restaurants. This location is ideal as it provides a social hub and access to student services such as the library, cafés, meeting areas and exhibition spaces.

Many of the classes in journalism take place in dedicated news classrooms.

Postgraduate study

Our taught graduate programmes combine academic excellence in journalism studies with professional education to industry standards. We offer taught Masters degrees in:

We also offer various research degrees including an MRes in Creative Writing.

Law

What you'll study

Year 1

The first-year class, Introduction to Law & Legal Obligations, introduces you to the laws of contract and delict, which are the essential building blocks of most other areas of law, to the court systems and judicial decision-making, and to the law-making process in the UK.

Years 2, 3 & 4

You select classes according to your interests from a wide range of options, including Human Rights, Environmental Law, Criminal Law, Public International Law, and Law, Film & Popular Culture.

Course content

Year 1

Journalism & Creative Writing

Journalism & Creative Writing 1A

The class introduces key concepts in the theory and practice of creative writing. During the course of this semester we focus mainly on the exploration and production of short stories.  This module aims to:

  • introduce you to the basic skills and techniques involved in writing short fiction
  • develop good practice related to the professional presentation of creative work
  • encourage you to discuss creative work collaboratively and constructively
  • introduce you to the skills involved in reflecting critically on creative products and processes

You're introduced to core concepts in both journalism and creative writing and explore the connections between the two areas of writing.

Journalism & Creative Writing 1B

This class introduces key concepts in the theory and practice of journalism. It focuses mainly on the examination and production of journalism as a form of storytelling.

You'll be introduced to the fundamental skills needed to write effective news and features and will have the opportunity to practise these in the workshops.

Law

Criminal Law

This course considers everything from the theory of why and how someone is held responsible for criminal actions, to many specific crimes, including murder, the less serious crimes of personal violence, crimes of dishonesty, breach of the peace and attempting to pervert the course of justice.

Law & Society

This class engages with some challenging problems faced by law within contemporary society. It introduces students to some aspects of the social, political, and ethical conditions in which law operates. It deals with the interaction of law with justice, politics, morals and equality. The course will examine the role and challenges of law in times of social change. The course is structured around three key themes:

  • legal reasoning
  • law & politics
  • law & social change

 

Legal Methods

The aims of this class are to:

  • provide students with a basic knowledge of the history, structure and institutions of the Scottish legal system
  • provide students with the skills required to find, interpret and analyse the law applicable in Scotland, from all their various sources
  • introduce students to competing conceptions of law
  • introduce students to legal reasoning
Voluntary Obligations: Contract & Promises

While the most obvious aim of this course is to familiarise students with Scottish contract law and voluntary obligations, this aim may be divided into a number of sub-aims. They are as follows:

  • to place voluntary obligations within the general framework of Scots Law
  • to place the Scots law of voluntary obligations within its European context
  • to analyse and explain how contracts and promises are formed
  • to analyse and explain how voluntary obligations may be vitiated and on what grounds their validity may be challenged
  • to analyse and explain the substance of contracts and how the inclusion and exclusion of rights and liabilities is circumscribed by law
  • to analyse and explain how contracts break down or otherwise come to an end and the remedies available when they do
Public Law 1

Following on from the introduction to the constitution – its key actors, institutions and their functions – in Public Law 1, students taking Public Law 2 will build upon that knowledge here: first by focusing on the ways in which legal (judicial review) and quasi-legal (tribunals, public inquiries, ombudsmen) bodies supervise the exercise of constitutional and administrative decision making; secondly, by a detailed analysis of the political and legal mechanisms which exist for the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms. As such, Public Law 2 is concerned with the abuse of power, and the ways and means by which power can be limited and held to account – whether that is the power of a golf club to suspend an unruly member, the power of a local authority to order the compulsory purchase of privately owned property, or the power of the Prime Minister to wage war.

Year 2

Journalism & Creative Writing

Journalism 2

How we gather news, how we write news and how we consume news is changing. The aim of this class is to introduce you to classic and modern newsgathering methods in the 21st century. That means you'll be combining the best of the old with the most relevant and effective of the new.

The foundation stone of journalism is news. That’s what drives newspapers, magazines, TV, radio and online content. So, we’ll be looking at what news is, where it comes from and how we go about gathering it ourselves. The next step is to write news. Therefore, we’ll spend some time examining how best to write news for print and online platforms.

The class is a careful mixture of studying journalism and doing journalism because understanding what you are doing and why you are doing it is just as important as learning how to do it.

Creative Writing 2

You'll study contemporary literature from the perspective of the writer, analysing the craft of writing, as opposed to studying these texts in terms of their historical or cultural context, as you might be familiar with from English Studies classes.

The key objective of a creative writing seminar is to begin to understand the mechanics of how contemporary writers put their work together. Some of this analysis will reinforce and build upon lessons learned in first year relating to the basics of structure, tone, narrative, characterisation etc.

This class seeks to stretch you further, aiming to achieve a more sophisticated understanding of what makes a good story work. As well as working on short fiction, the class studies a novel and introduces some examples of flash fiction and short fiction. There's also a unit designed to introduce you to the basics of writing good contemporary poetry in free verse style and one that introduces the craft of dramatic writing.

The second hour of each class is generally a workshop, with elements of the texts being studied in the first hour used as a platform for writing exercises, group work and discussion in the second hour. Primarily, the second hour of the class focuses on you doing writing of your own. You'll also start to develop rewriting and editing skills. 

Journalism and Creative Writing 2

This class is an introduction to creative nonfiction. It looks at writing that relates to the self, such as autobiography, the diary, the memoir, the lyric essay and beyond. We focus on the way writers have written about themselves and their lives, and will explore how personal experience is transformed into literary and journalistic practice.

During the semester you'll develop your own ideas into written assessments.

Law

Public Law 2

Following on from Public Law 1, Public Law 2 aims to consolidate knowledge and understanding of constitutional and administrative law. Students taking this class will require to have taken Public Law 1 in the first year. It'll build upon knowledge of the key concepts and institutions of the UK constitution. As a second year class, its rationale is to give students the opportunity to progress from an understanding of the constitution to an understanding of the role of the law in the constitutional control of public power. This course encourages students to adopt an evaluative and critical stance towards ongoing constitutional developments. The course will focus on control of administrative action, both by the judiciary and by ombudsmen. The protection of individual rights will be a key feature, focusing on judicial protection but also encompassing the role of human rights institutions in the UK and Scotland. The future control of public power will be discussed, including topical debates concerning constitutional reform in this area.

Domestic Relations

Family law concerns the control which the law exerts over domestic relationships and families; it affects everyone to a greater or lesser degree.

Topics include:

  • the legal status of children, parental responsibilities and rights and the upbringing of children - including issues in adoption and fostering, local authority care and the Children's Hearing system
  • legal consequences of marriage/civil partnership
  • divorce - including what happens to the family and its financial consequences
  • unmarried domestic relations, opposite-sex and same-sex
Commercial Law

Commercial law is a second year compulsory subject on the LLB (and LML) degree. The class provides students with an understanding of commercial law in a Scottish context. It partially meets the commercial law subject requirements and related skills outcomes of the Law Society of Scotland and the Faculty of Advocates (albeit that some of the commercial professional topics, eg sale of goods and insurance law, are dealt with by other courses).

Building on the knowledge acquired by students in first year, the general academic objective of the course is to examine the basic principles and rules concerning core aspects of commercial law, including the main principles of agency, partnership and company law, the law relating to various methods of payment (including consumer credit and bills of exchange) the rules governing the ways in which creditors can ‘secure’ repayment of a debt (eg through taking personal guarantees from third parties for repayment of the debt, or by establishing rights in security over debtor property); the basic principles of diligence; the consequences of both corporate and individual debtor inability to repay debts (corporate insolvency and personal bankruptcy respectively).

While the focus of the class is on ‘a black letter’ analysis of relevant statutory and common law in the broad commercial area, in order to aid understanding of relevant principles, the class also examines the policy rationales underlying the current law and recent and projected reforms in this area.

Involuntary Obligations: Delict & Unjustified Enrichment

The design of this class is primarily aimed at enhancing students’ ability to read cases, deal with case law and apply the techniques of case-analysis and common law development.

The student will acquire an in-depth and up to date knowledge and understanding, from both a legal and a social perspective, of the rules of law governing involuntary obligations, that is to say the law of delict and the law of unjustified enrichment.

Students will acquire the ability to apply the rules of law to particular fact situations in order to provide definitive answers to the problems exposed in these situations.

Students will develop critical and reasoning skills, giving them the ability to make and present personal and informed judgments on the rules of law and their application within the domestic legal system.

Property Trusts & Succession

The general rationale of this class is to provide students with a contemporary understanding of the law of property, trusts and succession in Scotland, and to meet Law Society of Scotland requirements in this subject-area.

EU Law

The EU law class focuses on the constitutional and institutional order of the EU as well as on the internal market. To this end, the class looks at the European integration process, the EU institutions, EU competences, the decision-making process within the EU, the principles underpinning the EU legal order and the principles governing the internal market.

Year 3

Journalism & Creative Writing

Journalism 3

We examine the techniques and art of feature writing. This means building upon key aspects of the news writing class in year 2. It also means exploring why features are important in tabloid, broadsheet and digital forms:

  • identifying what elements make a good feature article
  • how features are constructed
  • what major skills are needed to write a good feature piece

The art of feature writing has been impacted by the use of digital technology, from Tweeting to major long-form article sites. We’ll look in the lectures and, particularly in the workshop activities, at how digital technology has shaped everything including how we actually use that technology to research and source stories.

The history of feature writing in magazine, newspaper and various online forms will be studied. The class will build towards showing the links that exist between shorter feature pieces (profiles, columns etc) and longer magazine articles.

By the end of the class, you'll understand:

  • the links that exist between news writing and feature writing
  • how to tell a story within a feature article
  • how to gather research with an eye to characterisation and narrative
  • how to structure articles
  • how to use creative fictional techniques without losing sight of strict journalistic best practice techniques
The class should also be able to spot what can take a long feature article into other mediums like full-length books and multi-media projects on other digital platforms. 
Creative Writing 3

Covering the technique and craft of dramatic writing, this class looks at writing for screen and for radio, and examines how these skills can be used in fiction. We discuss a range of sources including screenplays by Harold Pinter, as well as radio plays.

Starting with the scene, the weekly workshops allow you to work on structure, plot, characterisation, dialogue and non-linear structure, which you will use as the basis for assessed pieces, which can be either screen or radio plays, or fiction. 

Journalism and Creative Writing 3

The first half of this class focuses on research informed creative non-fiction pieces including the profile, the travel piece, the obituary and the hybrid narrative. Set texts and films include work by Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace and Susan Orleans and examines how these writers have used narrative to capture real life, people and events.

In semester 2 the focus switches to journalism.

You'll attend a series of lectures and workshops which focus on the connection between using ‘real-life’ gathered raw material for journalism-based and /or fictional projects. We'll explore the complex links between non-fiction and fiction, including:

  • How can you use fictional techniques in non-fiction projects?
  • How far can you stretch the ‘rules’ of journalism?
  • What strategies must you employ when gathering material for a non-fiction project which ensures most impact for the readers?
  • How can these projects be exploited to fullest effect without losing inherent integrity and worth?

You'll learn through case-studies how the authors have used real-life as a source for their work, whether it is long-form journalism, documentaries, reportage photography, or journalism-based Hollywood movies.

The class reading list includes:

  • novels
  • adventure narratives
  • travelogues
  • novelists using non-fiction forms for social justice ends
  • novelists using journalistic research-gathering means to add realism and a factual-edge to their fictional-work

Law

Compulsory classes
Evidence

The main focus of the course is on providing an overview of how the handling and proving of facts works in law and how this interacts with the law of evidence. The emphasis is on understanding and application, rather than the learning of the specific details of legal rules.

The course has three general academic aims:

  • to introduce students to theoretical and practical issues relating to the use and proof of facts in the Scottish legal system
  • introduce students to the central concepts, rules and principles of the Scots law of Evidence
  • give students an understanding of the interrelationship between the theory, practice and law relating to the use and proof of facts in the Scottish legal system
Elective classes
Law, Film & Popular Culture
This class develops general concerns with the nature and function of law which are key elements in the wide-ranging theoretical, non-subject specific (or meta-law) classes taught within the Law School – Law and Society, Sociology of Law, Legal Theory and Criminology.
Legal Theory

The main aim of this class is to introduce students to the major theoretical ideas and values of law, and to debates about those ideas and values, thereby enhancing their understanding of law in general.

The class explores relationships between law and morality, law and society and between law and power. In doing so, the course also explores what we mean by law, morality and power. The course requires students to work on their own and make an oral presentation and trains then in concise thinking.

Housing Law

The aim of the class is to introduce the student to the law of landlord and tenant, and to concepts of housing need and market allocation of housing resources and the different ways in which such concepts are interpreted and operated in modern Britain.  The method of teaching and assessing the class is designed to enhance learning, academic and transferable skills.

International Private Law

This class aims to provide students with an understanding of the problems inherent in situations involving a foreign element and the basic concepts and principles of Scots international private law. More particularly, attention will be given to the rules which establish when the Scottish court has jurisdiction in any case involving a foreign element. The class will also determine the applicable law in cases involving international elements heard before a Scottish court and the rules on recognition and enforcement of judgments in certain contexts.

The International private law rules in relation to:

  • contract
  • delict
  • marriage
  • divorce & nullity
  • parent & child
  • property
  • insolvency & succession

This class is not recommended for Erasmus exchange students.

Competition Law

Most industrialised countries, and the European Union now have elaborate laws, rules and procedures for ensuring the maintenance of a competitive economy. This course looks at how the competition laws of the United Kingdom and the European Union affect how business operates in Britain.

If you're contemplating a career in business, or are simply a consumer, some knowledge of competition is useful. If you're a student of industrial economics, or of marketing, some knowledge of competition law is a wise precaution. Moreover there are considerably more job opportunities in this area, whether as an economic adviser, legal practitioner or in-house lawyer advising on effective compliance.

Discrimination Law

Although we are all equal in the law, some are treated more equally than others. This module examines the nature of discrimination and some of the reasons for it, and the history of the law which tries to prohibit it and promote equality. The class looks in depth at the Equality Act 2010 and relevant case law. It covers the protected characteristics, direct and indirect discrimination, harassment, victimisation and disability discrimination, including the duty to make reasonable adjustments. As well as individual anti-discrimination law in employment and goods and services, the class examines preventive and pro-active measures, including positive action and the public equality duty and the arguments around their nature.

Assessment consists of a group presentation on an approved topic of your choice and a piece of coursework requiring problem solving skills and analysis of law and policy.

Ethics & Justice

The Ethics and Justice class aims to introduce students to the world of work by bridging the gap between theory and practice, and by providing them with the intellectual and practical tools to deal with the personal and practical dimensions of law in a competent, ethical and socially responsible manner.

The class will help to develop students’ legal, intellectual and practical skills, and provide them with an opportunity to reflect on the effectiveness and ethics of what they do and how this fits in with problems of access to justice. It will also enhance student understanding of the social and economic context in which legal rules operate.

This class is only open to Law Clinic students with case experience.

Internet Law

The extensive uptake of new digital information technologies and particularly, the internet, has resulted in expanding our legal universe, with new laws being created, the application of older laws being challenged and reconfigured and, unavoidably, new legal challenges arising due to conflicts of regulatory decisions with technological advances.

The aim of the class is to address the basic issues arising from the advent of the internet and related digital technologies and familiarise students with important legal developments that have taken place in the last 20 years.

Crime & Punishment

This class encourages students to think constructively and critically about contemporary issues in the field of criminology. It also focuses on contemporary responses to crime in the fields of punishment, imprisonment and penal policy, with reference to developments in Scotland and beyond.

Human Rights Law

This class deals with the questions, what are those 'basic' or 'fundamental' rights and freedoms to which every individual is entitled in a democratic society, and how to protect them against possible violations.

The class focuses on a selection of the most prominent human rights which have resulted in considerable amounts of litigation.  You'll consider the right to life, right not to be tortured, freedom of expression, children’s rights and issues regarding terrorism.

Employment Law

This class aims to provide students with an understanding of employment law in a UK and EU-wide context and to introduce students to the sources, principles and main features of employment law.

You'll learn about key employment protection provisions and the major collective provisions of employment law in the UK, including the legal position of the contract of employment, the status of employee, the law and practice of unfair dismissal, discrimination law and working time regulations.

The class will focus on practical employment law involving practitioners, an Employment Judge and an Employment Tribunal visit.

Banking Law & Finance

This course is concerned with the legal relationship of banker and customer and the services offered by bankers in the community. It examines the financial instruments employed in financing trading and other transactions and is especially concerned with the law and practice of lending, both secured and unsecured.

Intellectual Property Law

Intellectual property is integral to all our daily lives, whether it is the music we listen to, the news we read, or chair we sit on, as well as providing the resources necessary to produce new medicines, and the superabundance of brand marketing to which we are routinely subjected.

The class will study the law of patents, trademarks (registered and unregistered), copyright, and moral rights, and the law of confidence (which includes trade secrets). Both the substantive law, and the underlying policy behind providing exclusive rights for this type of property will be examined.

Public International Law

Interested in what is going on in Syria? Concerned about what may or may not be going on in North Korea? Pondering why troops are still in Afghanistan? Then public international law might be the class for you.

The class explores the relationships between states as among themselves and with international institutions. As well as giving an overall view of the area, we'll also look at specific incidents which have arisen and which have been dominated by international law, and which in turn have made huge contributions to the area.

The syllabus looks at sources including treaties and customary law, statehood, the collective use of force, state responsibility and terrorism, the International Criminal Court and the International Court of Justice.

Local Government Law

This class is evening teaching only.

In Scotland, local government employs around 250,000 people. Every council has its own legal department and nearly 10% of practising solicitors in Scotland are employed by local authorities. It is essential that lawyers in private practice have knowledge of how local government works.

The course will cover a selection of the following topics:

  • what local government is and what does it does
  • the constitutional position of local government
  • the structure of Scottish local government and its statutory framework
  • elections to and membership of a local authority
  • rights, duties, liabilities and restrictions of councillors
  • the councillors’ Code of Conduct and registration of interests
  • the powers of local government; the ultra vires rule; community planning; the power of wellbeing; publicity powers
  • byelaws, management rules and private Acts of Parliament
  • how councils work; the political dimension
  • external controls on local government; the courts; the ombudsman, the Standards Commission, the Accounts Commission
  • a brief guide to local government finance

Year 4

Journalism & Creative Writing

Compulsory classes

These are the Honours classes currently offered. Not all of these classes will necessarily run every year and you should check with Course Support which are available for study.

Dissertation Journalism

The dissertation is 6000-8000 words long and provides an opportunity to undertake a short research project on an approved topic of your choice. You'll be allocated an individual supervisor who'll guide your research and read drafts of your dissertation.

Please consult the dissertation handbook on MyPlace for further information on the English, Journalism and Creative Writing dissertation options and requirements for entry to these classes.

The ‘special project’ journalism dissertation should consist of 6000 words of journalism and 2000 words of critical analysis/reflection.

Dissertation in Creative Writing

The dissertation is 6000 words long and provides an opportunity to undertake a short research project on an approved topic of your choice. You'll be allocated an individual supervisor who'll guide your research and read drafts of your dissertation.

Please consult the dissertation handbook on MyPlace for further information on the English, Journalism and Creative Writing dissertation options and requirements for entry to these classes.

The Creative Writing dissertation has two components:

  • creative work of up to 6,000 words
  • a 2,000-word critical reflection
Elective classes
Journalism Portfolio

This class is driven by the realities of journalism in Scotland, the UK and wider world, in the 21st century.

The media landscape is changing fast and this class aims to study, impart and practice skills, theories and approaches which will assist us in understanding journalism and becoming better journalists. Technology and journalism have gone hand in hand since the days of paper and pencil.

This class identifies and utilises the latest developments in our digital toolbox which include:

  • online databases
  • online sources
  • discussion boards
  • social networking sites
  • blogs
You'll study how best to use them in producing excellent journalism. Technology can help journalists create great journalism – but it should never overwhelm, control or unduly influence the story. It's only useful if it helps us be produce powerful and compelling work. So, we'll learn how to use classic newsgathering techniques (e.g. face-to-face interviewing) alongside exciting new approaches.

Much superb journalism still exists in print of course. But increasingly, stories are also being published on a multi-platform basis allowing us to see, hear and read additional material which adds depth and width to the stories themselves.

Creative Writing Portfolio

You'll develop your knowledge and understanding of advanced skills necessary to the creation of fiction and poetry. These will be developed via critical and analytical reflection on aspects of enjoyable published work by leading writers in these fields.

You'll undertake a series of writing tasks on a weekly basis designed to foster your ability to manipulate narrative and poetic structures and an understanding of the importance of editing and redrafting your work. You'll also develop a knowledge of some of the major thematic and formal issues present in current British and American fiction and poetry.

The course will be taught through a mixture of workshop, guided reading and practical tasks and is taught by published creative writers.

Media and Literary Publics

This class looks at the development and significance of the various formations of media and literary publics.

We'll examine the cultivation of the literary public in the 17th century, alongside the development of particular literary forms, and will look at the development of political forms of public and its literary expression.  The class will look at literary production as a vital component in the shaping of the social environment and relations.

We'll also examine the extent to which an understanding of public allows us to critically evaluate such issues as cultural distinction, the marketing and branding of literary and media production, and the expansion of political and literary engagement.

Finally, the class will look at the manner in which alternative ideas of media public have been used to create innovative and radical types of media and literary production and consumption.

New Narratives

The class will mainly focus on your own creative output be that fiction, creative non-fiction or poetry.

It will also look at what is possible using traditional and digital media and encourage you to disseminate their work in a number of ways. This could be creating audio recordings or digital 'trailers' of their work to be accessed through a podcast or on a dedicated YouTube channel. Technology used will all be readily accessible on a smartphone or a computer, such as Paper Camera, Hipstamatic, Voice Recorder, imovie, and social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook.

The class will also look at traditional literary magazines, online literary magazines and the emergence of magazines that use new technology such as Electric Literature. Culminating in a public reading, the emphasis will be on how to move beyond the university workshop and engage with the rapidly evolving publishing landscape.

The Journalism of War

This class will examine the reporting which has emanated from major conflicts over the last century.

The starting point will be dispatches from the First World War. The class will end with recent reporting from Iraq and Afghanistan. The journalistic output will be in the form of published press reports, novels, travelogues, radio scripts, television broadcasts and online coverage.

The class will focus on the techniques used by the authors:

  • historical constraints
  • identify common threads through output through the decades
  • assessing the changing mission of reporters
  • evaluating the technological impact of the broadcast and recent digital eras
  • the various focus chosen by journalists in the last century – moving from the ‘general’ reporting to the ‘personal story’

The style of output will be scrutinised, along with the changing needs of the audiences. The theoretical backdrop will focus on:

  • the shifting demand for conflict reporting as democratic societies developed in the last century
  • the changing nature of the backgrounds of the journalists themselves
  • the widening access to new technology
  • the move towards increasing risk in reporting from conflict zones globally
Ethical Issues in Journalism

In reporting the news today journalists face an increasingly diverse range of ethical dilemmas. This can have a significant impact on the manner in which they report the news.

Ethical issues do not only occur in traditional, mainstream reporting. New challenges are being thrown up by the use of the internet as a newsgathering tool, a publishing forum and as a means of interacting with the audience.

This class examines ethical issues relating to truth and trust, taste and offence, privacy and intrusion and respecting people. It considers the procedures that journalists use to solve ethical dilemmas and systems that are used to curb media excesses, both in traditional media forms and online.

Assessment

Journalism & Creative Writing

Our assessment methods include:

  • essays
  • portfolios
  • presentations
  • group work
  • reports
  • exams
  • reflective diaries

Law

Our assessment methods include:

  • exams
  • multiple choice exams
  • problem-based and critical analysis essays
  • presentations
  • group work
  • reports
  • case studies
  • reflective diaries

Learning & teaching

Journalism & Creative Writing

As a student, our learning and teaching aims to help you:

  • develop knowledge and understanding of the professional practices, skills and social contexts of the journalism, creative writing and communication industries
  • help you think and work critically and constructively
  • become a confident and responsible graduate, equipped to develop your potential throughout your career
Guest lecturers

A programme of visiting speakers from the world of broadcasting, publishing and newspapers, including Gaynor McFarlane (BBC) and Alan Ramsay (Connect Communications) runs alongside the Literary Lunch, run by our Keith Wright Literary Fellow. This series showcases the best in Scottish writing, and features poets and novelists such as Liz Lochhead, James Robertson and Andrew Greig.

Law

Our teaching aims to help students develop knowledge and understanding of the principles, nature and development of law and legal institutions in Scotland and in other jurisdictions. The programme is delivered by leading academics through a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops and webcasts.

Entry requirements

Minimum grades

Required subjects are indicated following minimum accepted grades.

Highers

1st sitting: AAAA

2nd sitting: AAAAB

Required subjects

  • Higher English plus at least one subject from the list below
  • National 5 Maths or National 5 Lifeskills Maths or Intermediate 2 at Grade C or above

Higher Subjects

  • Classical Studies
  • Drama
  • Economics
  • French
  • Gaelic
  • Geography
  • German
  • History
  • Italian
  • Modern Studies
  • Philosophy
  • Politics
  • Psychology
  • Religious Moral and Philosophical Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish

We recognise a wide range of Highers, however social science subjects should make up thae majority of your profile.

A Levels

Minimum entry requirement: BBB (GCSE English Language B or English Literature B, GCSE Maths C)

Typical entry requirement: ABB (GCSE English Language B or English Literature B, GCSE Maths C)

International Baccalaureate

36 (Maths SL5)

HNC/HND

HNC Creative Industries: Media & Communication A in Graded Unit; Professional Writing A in Graded Unit

HNC Practical Journalism: A in Graded Unit

Irish Leaving Certificate

Subjects and grades as for Highers

Additional Information

Personal Statement

It is important to take care over your personal statement. We look for information about your academic and career interests, and your range of skills, abilities, and relevant experience. Your personal statement should show evidence you have a strong awareness and interest in the subject you are applying to.

Deferred Entry

Deferred entry not normally accepted.

Applicants with Highers

Due to the high level of competition for the number of available places it is unlikely that Conditional Offers will be made to anyone attaining less than BBB at the first sitting of Highers.

Second-year Entry

Second-year entry for A Level/Advanced Higher candidates is possible with AA/AB in the two subjects you are planning to study.

Admission to Honours

All students will be admitted as potential Honours students. Students may exit with a Bachelor of Arts degree at the end of Year 3 of the programme if they have accumulated at least 360 credits and satisfied the appropriate specialisation requirements. For admission to the final year of the Honours course, a student must have achieved an approved standard of performance.

Widening access

We want to increase opportunities for people from every background. Strathclyde selects our students based on merit, potential and the ability to benefit from the education we offer. We look for more than just your grades. We consider the circumstances of your education and will make lower offers to certain applicants as a result.

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

International students

Find out entry requirements for your country.

Degree preparation course for international students

We offer international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for an undergraduate degree at Strathclyde the option of completing an Undergraduate Foundation year programme at the International Study Centre. To find out more about these courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future.

You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Fees & funding

How much will my course cost?

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

2017/18

Scotland/EU
  • £1,820
Rest of UK
  • £9,250

Bachelor degrees at Strathclyde will cost £9,250 a year, but the total amount payable will be capped at £27,750 for students on a four-year Bachelors programme. Students studying on integrated Masters degree programmes – for example MSci, MEng and MPharm – will pay £9,250 for the Masters year.

International
  • £13,500

Additional fees 

Course materials & costs 

Recommended text for first year Law module 'Law & Society' M9113 costs £30. 

Please note: All fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my studies?

Students from Scotland and the EU

If you're a Scottish or EU student, you may be able to apply to the Student Award Agency Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government. Scottish students may also be eligible for a bursary and loan to help cover living costs while at University.

For more information on funding your studies have a look at our University Funding page.

Students from England, Wales & Northern Ireland

We have a generous package of bursaries on offer for students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales

Careers

Journalism & Creative Writing graduates from Strathclyde have won awards for student journalism and have gone on to succeed at national newspapers, the regional press and as published authors.

Among graduates’ job titles are:

  • Press Officer
  • Marketing & Media Officer
  • Freelance Journalist
  • Fundraiser
  • PR Assistant

Graduates who have studied law and another discipline may find openings in government services, commerce and industry, banking and insurance, management and administration, where knowledge of the legal implications of business practice is of value.

Some graduates continue to an accelerated graduate LLB degree, usually with the aim of entering the legal profession.

Contact us

Apply

How to apply – 10 things you need to know

  1. All undergraduate applications are made through UCAS
    Go to the UCAS website to apply – you can apply for up to five courses.
  2. It costs £12 to apply for a course
    The cost is £23 for two to five courses.
  3. The deadline is 15 January each year
    This is the application deadline for most courses. However, please check the details for your particular course. View a full list of UCAS key dates.
  4. You might be asked to attend an interview
    Most of our courses make offers based on the UCAS application. However some might ask you to attend an interview or for a portfolio of work. If this is the case, this will be stated in the prospectus entry requirements.
  5. It’s possible to apply directly to Year 2
    Depending on your qualifications, you might be able to apply directly to Year 2 - or even Year 3 - of a course. Speak to the named contact for your course if you want to discuss this.
  6. There’s three types of decision
    • unconditional – you’ve already met our entry requirements
    • conditional – we’ll offer you a place if you meet certain conditions, usually based on your exams
    • unsuccessful – we’ve decided not to offer you a place
  7. You need to contact UCAS to accept your offer
    Once you’ve decided which course you’d like to accept, you must let UCAS know. You don’t need to decide until you’ve received all offers. UCAS will give you a deadline you must respond by.

    You’ll choose one as your firm choice. If the offer is unconditional or if you meet the conditions, this is the course you’ll study.

    You’ll also have an insurance choice. This is a back-up option if you don’t meet the conditions of your first choice.
  8. You don’t need to send us your exam results (Scotland, England & Wales)
    If you’re studying in Scotland, England or Wales, we receive a copy of your Higher/Advanced Higher/A Level results directly from the awarding body. However, if you are studying a different qualification, then please contact us to arrange to send your results directly.
  9. We welcome applications from international students

    Find out further information about our entry and English language requirements.

    International students who don’t meet the entry requirements, can apply for our pre-undergraduate programmes.

    There’s also an online application form.

    For further information:
  10. Here’s a really useful video to help you apply

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