Education in the dictionary

BAEnglish & Education

Why this course?

As an English student at Strathclyde, you'll enjoy the best of old and new: a grounding in the classics as well as an insight into new fields of literature.

We're the only university in Scotland to offer a joint honours degree in Education 

We'll show you how exciting and wide-ranging our subject can be. Employers like the skills developed in an English degree: written and verbal communication, analysis and discussion of ideas, and broad, creative thinking.

Education is essential if you wish to study initial teacher education courses. We offer you the chance to develop knowledge of the education systems of Scotland and beyond, looking at issues including policy, social justice, equity and inclusion.

Combining education with other subjects provides opportunities for those who wish to work in professions associated with education but who do not wish to become teachers. Please note this course doesn't qualify you as a teacher.

English

What you'll study

Year 1

Your first year of study will include Shakespearean drama and modern, cutting-edge fiction.

Year 2

Year 2 students study some of the most momentous events in literary history, with classes on Renaissance, Enlightenment and Romantic writing.

Year 3

In Year 3, you'll choose from options including children’s literature, America in the 1920s, the First World War and the Glasgow novel.

Year 4

In your final year, you’ll write a dissertation and choose from options including Victorian Gothic writing, literary snobbery, travel writing, oral narratives and fairy tales.

Major projects

In Honours year, you'll write and research a 6,000-word dissertation with guidance from a personal supervisor. This is an opportunity to investigate a topic of your own choice. Previous dissertations have focussed on music and film as well as literary topics.

Facilities

Our location in the Lord Hope building provides a social hub and access to student services such as the library, cafés, meeting areas and exhibition spaces. The Andersonian Library has around a million print volumes as well as access to over 540,000 electronic books and over 38,000 e-journals.

Postgraduate study

We offer taught masters degrees in:

Masters degrees can be a first step to a PhD or help with career and personal development. We welcome overseas students, including visiting students.

We also offer various research degrees, including an innovative MRes in Creative Writing.

Socrates exchange

You'll have the opportunity to take part in the Socrates exchange programme, in which you can spend your third year (two semesters) abroad and obtain credits that qualify you to enter the Honours year in one or both of your principal subjects on your return.

Socrates have partner institutions in Germany and France, as well as programmes in North America and elsewhere. While priority on Socrates is given to students who have proficiency in the relevant language, many classes (at least in the host English departments) are conducted in English and there is no language requirement for countries like the USA.

Education

What you'll study

Year 1

Education issues explored include: the impact of poverty and social class on children and society, the role of culture and community in education, how people learn and the place of policy and politics in education. You'll undertake a placement with children between the ages of 0-14.

Year 2

In second year, you'll look more closely at how people learn. You'll study how children learn from before they are born to learning in later life. You'll also learn about informal education and have the opportunity to study an education-focused module of your choice.

Year 3

This year explores the history and philosophy of education as well as looking at adult education. You'll also review how children and childhood are represented in film and literature.

Year 4

As a fourth year student, you'll have an element of choice in your study modules. You can look at policy and politics in education and/or broader social issues in education.

Work placement

As part of the first year in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences all students choosing to study education must undertake a placement. This placement involves working with children between the ages of 0-14 for 70 hours across the course of the year and can be in a range of options other than a mainstream primary school setting.

Please read our important information about the Protecting Vulnerable Groups (PVG) Scheme. This is for all applicants applying for courses which involve placement opportunities (working with children or vulnerable adults).

Major projects

Students enjoy a wide range of professional development opportunities. These might be ones run by students or by organisations that are invited in to speak with students.

Currently, we have leading professional development opportunities like learning British Sign Language, anti-sectarian education, and working with children abroad.

You'll have the opportunity to lead some professional development for staff and students if you have a particular strength or expertise relevant to education. There are also extra-curricular education activities such as a philosophy café and film group.

Dissertation

Within the joint Honours in Education you’ll be able to undertake a dissertation that allows you to do research in an area of particular interest to you.

Facilities

You'll have access to the Education Resources Centre. The Education Resources Centre is a library dedicated to education materials and is the best resource of its kind in the country.

Postgraduate study

By completing the BA joint Honours in Education, you'll be in a great position to apply for our Primary Education (PGDE) or Secondary Education (PGDE) courses. You might also be able to continue on to study for your Masters in Education with us here at Strathclyde

Course content

Year 1

English

Year 1

In this wide-ranging introduction to university-level English, your required reading ranges from ancient tales, to Shakespearean drama, to cutting-edge contemporary fiction.

Education

Understanding Education in the 21st Century

This class introduces students to a large and rich seam of disciplinary knowledge. It is an introductory class of potential interest to all who want to understand more about Education. Some of the key content to be addressed in the module is around the following:

  • the field of study that is education: what it is and how we know that
  • the context of education: some contribution of political, historical and economic dimensions to curriculum, schooling, policy, globalisation
  • education achievement: some contributions of psychological, sociological and philosophical perspectives to topics such as learning, diversity, gender
Placement & Curriculum

On this module, students from across disciplines work together to learn about children and the communities in which they live; children's health and wellbeing; child protection; children's voice; children's play and play places. The notion that the health and wellbeing of children and young people is central to the advancement of society is a seminal theme in this module. 

The placement experience has been designed to allow students to undertake a work placement with children and young people from 0 - 14 years.  Placements will be provided in a range of settings outwith the mainstream classroom.

Year 2

English

Year 2

You'll study momentous events in literary history in the historical core classes on Renaissance, Enlightenment and Romantic writing. You'll also learn about the various ways in which philosophers, historians and authors have tried to analyse literature in a course on Literature, Criticism and Theory.

Education

Learners & Learning
This class provides students with an essential understanding of human learning processes and the needs of learners across the life-course.
Informal Education
This module investigates philosophical and pedagogical interventions beyond the school curriculum in informal settings, with adults in particular. It'll also open up possibilities for informal education techniques and practices to be considered and adopted by a range of professions and to explore potential partnerships between informal education specialists and others.

Year 3

English

Year 3

You'll continue with historical core classes on Victorian and 20th-century Literature, and you'll also choose one further class (English with another subject) or three classes (single English). Our extensive menu of options means you could study anything from Shakespeare to experimental fiction, from children’s literature to America in the 1920s, from autobiography to the Glasgow novel, from First World War literature to detective fiction.

Education

History & Philosophy of Education

This module will support students in developing their knowledge and understanding of the roots of some key educational ideas in history. These will be considered from a philosophical perspective.

Children & Childhood

This module will focus on children and childhood in contexts other than formal education settings that will be explored elsewhere. The aim of this module is to introduce students to the concepts of child and childhood through a range representations. The class will draw on children in film, art and literature to explore representations of children and childhood and experiences of childhood.

Social Pedagogy with Adults

This module is based on an understanding of the evolution of adult learning and the resultant principles that underline current practice and will illustrate how adult educators work and will also open up possibilities for adult education techniques and practices to be considered. It'll also explore potential partnerships between adult educators and others.

Year 4

English

Year 4

Throughout the degree, analytical and writing skills are being developed, preparing you to tackle the final-year dissertation. The choice of subjects for your dissertation is wide open – we value student initiative and reward it when we see it.

Fourth year is also your chance to take some more options – two for Joint Honours and three for Single Honours. The options on offer in Honours year include classes on Victorian Gothic writing, literary snobbery, 1930s literature and culture, travel writing, atrocity and modernism, oral narratives and fairytales.

Education

Compulsory classes
Dissertation

The Dissertation in Education is designed to further students’ development of a questioning, self-evaluative and reflective approach in a major in-depth piece of work demanding independent, self-motivated study and the sustained application of professional research and enquiry skills.

The widest possible range of topics, types of project, modes of enquiry and of research techniques is encouraged. What projects have in common is the individual student’s ownership and control of the project and the expectation of high quality work.

Elective classes

Choose from this list

Policy & Politics in Education

This class will provide students with the opportunity to engage in debate about current issues in education through detailed exploration of the policy and political contexts. It will introduce students to frameworks for understanding how policy comes about and how it is inextricably linked with political issues.

Social Issues in Education

This class will teach students about the responsibility of teachers for the education, health and well-being of all children, in the context of a complex and diverse society.  It will also address the needs of those who will work with children, young people and adults in a variety of education-related contexts through its focus on a range of key social issues and the relevant national legislative and policy framework.

Social Research Methods

This class prepares you for designing and completing a research project. It will equip you with the skills and knowledge required in planning and delivering a research project.

Assessment

English

In addition to traditional exams, many classes are assessed partly or solely by essays. In later years, you've the opportunity to set the topics and titles of these essays themselves.

Some courses have specific assessment methods, for example drama students are assessed for their writing and practical performance skills, while those studying digital humanities use social media and analyse texts with software.

All our classes use Myplace, Strathclyde's virtual learning environment, which can be used for online quizzes and keeping a reading diary.

Education

In Year 1, you're supported in learning about academic reading, writing and referencing - skills that will help you become a successful undergraduate. Through peer support we encourage you to develop your own assessment skills and learn from each other. During the course, tutorials and presentations are assessed and feedback provided, before you submit work for formal assessment.

Learning & teaching

English

English staff present lectures, seminars and workshops, where you take part in small group work, individual and group presentations, debates and writing exercises. Some classes also take place in computer labs and include analysis of texts using software tools.

Vertically Integrated Project

We've recently introduced a new research task in which staff, undergraduates and postgraduates work together.

Education

You'll take part in workshops for practical aspects of the course, and have access to lab space and specialist teaching space for science and the expressive arts, including physical education. Field trips and the chance to study elective and optional classes are also available to you.

Throughout the degree programme, you'll be invited to lectures by guest speakers that are visiting the School of Education. They'll also be invited to lectures specifically for Education students. As part of the work on professional development, you'll have the opportunity to organise guest speakers from relevant organisations to speak with students. The School of Education aims to be responsive to the interests of its students as well as ensuring that they have access to leading educationists when they visit.

Entry requirements

Minimum grades

Required subjects are indicated following minimum accepted grades.

Highers

1st sitting: AAAA

2nd sitting: AAAAB

Required subjects
  • Higher English, plus one from the list below
  • Maths National or Lifeskills Maths National 5 C (please note this grade has been revised since the printed prospectus was published) Intermediate 2 C
Higher subjects
  • Classical Studies
  • Drama
  • Economics
  • French
  • Gaelic
  • Geography
  • German
  • History
  • Italian
  • Modern Studies
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Politics
  • Psychology
  • Religious Moral & Philosophical Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish

We recognise a wide range of Highers, however, social science subjects should make up the majority of your profile.

A Levels

Year 1 entry:

Minimum entry requirement: BBB (GCSE English Language B or English Literature B, GCSE Maths C)

Typical entry requirement: ABB (GCSE English Language B or English Literature B, GCSE Maths C)

Year 2 entry:

Minimum entry requirement: ABB (two core subjects at AB)

Typical entry requirement: AAA (two core subjects required)

International Baccalaureate

36 (Maths SL5)

HNC/HND

HNC Social Sciences: A in Graded Unit; Maths National 5/ Standard Grade/ Intermediate 2

Irish Leaving Certificate

Subjects and grades as for Highers.

Additional information

Personal statement

It is important to take care over your personal statement. We look for information about your academic and career interests, and your range of skills, abilities, and relevant experience. Your personal statement should show evidence you have a strong awareness and interest in the subject you are applying to.

Deferred entry

Deferred entry normally not accepted.

Applicants with Highers

Due to the high level of competition for the number of available places, it is unlikely that Conditional Offers will be made to anyone attaining less than BBB at the first sitting of Highers.

Second-year entry

Second-year entry for A Level/Advanced Higher candidates is possible with AA/AB in the two subjects you are planning to study.

Admission to Honours

All students will be admitted as potential Honours students. Students may exit with a Bachelor of Arts degree at the end of Year 3 of the programme if they have accumulated at least 360 credits and satisfied the appropriate specialisation requirements. For admission to the final year of the Honours course, a student must have achieved an approved standard of performance.

Widening access

We want to increase opportunities for people from every background. Strathclyde selects our students based on merit, potential and the ability to benefit from the education we offer. We look for more than just your grades. We consider the circumstances of your education and will make lower offers to certain applicants as a result.

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

International students

Find out entry requirements for your country.

Degree preparation course for international students

We offer international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for an undergraduate degree at Strathclyde the option of completing an Undergraduate Foundation year programme at the International Study Centre. To find out more about these courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future.

You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Fees & funding

How much will my course cost?

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

2017/18

Scotland/EU
  • £1,820
Rest of UK
  • £9,250

Bachelor degrees at Strathclyde will cost £9,250 a year, but the total amount payable will be capped at £27,750 for students on a four-year Bachelors programme. Students studying on integrated Masters degree programmes – for example MSci, MEng and MPharm – will pay £9,250 for the Masters year.

International
  • £13,500

Please note: All fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my studies?

Students from Scotland and the EU

If you're a Scottish or EU student, you may be able to apply to the Student Award Agency Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government. Scottish students may also be eligible for a bursary and loan to help cover living costs while at University.

For more information on funding your studies have a look at our University Funding page.

Students from England, Wales & Northern Ireland

We have a generous package of bursaries on offer for students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales

Careers

English graduates from Strathclyde include TV journalists, councillors, the Scottish novelist Andrew O’Hagan and former head of the Scottish Arts Council James Boyle.

An English degree helps graduates find work in areas such as publishing, the civil service, administration and creative writing.

Many Education graduates find jobs in associated areas, such as law, psychology, the civil service and journalism. A joint Honours degree in Education and another subject enables graduates to apply for the Professional Graduate Diploma in Education, in either primary or secondary education.

Contact us

Apply

How to apply – 10 things you need to know

  1. All undergraduate applications are made through UCAS
    Go to the UCAS website to apply – you can apply for up to five courses.
  2. It costs £12 to apply for a course
    The cost is £23 for two to five courses.
  3. The deadline is 15 January each year
    This is the application deadline for most courses. However, please check the details for your particular course. View a full list of UCAS key dates.
  4. You might be asked to attend an interview
    Most of our courses make offers based on the UCAS application. However some might ask you to attend an interview or for a portfolio of work. If this is the case, this will be stated in the prospectus entry requirements.
  5. It’s possible to apply directly to Year 2
    Depending on your qualifications, you might be able to apply directly to Year 2 - or even Year 3 - of a course. Speak to the named contact for your course if you want to discuss this.
  6. There’s three types of decision
    • unconditional – you’ve already met our entry requirements
    • conditional – we’ll offer you a place if you meet certain conditions, usually based on your exams
    • unsuccessful – we’ve decided not to offer you a place
  7. You need to contact UCAS to accept your offer
    Once you’ve decided which course you’d like to accept, you must let UCAS know. You don’t need to decide until you’ve received all offers. UCAS will give you a deadline you must respond by.

    You’ll choose one as your firm choice. If the offer is unconditional or if you meet the conditions, this is the course you’ll study.

    You’ll also have an insurance choice. This is a back-up option if you don’t meet the conditions of your first choice.
  8. You don’t need to send us your exam results (Scotland, England & Wales)
    If you’re studying in Scotland, England or Wales, we receive a copy of your Higher/Advanced Higher/A Level results directly from the awarding body. However, if you are studying a different qualification, then please contact us to arrange to send your results directly.
  9. We welcome applications from international students

    Find out further information about our entry and English language requirements.

    International students who don’t meet the entry requirements, can apply for our pre-undergraduate programmes.

    There’s also an online application form.

    For further information:
  10. Here’s a really useful video to help you apply

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