Law students

LLBLaw (Graduate Entry)

Why this course?

The Law School at Strathclyde is one of Scotland’s leading providers of legal education.

Studying Law concerns the obligations, duties and rights of every member of society in relation to their neighbours and to society.

This course offers you the opportunity to undertake a law degree recognised in Scotland.

You'll gain in-depth knowledge of Scots law in a department that puts special emphasis on experiential learning.

We're home to Scotland’s biggest student-run law clinic, which offers a unique, real-world, learning environment, and to Ardcalloch, a virtual community where the legal issues of everyday life are played out.

What you’ll study

This is an accelerated programme for graduates from other disciplines. You'll study a three-year LLB condensed into two years covering all the required professional subjects required by the Law Society of Scotland to practice as a solicitor in Scotland. You'll be given the opportunity to take additional subjects required for practising as an advocate if you so wish.

Depending on performance, there may be an opportunity for you to proceed to an Honours year.

Year 1

(Scots) Criminal Law, Law & Society, Legal Methods, Legal Process, Public Law 1, (Scots) Voluntary Obligations: Contract & Promise, (Scots) Domestic Relations.

Year 2

Public Law 2, Commercial Law, (Scots) Property, Trusts and Succession, European Union Law, (Scots) Involuntary Obligations: Delict and Unjustified Enrichment plus one elective class.

Year 3 (Optional)

As an Honours student you'll take four elective classes as well as writing an 11,000-word dissertation. Formal lectures are replaced by seminars in the final-year. 

Facilities

Law Clinic

Strathclyde’s Law Clinic is run by students for members of the public who cannot afford a lawyer and are not eligible for legal aid.

More than 200 of our students are now involved and regularly represent clients in Small Claims and Sheriff Courts.

Students admitted to membership of the Strathclyde Law Clinic are able to follow the LLB (Clinical) programme.

Students receive basic training in legal skills, such as interviewing, negotiation and advocacy and (in the Clinical Legal Practice course) reflecting on experiences and on the ethics and justice of legal practice. Assessment in relevant courses such as Employment Law and Housing Law will be partly on the basis of students’ handling of cases.

Find out more about our Law Clinic.

Course content

Year 1

Criminal Law

This course considers everything from the theory of why and how someone is held responsible for criminal actions, to many specific crimes, including murder, the less serious crimes of personal violence, crimes of dishonesty, breach of the peace and attempting to pervert the course of justice.

Law & Society

This class engages with some challenging problems faced by law within contemporary society. It introduces students to some aspects of the social, political, and ethical conditions in which law operates. It deals with the interaction of law with justice, politics, morals and equality. The course will examine the role and challenges of law in times of social change. The course is structured around three key themes:

  • legal reasoning
  • law & politics
  • law & social change

 

Legal Methods

The aims of this class are to:

  • provide students with a basic knowledge of the history, structure and institutions of the Scottish legal system
  • provide students with the skills required to find, interpret and analyse the law applicable in Scotland, from all their various sources
  • introduce students to competing conceptions of law
  • introduce students to legal reasoning
Legal Process
The aims of this class are to:
  • enable students to comprehend the structure, function, operation and proposals for reform of the courts and tribunals in Scotland
  • introduce students to the institutions and people involved in legal processes in Scotland
  • expose students to an established body of socio-legal scholarship on legal process and to encourage students to use this knowledge to critically assess liberal rule of law ideology
  • consider the professional personnel who inhabit the legal world and to examine within broader social and comparative context their respective roles and functions, their recruitment, training, complaints procedures and disciplinary sanctions
  • explore on a comparative basis social, political and economic issues in relation to the provision of legal services in Scotland
Public Law 1

Following on from the introduction to the constitution – its key actors, institutions and their functions – in Public Law 1, students taking Public Law 2 will build upon that knowledge here: first by focusing on the ways in which legal (judicial review) and quasi-legal (tribunals, public inquiries, ombudsmen) bodies supervise the exercise of constitutional and administrative decision making; secondly, by a detailed analysis of the political and legal mechanisms which exist for the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms. As such, Public Law 2 is concerned with the abuse of power, and the ways and means by which power can be limited and held to account – whether that is the power of a golf club to suspend an unruly member, the power of a local authority to order the compulsory purchase of privately owned property, or the power of the Prime Minister to wage war.

Voluntary Obligations: Contract & Promises

While the most obvious aim of this course is to familiarise students with Scottish contract law and voluntary obligations, this aim may be divided into a number of sub-aims. They are as follows:

  • to place voluntary obligations within the general framework of Scots Law
  • to place the Scots law of voluntary obligations within its European context
  • to analyse and explain how contracts and promises are formed
  • to analyse and explain how voluntary obligations may be vitiated and on what grounds their validity may be challenged
  • to analyse and explain the substance of contracts and how the inclusion and exclusion of rights and liabilities is circumscribed by law
  • to analyse and explain how contracts break down or otherwise come to an end and the remedies available when they do
Domestic Relations

Family law concerns the control which the law exerts over domestic relationships and families; it affects everyone to a greater or lesser degree.

Topics include:

  • the legal status of children, parental responsibilities and rights and the upbringing of children - including issues in adoption and fostering, local authority care and the Children's Hearing system
  • legal consequences of marriage/civil partnership
  • divorce - including what happens to the family and its financial consequences
  • unmarried domestic relations, opposite-sex and same-sex

Year 2

Public Law 2

Following on from Public Law 1, Public Law 2 aims to consolidate knowledge and understanding of constitutional and administrative law. Students taking this class will require to have taken Public Law 1 in the first year. It'll build upon knowledge of the key concepts and institutions of the UK constitution. As a second year class, its rationale is to give students the opportunity to progress from an understanding of the constitution to an understanding of the role of the law in the constitutional control of public power. This course encourages students to adopt an evaluative and critical stance towards ongoing constitutional developments. The course will focus on control of administrative action, both by the judiciary and by ombudsmen. The protection of individual rights will be a key feature, focusing on judicial protection but also encompassing the role of human rights institutions in the UK and Scotland. The future control of public power will be discussed, including topical debates concerning constitutional reform in this area.

Commercial Law

Commercial law is a second year compulsory subject on the LLB (and LML) degree. The class provides students with an understanding of commercial law in a Scottish context. It partially meets the commercial law subject requirements and related skills outcomes of the Law Society of Scotland and the Faculty of Advocates (albeit that some of the commercial professional topics, eg sale of goods and insurance law, are dealt with by other courses).

Building on the knowledge acquired by students in first year, the general academic objective of the course is to examine the basic principles and rules concerning core aspects of commercial law, including the main principles of agency, partnership and company law, the law relating to various methods of payment (including consumer credit and bills of exchange) the rules governing the ways in which creditors can ‘secure’ repayment of a debt (eg through taking personal guarantees from third parties for repayment of the debt, or by establishing rights in security over debtor property); the basic principles of diligence; the consequences of both corporate and individual debtor inability to repay debts (corporate insolvency and personal bankruptcy respectively).

While the focus of the class is on ‘a black letter’ analysis of relevant statutory and common law in the broad commercial area, in order to aid understanding of relevant principles, the class also examines the policy rationales underlying the current law and recent and projected reforms in this area.

Property Trusts & Succession

The general rationale of this class is to provide students with a contemporary understanding of the law of property, trusts and succession in Scotland, and to meet Law Society of Scotland requirements in this subject-area.

EU Law

The EU law class focuses on the constitutional and institutional order of the EU as well as on the internal market. To this end, the class looks at the European integration process, the EU institutions, EU competences, the decision-making process within the EU, the principles underpinning the EU legal order and the principles governing the internal market.

Involuntary Obligations: Delict & Unjustified Enrichment

The design of this class is primarily aimed at enhancing students’ ability to read cases, deal with case law and apply the techniques of case-analysis and common law development.

The student will acquire an in-depth and up to date knowledge and understanding, from both a legal and a social perspective, of the rules of law governing involuntary obligations, that is to say the law of delict and the law of unjustified enrichment.

Students will acquire the ability to apply the rules of law to particular fact situations in order to provide definitive answers to the problems exposed in these situations.

Students will develop critical and reasoning skills, giving them the ability to make and present personal and informed judgments on the rules of law and their application within the domestic legal system.

Elective class
You will choose one elective class

Year 3

Optional
As an Honours student, you will complete four elective classes as well as writing an 11,000 word dissertation.

Assessment

We use many different methods of assessment, in addition to exams and course work.

Students from all years can participate in various mooting competitions and Strathclyde has impressive success rates in these.

Many students have also competed successfully in national and international mediation competitions.

Learning & teaching

As well as lectures, tutorials and seminars, our teaching methods include experiences such as the Law Clinic and legal practice. 

Entry requirements

Minimum grades

A second-class Honours degree (2:2) in any discipline.  

A meritorious Ordinary degree may be acceptable if you passed all your undergraduate classes at first attempt.

International students

Find out entry requirements for your country.

Degree preparation course for international students

We offer international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for an undergraduate degree at Strathclyde the option of completing an Undergraduate Foundation year programme at the International Study Centre. To find out more about these courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future.

You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Fees & funding

How much will my course cost?

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Scotland/EU

  • 2017/18 - £7,500

Rest of UK

  • 2017/18 - £7,500

International

  • 2017/18 - £13,500

Students are advised to research funding their course well in advance of commencing their studies.

Additional fees 

Course materials & costs 

Recommended text for first year Law module 'Law & Society' M9113 costs £30. 

Please note: All fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my studies?

Students from Scotland and the EU

If you're a Scottish or EU student, you may be able to apply to the Student Award Agency Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government. Scottish students may also be eligible for a bursary and loan to help cover living costs while at University.

For more information on funding your studies have a look at our University Funding page.

Students from England, Wales & Northern Ireland

We have a generous package of bursaries on offer for students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales

Careers

Most Strathclyde LLB graduates enter the legal profession after completing the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice and a two-year traineeship in a law firm.

Trained Scottish lawyers are increasingly in demand in England and abroad.

There are also many job opportunities for legally-trained graduates in areas such as finance, management consultancy, teaching, central and local government, human resource management, social work and education.

Law graduates can enter many of these immediately after obtaining an LLB. For others it may be necessary to consider a one-year postgraduate course.

Where are they now?

Recent job titles include:*

  • Environmental Consultant
  • Trainee Solicitor

Recent employers include:

  • Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service
  • DEBRA

*Based on the results of the national Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education.

Contact us

Apply

How to apply – 10 things you need to know

  1. All undergraduate applications are made through UCAS
    Go to the UCAS website to apply – you can apply for up to five courses.
  2. It costs £12 to apply for a course
    The cost is £23 for two to five courses.
  3. The deadline is 15 January each year
    This is the application deadline for most courses. However, please check the details for your particular course. View a full list of UCAS key dates.
  4. You might be asked to attend an interview
    Most of our courses make offers based on the UCAS application. However some might ask you to attend an interview or for a portfolio of work. If this is the case, this will be stated in the prospectus entry requirements.
  5. It’s possible to apply directly to Year 2
    Depending on your qualifications, you might be able to apply directly to Year 2 - or even Year 3 - of a course. Speak to the named contact for your course if you want to discuss this.
  6. There’s three types of decision
    • unconditional – you’ve already met our entry requirements
    • conditional – we’ll offer you a place if you meet certain conditions, usually based on your exams
    • unsuccessful – we’ve decided not to offer you a place
  7. You need to contact UCAS to accept your offer
    Once you’ve decided which course you’d like to accept, you must let UCAS know. You don’t need to decide until you’ve received all offers. UCAS will give you a deadline you must respond by.

    You’ll choose one as your firm choice. If the offer is unconditional or if you meet the conditions, this is the course you’ll study.

    You’ll also have an insurance choice. This is a back-up option if you don’t meet the conditions of your first choice.
  8. You don’t need to send us your exam results (Scotland, England & Wales)
    If you’re studying in Scotland, England or Wales, we receive a copy of your Higher/Advanced Higher/A Level results directly from the awarding body. However, if you are studying a different qualification, then please contact us to arrange to send your results directly.
  9. We welcome applications from international students

    Find out further information about our entry and English language requirements.

    International students who don’t meet the entry requirements, can apply for our pre-undergraduate programmes.

    There’s also an online application form.

    For further information:
  10. Here’s a really useful video to help you apply

Discover more about Strathclyde

Law School

Find out all about the Law School here at Strathclyde.

Life in Glasgow

We're one of Europe's most vibrant cities. Voted the ‘friendliest city in the world’ in a recent Rough Guide poll, we're also named a must-visit destination in the New York Times, The Guardian and Wanderlust.

Glasgow at Night - Clyde, Crane, Armadillo, Hydro

Undergraduate Prospectus 2018 now available

Glasgow cityscape - cover of 2018 prospectus

Download or order our new undergraduate 2018 prospectus.