Professor Duncan Graham

Head Of Department

Pure and Applied Chemistry

Personal statement

Position:

Head of Department, Pure and Applied Chemistry, Research Chair of Chemistry, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Director of the Centre for Molecular Nanometrology and Head of Bionanotechnology. 

Biography

Professor Duncan Graham is based at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow and is currently Head of Department for Pure and Applied Chemistry. He has a research group of around 35, and over 200 publications to date. Duncan Graham is also a co-founder of the  Centre for Molecular Nanometrology and is a co-founder and director of Renishaw Diagnostics Ltd (formerly D3 Technologies).   He serves as Chair of the Editorial Board for  Analyst, is president of the Analytical Division of the Royal Society of Chemistry, is on the advisory editorial board for  Chemical Scienceand Chemical Society Reviews, the editorial advisory board for the  Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, the editorial board for  Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging, the advisory board for  Analytical Methods, the advisory board for the new Cell Press journal, Chem and has served on various peer review panels. 

Posts held (all at the University of Strathclyde):

August 2016     Head of Department, Pure and Applied Chemistry

August 2013     Deputy Head of Department, Pure and Applied Chemistry

August 2012     Deputy Director WestCHEM

August 2010     Director, WestCHEM
August 2008     Deputy Director, WestCHEM
August 2008     Head of Research Pure and Applied Chemistry
June 2005         Co-Director, Centre for Molecular Nanometrology
March 2004       Professor, Pure and Applied Chemistry
April 2003         Senior Lecturer, Pure and Applied Chemistry
October 2002    RSC’s Analytical Grand Prix Five Year Fellowship
June 2002         Lecturer, Pure and Applied Chemistry
June 1997         BBSRC David Phillips Five-Year Fellow
Jan 1996           Postdoctoral Researcher

Awards and Fellowships:

2017                  Charles Mann Award, FACSS.  

2016                  Theophilus Redwood Award, Royal Society of Chemistry

2012                  Fellows award from the Society for Applied Spectroscopy
2012                  Craver award of the Coblentz Society
2011                  Fellowship of the Society of Biology
2010                  Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award
2009                  Corday Morgan Prize of the Royal Society of Chemistry
2007                  Fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh
2005                  Nexxus Young Life Scientist of the Year
2004                  RSC’s SAC Silver Medal
2002                  RSC’s Analytical Grand Prix five year fellowship
1997                  BBSRC David Phillips five-year fellowship

Publications

Ratiometric analysis using Raman spectroscopy as a powerful predictor of structural properties of fatty acids
Jamieson Lauren E, Li Angela, Faulds Karen, Graham Duncan
Royal Society Open Science Vol 5 (2018)
https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.181483
Towards establishing a minimal nanoparticle concentration for applications involving surface enhanced spatially offset resonance Raman spectroscopy (SESORRS) in vivo
Nicolson Fay, Jamieson Lauren E, Mabbott Samuel, Plakas Konstantinos, Shand Neil C, Detty Michael R, Graham Duncan, Faulds Karen
Analyst Vol 143, pp. 5358-5363 (2018)
https://doi.org/10.1039/C8AN01860J
In vivo multiplex molecular imaging of vascular inflammation using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy
Noonan Jonathan, Asiala Steven, Grassia Gianluca, MacRitchie Neil, Gracie Kirsten, Carson Jake, Moores Matthew, Girolami Mark, Bradshaw Angela, Guzik Thomas J, Meehan Gavin R, Scales Hannah, Brewer James M, McInnes Iain B, Sattar Naveed, Faulds Karen, Garside Paul, Graham Duncan, Maffia Pasquale
Theranostics Vol 8, pp. 6195-6209 (2018)
https://doi.org/10.7150/thno.28665
Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based microfluidics for single cell analysis
Willner Marjorie R, McMillan Kay, Graham Duncan, Vikesland Peter J, Zagnoni Michele
Analytical Chemistry (2018)
https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.8b02636
An organic semiconductor laser platform for the detection of DNA by AgNP plasmonic enhancement
McConnell G, Mabbott S, Kanibolotskyy A L, Skabara P J, Graham D, Burley G A, Laurand N
Langmuir (2018)
https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.8b01313
Ratiometric Raman imaging reveals the new anti-cancer potential of lipid targeting drugs
Jamieson Lauren E, Wetherill Corinna, Faulds Karen, Graham Duncan
Chemical Science Vol 9, pp. 6935-6943 (2018)
https://doi.org/10.1039/c8sc02312c

more publications

Research interests

The main focus is the creation of a range of functionalised metallic nanoparticles which can be used for a variety of different purposes which include the diagnosis of disease and also the treatment of disease.  This includes the chemical manipulation of the appropriate surface molecules and labels required to turn these metal nanoparticles into functioning nanosensors capable of detecting single molecules in complex environments using SERS.  In addition, the mounting of therapeutic agents onto these nanoparticles has resulted in significantly increased performance of the drugs when tested against particular disease states.

Professional activities

External Examiner
Examiner
7/2018
Spring Scix
Chair
17/4/2018
Gordon Research Conference on Bioanalytical Sensors
Chair
2018
MRC (Medical Research Council) (External organisation)
Advisor
8/12/2017
Invited seminar - University of Essen
Invited speaker
26/10/2017
Bionanosensing conference
Invited speaker
23/10/2017

more professional activities

Projects

EPSRC i-sense IRC: Ultra-Sensitive Enhanced NanoSensing of Anti-Microbial Resistance (u-Sense)
Graham, Duncan (Principal Investigator) Faulds, Karen (Co-investigator)
01-Jan-2018 - 31-Jan-2022
Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP 2016-2017 University of Strathclyde) | Hislop, Ewan
Edrada-Ebel, Ruangelie (Principal Investigator) Graham, Duncan (Principal Investigator) Faulds, Karen (Co-investigator) Young, Louise (Co-investigator) Hislop, Ewan (Research Co-investigator)
01-Jan-2018 - 01-Jan-2022
SERS Analysis on Reverse Aggregation Control of Cysteamine Coated Gold Nanoparticles (Siu Yee New)
Graham, Duncan (Principal Investigator)
15-Jan-2018 - 31-Jan-2018
Optical Detection of Listeria in the Chilled Food Environment using Bionanosensors (Industrial Partnership Award)
Faulds, Karen (Principal Investigator) Graham, Duncan (Co-investigator)
01-Jan-2018 - 28-Jan-2021
Optical Detection of Listeria in the Chilled Food Environment using Bionanosensors (Industrial Partnership Award) / R170553-1
Faulds, Karen (Principal Investigator) Graham, Duncan (Co-investigator)
01-Jan-2018 - 28-Jan-2021
A new tool for bioimaging based on super resolution Raman microscopy
Graham, Duncan (Principal Investigator) Faulds, Karen (Co-investigator) Marshall, Stephen (Co-investigator)
Raman microscopy is a technique which interacts laser light of a particular wavelength with a target sample resulting in this light being scattered by the sample, the changes in energy of the scattered light is then measured. These changes in energy relate to vibrations from different molecules and produce a vibrational fingerprint of the sample relating to the molecular composition. When conducted using a microscope and a stage which moves, multiple Raman spectra in 2 and 3 dimensions can be acquired to produce an image of the sample based on the intensity and the location of particular vibrations within the sample. This is referred to as a Raman map and is very often a false colour map laid on top of a standard magnified microscope image of the sample, a white light image, e.g. a heat map of intensity of say a protein vibration overlaid on the image of a cell. Conventional Raman microscopy is normally in a confocal mode which means that the highest resolution in spatial terms is half the wavelength of the excitation light so typically around 250 nm. Biological structures and processes are on a much smaller scale and this is a limitation of Raman spectroscopy. An advantage of Raman spectroscopy is that it is label free and reliant on the specific molecular vibrations from the molecules in the interrogation volume, unlike fluorescence microscopy, which is the most commonly used form of optical microscopy in life sciences. However fluorescence microscopy requires addition of a label to the sample which changes the sample composition and can affect the intrinsic biological processes of a biological system. This proposal will produce a new tool to acquire Raman maps and then process the data to enhance the spatial resolution possible from a Raman confocal microscope. We propose to generate sub 100 nm spatial resolution using this tool which will greatly transform the use of Raman spectroscopy and microscopy in the life sciences. This tool will require no addition of labels or hardware modifications to existing Raman microscope instruments.
20-Jan-2017 - 19-Jan-2019

more projects

Address

Pure and Applied Chemistry
Technology Innovation Centre

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