Dr Mark Haw

Senior Lecturer

Chemical and Process Engineering

Personal statement

My research interests are focussed on particles and fluids: from particulates such as mud, cement, soil or pharmaceutical powders to suspensions such as colloids, blood, and swimming bacteria and algae. We study how such 'multiphase' systems respond to conditions such as forces, flow, and interactions with their environment. I am also particularly interested in the role of thermal fluctuations (so-called Brownian motion) in complex fluids and soft matter, whether in colloidal suspensions such as paints and foods or in biological systems such as proteins. We do both experimental and computational research, and collaborate with various industries to better understand processes and fundamental science of applications. I also do a lot of public engagement work, including books and articles, talks, and interactive events.

Expertise

Has expertise in:

    We have the following capabilities and expertise in my research group:

    • rheology/rheometry
    • direct flow visualisation microscopy
    • optical microscopy with fluorescence
    • high speed video
    • computational optical tracking analysis
    • a range of flows which can be studied in situ in microscopy, including channel, shear and squeeze
    • in development: optical tweezing
    • Monte Carlo/diffusive simulations including particle aggregation, gelation and associated analyses

Prizes and awards

EPSRC Grand Challenge Chemistry & chemical engineering, meeting Nov. 08, champion for submission post-meeting 'Artificial life'
Recipient
11/2008

more prizes and awards

Publications

Resonant alignment of microswimmer trajectories in oscillatory shear flows
Hope Alexander, Croze Ottavio A., Poon Wilson C. K., Bees Martin A., Haw Mark D.
Physical Review Fluids Vol 1, pp. 051201-1 - 051201-8, (2016)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevFluids.1.051201
Group work experiences of women students in a Scottish chemical engineering programme
Nisbet Jolan, Haw Mark D., Boon Stuart, Harrington Ross W., Fletcher Ashleigh J.
Education for Chemical Engineers Vol 16, pp. 39-47, (2016)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ece.2016.07.002
Using the perceptions of chemical engineering students and graduates to develop employability skills
Fletcher Ashleigh J., Sharif Abdul Wadood A., Haw Mark D.
Education for Chemical Engineers, pp. 1-29, (2016)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ece.2016.07.001
Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of jamming in thermostatted shear flows
Williams Calum, Haw Mark, Lue Leo
British Society of Rheology Mid-Winter Meeting 2015, (2015)
Effects of secondary metal carbonate addition on the porous character of resorcinol-formaldehyde xerogels
Taylor Stewart J., Haw Mark D., Sefcik Jan, Fletcher Ashleigh J.
Langmuir Vol 31, pp. 13571-13580, (2015)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b02483
The role of thermostats in simulations of jamming
Williams Calum, Haw Mark, Lue Leo, Forsyth Claire, Peixoto Vanesa
24th International Conference on Discrete Simulation of Fluid Dynamics, (2015)

more publications

Teaching

Departmental and Faculty Responsibilities:

  • Director of Teaching
  • Faculty Learning and Teaching Forum
  • Faculty Academic Administration Committee

 

Taught Classes (Chemical Engineering:

  • CP102 Introduction to Chemical Engineering
  • CP303 Materials Processing and Applications
  • CP404 Multiphase systems
  • CP516 Emerging Technologies
  • CP520 Communicating Science and Technology
  • CP407/413 Chemical Engineering Design
  • 18530 Chemical Engineering Project
  • CP926 Multiphase processing

 

Other teaching:

  • Becoming an Engaging Researcher (Cross-faculty public engagement skills)
  • Other ad-hoc public engagement classes

 

Teaching and learning research:

I am part of a small team within the Department which has been working over the past two years on employability, transferable skills and personal development-related issues in teaching and learning, with a particular recent focus on the role of student teamwork and student peer-tutoring to provide 'embedded' personal and professional development for undergraduates.

We are also beginning to look at innovation skills and how undergraduate teaching and student experience can help promote the impact of research into applications, as students graduate and become key players in industry.

Research interests

My research interests are focussed on particles and fluids: from particulates such as mud, cement, soil or pharmaceutical powders to suspensions such as colloids, blood, and swimming bacteria and algae. We study how such 'multiphase' systems respond to conditions such as forces, flow, and interactions with their environment. I am also particularly interested in the role of thermal fluctuations (so-called Brownian motion) in complex fluids and soft matter, whether in colloidal suspensions such as paints and foods or in biological systems such as proteins. We do both experimental and computational research, and collaborate with various industries to better understand processes and fundamental science of applications.

Professional activities

Frankenstein 2.0 -- public talk at Eastercon science fiction convention
Speaker
21/4/2014
New connections in particles and fluids
Organiser
31/3/2014
Cambridge Science Festival invited talk: Frankenstein 2.0
Speaker
14/3/2014
Really Small Science at Glasgow Science Centre
Speaker
19/10/2013
Directed Assembly of Functional Nanomaterials (EPSRC Grand Challenge conference)
Organiser
12/6/2013
Famelab
Speaker
12/3/2012

more professional activities

Projects

Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP 2016-2017 University of Strathclyde) | Mukhopadhyay, Aditi
Haw, Mark (Principal Investigator) Lue, Leo (Co-investigator) Mukhopadhyay, Aditi (Research Co-investigator)
Period 01-Feb-2017 - 01-Feb-2020
Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP - University of Strathclyde) | Sharif, Abdul
Haw, Mark (Principal Investigator) Fletcher, Ashleigh (Co-investigator) Sharif, Abdul (Research Co-investigator)
Period 01-Aug-2015 - 01-Feb-2019
Doctoral Training Partnership (DTA - University of Strathclyde) | Williams, Calum Mclean
Haw, Mark (Principal Investigator) Lue, Leo (Co-investigator) Williams, Calum Mclean (Research Co-investigator)
Period 01-Oct-2014 - 01-Apr-2018
Doctoral Training Grant 2010 | Leckie, Joy Susan
Haw, Mark (Principal Investigator) Leckie, Joy Susan (Research Co-investigator)
Period 01-Oct-2010 - 07-May-2015
Predictive formulation of high-solid content complex dispersions
Haw, Mark (Principal Investigator)
"High-solid-content dispersions of solid particles of size about 1-50 microns in a liquid phase (HSCDs) occur ubiquitously in industrial applications, from cement and ceramic pastes to catalyst washcoats, paints, foods and drilling fluids. The reliable and efficient processing and manufacture of these diverse products presents 'grand challenges' to formulation technology because at high solids volume fraction process flow and product behaviour become increasingly unstable and unpredictable. But achieving high volume fraction is often desirable in many applications: in generic process flow, to maintain throughput and cut energy/materials costs; in ceramics manufacture, higher volume fraction green bodies sinter to mechanically stronger products; increasing volume fraction of a slurry for spray drying reduces drying time; higher volume fraction drilling fluids reduce problems of fluid and gas influx and collapse in bore holes. Conversely, unstable flow at large viscosity is sometimes actually desirable, as long as it is predictable, e.g., in breaking aggregates to disperse catalytic converter washcoats or pigments in a mixer. In all these applications and many others the ability to control and predict rheology for a given formulation--to 'dial up' required behaviour--would transform formulation science and practice with HSCDs. However, experience repeatedly shows that as volume fraction increases, the flow and stress become increasingly unstable, and characterization, measurement, control and prediction increasingly challenging and unreliable. Conventional rheological characterization of HSCDs is often poorly reproducible and also fails to predict correct flow behaviour in the complex, non-rheometric geometries encountered in applications. Notoriously, small changes beyond the manufacturer's control, e.g. due to unforeseen variations in processing conditions or a change in supplier, can have catastrophic effects (e.g. a normally flowable formulation can suddenly fracture rather than flow). On top of this, industrial applications span many length scales, from < 100-particle-diameter extrusion mouldings and printed films to kilometre-deep bore holes so that predicting and characterizing HSCD flow faces the simultaneous requirements of scale up and scale down. Faced with these ubiquitous challenges, and because the basic science of flow at high volume fraction is not understood and predictive engineering tools are not established, formulators often resort to accumulated experience and informal procedures such as 'finger rheology' (rubbing samples between fingers!) to guide their work. Thus, existing formulations are often sub-optimal, and problems arising from these formulations are solved mostly by trial and error, while the risk associated with formulation innovation severely limits development of new products and processes. Our vision, inspired by recent major scientific advances by members of the project team, is to transform practice in the formulation of HSCDs through a tight collaboration of researchers and major multi-sector industry partners. Our new scientific understanding will provide new methodology of characterization, measurement, prediction and control, leading to reliable process and manufacture of HSCD-based products. The project will enable manufacturers to formulate their products according to rational design principles, using parameters deduced from well-characterised reproducible flow measurements. This approach will yield step changes in control and predictability over multiple length scales and multiple application sectors."
Period 03-Oct-2016 - 02-Oct-2019
Really Small Science
Haw, Mark (Principal Investigator)
Period 01-Feb-2015 - 30-Sep-2015

more projects

Address

Chemical and Process Engineering
James Weir Building

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