Dr David Lewin

Senior Lecturer

Education

Personal statement

I am Senior Lecturer in Philosophy of Education at Strathclyde University. With a background in Theology and Religious Studies, as well as a brief but significant career in Computer Science, my work engages with topics at the intersections between philosophy of education, philosophy of religion, and philosophy of technology. My current research focuses on notions of didactical and pedagogical representation and reduction. I co-lead the ‘Experiments in Educational Theory’ research group based at the University of Strathclyde (www.exet.org).

I teach across a range of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes within the School of Education. I am the Course Leader for Joint Honours Education, and students on that programme are welcome to contact me at any time by email. My office is also on the 2nd floor of Lord Hope and students are also welcome to come along to talk with me (best to make an appointment in case I am out).

Expertise

Has expertise in:

    My primary expertise is in conceptual and philosophical research. As part of my work, I supervise a number of Masters and PhD students in different fields of conceptual research. Those fields include for example:

    • Mindfulness in Education
    • Religion and Education
    • Philosophy and Education
    • Spirituality and Mysticism
    • Comparative religious traditions
    • Philosophy of Technology
    • Conceptual issues in the use of technology in education
    • Martin Heidegger
    • Paul Ricoeur

Prizes and awards

Travel funding
Recipient
17/3/2016

more prizes and awards

Publications

Between horror and boredom : fairy tales and moral education
Lewin David
Ethics and Education Vol 15, pp. 213-231 (2020)
https://doi.org/10.1080/17449642.2020.1731107
Introduction : love and desire in education
Aldridge David, Lewin David
Journal of Philosophy of Education Vol 53, pp. 457-459 (2019)
https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9752.12384
Languages of love : the formative power of religious language
Lewin David
Journal of Philosophy of Education Vol 53, pp. 460-476 (2019)
https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9752.12374
Religion and education : framing and mapping a field
Parker Stephen G, Berglund Jenny, Lewin David, Raftery Deirdre
Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and Education Vol 1 (2019)
https://doi.org/10.1163/25895303-12340001
Toward a theory of pedagogical reduction : selection, simplification, and generalization in an age of critical education
Lewin David
Educational Theory Vol 68, pp. 495-512 (2019)
https://doi.org/10.1111/edth.12326
Formations of the postsecular in education
Lewin David
The Routledge Handbook of Postsecularity (2018) (2018)

more publications

Research interests

David has published numerous articles and chapters on such interdisciplinary notions as ‘Silence and Attention’, ‘The Pharmacological nature of Educational Technology,’ and ‘Post-secularism’ as well as on figures such as Meister Eckhart, Martin Heidegger, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, and Paul Ricoeur. David is the sole author of two books: Technology and the Philosophy of Religion (Cambridge Scholars, 2011) and Educational Philosophy for a Post-secular Age (Routledge, 2016). David’s current research focuses on notions of didactical and pedagogical representation and reduction. He co-leads the ‘Experiments in Educational Theory’ research group based at the University of Strathclyde (www.exet.org).

  • Review work (Journals):
    • Reviewer for British Educational Research Association, Philosophy of Education Special Interest Group
    • Reviewer for The Journal of the Philosophy of Education
    • Reviewer for Educational Philosophy and Theory
    • Reviewer for Journal of Education and Christian Belief
    • Reviewer for Angelaki: The Journal of the Theoretical Humanities
    • Book Review Editor for Medieval Mystical Theology: The Journal of the Eckhart Society
  • Review work (books):
    • Routledge (Philosophy of Technology)
    • Routledge (Philosophy of Education)

 

Professional activities

Universal Individuals: National Education in a Globalised Age
Speaker
10/12/2019
Religion, Reductionism and Pedagogical Reduction
Speaker
2/12/2019
Education, Enhancement and the Pursuit of the Good
Participant
29/11/2019
External Examiner for MA Philosophy of Education
Examiner
31/8/2019
Disruptions. The Chronic Crisis of Education
Speaker
31/3/2019
Educational Theory (Journal)
Peer reviewer
2019

more professional activities

Projects

Nanjing Strathclyde research symposium 2017
Roxburgh, David (Principal Investigator) Lewin, David (Principal Investigator)
Joint organiser of 2 day research event on a range of educational themes of interest in Uk/ Chinese Education.
26-Jan-2017 - 27-Jan-2017
Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain Large Grant: 'Educational Philosophy for a Post-secular Age
Lewin, David (Principal Investigator)
This research project involves the completion of a monograph entitled ‘Educational Philosophy for a Post-secular Age’. The book explores the significance of the post-secular turn in philosophy, theology, and religious studies for educational theory. Like the term ‘postmodern’, there are many conceptual issues with the framing of the ‘post-secular’. Firstly, have we ever really been secular? Some philosophers suggest that the secular and the emergence of the post-secular reflect a rather Western Christian conception of being religious, a conception that too readily allows for the division of the public and private. Some religious cultures would find this distinction problematic or even meaningless. This conceptual confusion arises in part because we have a view of religion as having faith in a set of doctrines or truth claims. Again this is a rather limited view of what it means to be religious.
The post-secular age acknowledges that religion has an ongoing important influence on culture and on education particularly. Straightforward secularization theories have to be reexamined in light of what some scholars have called the ‘return of religion’. Furthermore, critical thinking itself must be uncoupled from assumptions around secularization. I will suggest that the post-secular gives form to the spaces between the secular and the confessional, avoiding any simplistic notion of a return of traditional patterns of religious life. As Habermas put it, “a postsecular self-understanding of society as a whole (is one) in which the vigorous continuation of religion in a continually secularizing environment must be reckoned with.” Post-secularism complicates rather than denies the secularization thesis.
The grant runs from 1st October until Christmas 2015. I would like to express my thanks to PESGB and Liverpool Hope University for the generous support for this project.
01-Jan-2015 - 18-Jan-2015
Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain Large Grant: 'Educational Philosophy for a Post-secular Age
Lewin, David (Principal Investigator)
This research project involves the completion of a monograph entitled ‘Educational Philosophy for a Post-secular Age’. The book explores the significance of the post-secular turn in philosophy, theology, and religious studies for educational theory. Like the term ‘postmodern’, there are many conceptual issues with the framing of the ‘post-secular’. Firstly, have we ever really been secular? Some philosophers suggest that the secular and the emergence of the post-secular reflect a rather Western Christian conception of being religious, a conception that too readily allows for the division of the public and private. Some religious cultures would find this distinction problematic or even meaningless. This conceptual confusion arises in part because we have a view of religion as having faith in a set of doctrines or truth claims. Again this is a rather limited view of what it means to be religious.
The post-secular age acknowledges that religion has an ongoing important influence on culture and on education particularly. Straightforward secularization theories have to be reexamined in light of what some scholars have called the ‘return of religion’. Furthermore, critical thinking itself must be uncoupled from assumptions around secularization. I will suggest that the post-secular gives form to the spaces between the secular and the confessional, avoiding any simplistic notion of a return of traditional patterns of religious life. As Habermas put it, “a postsecular self-understanding of society as a whole (is one) in which the vigorous continuation of religion in a continually secularizing environment must be reckoned with.” Post-secularism complicates rather than denies the secularization thesis.
The grant runs from 1st October until Christmas 2015. I would like to express my thanks to PESGB and Liverpool Hope University for the generous support for this project.
01-Jan-2015 - 18-Jan-2015

more projects