Dr David Lewin

Senior Lecturer

Education

Personal statement

I am Senior Lecturer in Philosophy of Education at Strathclyde University. I teach across a range of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes within Education Studies. I am the course Leader for Joint Honours Education, and students on that programme are welcome to contact me at any time by email. My office is also on 2nd floor of Lord Hope and students are also welcome to come along to talk with me (best to make an appointment in case I am out).

 

My research interests include philosophy of education, philosophy of religion and philosophy of technology. I am author of Technology and the Philosophy of Religion (Cambridge Scholars 2011) and have co-edited (with Todd Mei) From Ricoeur to Action: the Socio-Political Significance of Ricoeur’s Thinking (Continuum 2012) and (with Alexandre Guilherme and Morgan White) New Perspectives in Philosophy of Education (Bloomsbury 2014) as well as numerous articles and chapters. I have recently published 'Educational Philosophy for a Post-secular Age' (Routledge, 2016).

 

Current Projects

  • Technology and Christian Flourishing (2018-2020): https://www.christianflourishing.com/
  • Co-edited book with Karsten Kenklies East Asian Pedagogies: Education As trans-/formation across cultures and borders (Springer 2019)
  • Co-edited book with David Aldridge: 'Love and Desire in Education, A Special Issue of Journal of Philosophy of Education' (2019)

Other Recent Publications

  • Recent Reviews of my work

  • Educational Philosophy for a Postsecular Age

 

  • Forthcoming Talks:

 

  • Recent Talks:
  • Nanjing Normal University, China, May 2018
  • University of British Colombia, Canada, June 2018
  • PES Chicago 2018
    • PES Seattle 2017
    • PESGB Oxford 2017
    • Gregynog Conference, 24th-26th Jul 2017
    • Winchester University, 28th Nov 2016
    • Association of University Lecturers in Religious Education, 8th Oct 2016
    • International Network of Philosophers of Education, Warsaw, Poland, 17th Aug 2016
    • Philosophy of Education conference, Tilos, Greece, 3rd Jul 2016
    • Christchurch University, Canterbury, 25th May 2016
    • Leicester People's University, 14th May 2016
    • Philosophy of Education, Toronto, Canada, Mar 2016
    • Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain, Oxford, Apr 2016
    • British Educational Research Association, Leeds, Sep 2016
    • University of Liverpool: 1-3 Jul 2015, Silence: A Semiotics of (in)Significance. Title: Silence and Attention in Education
    • Oxford University: 26th-29th Mar 2015. Philosophy of Education Conference (PESGB) Title: ‘Education without how: the paradoxes of educational and spiritual interventions’
    • Cambridge University: 13th Nov 2014. Philosophy of Education Seminars. Title: ‘Humanising Online Pedagogy: technology, attention and education’

 Research Supervision

I welcome enquiries from potential doctoral students with interests in religion and education, secularism and secularisation, philosophical perspectives on pedagogy and technology 

Publications

Languages of love : the formative power of religious language
Lewin David
Journal of Philosophy of Education (2019)
Religion and education : framing and mapping a field
Parker Stephen G, Berglund Jenny, Lewin David, Raftery Deirdre
Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and Education Vol 1 (2019)
https://doi.org/10.1163/25895303-12340001
Toward a theory of pedagogical reduction : selection, simplification, and generalization in an age of critical education
Lewin David
Educational Theory Vol 68, pp. 495-512 (2019)
https://doi.org/10.1111/edth.12326
Formations of the postsecular in education
Lewin David
The Routledge Handbook of Postsecularity (2018) (2018)
Eastern philosophies of education : Buddhist, Hindu, Daoist, and Confucian readings of Plato’s cave
Lewin David, Ergas Oren
International Handbook of Philosophy of Education (2018) (2018)
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-72761-5_40
Review of 'Reconstructing 'Education' through Mindful Attention: Positioning the Mind at the Center of Curriculum and Pedagogy,' Oren Ergas
Lewin David
Studies in Philosophy and Education (2018)
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11217-018-9603-x

more publications

Research interests

David's research interests focus on the intersections between philosophy of education, philosophy of religion, and philosophy of technology. He has published articles on wide-ranging topics such as contemplation, attention, hermeneutics, and digital pedagogy. See publications list

  • Review work (Journals):
    • Reviewer for British Educational Research Association, Philosophy of Education Special Interest Group
    • Reviewer for The Journal of the Philosophy of Education
    • Reviewer for Educational Philosophy and Theory
    • Reviewer for Journal of Education and Christian Belief
    • Reviewer for Angelaki: The Journal of the Theoretical Humanities
    • Book Review Editor for Medieval Mystical Theology: The Journal of the Eckhart Society
  • Review work (books):
    • Routledge (Philosophy of Technology)
    • Routledge (Philosophy of Education)

 

Professional activities

External Examiner for MA Philosophy of Education
Examiner
31/8/2019
Disruptions. The Chronic Crisis of Education
Speaker
31/3/2019
Educational Theory (Journal)
Peer reviewer
2019
British Sociological Association: Sociology of Religion
Participant
9/7/2018
Human Science Pedagogy
Participant
11/6/2018
Technology and Human Flourishing
Participant
5/6/2018

more professional activities

Projects

Nanjing Strathclyde research symposium 2017
Roxburgh, David (Principal Investigator) Lewin, David (Principal Investigator)
Joint organiser of 2 day research event on a range of educational themes of interest in Uk/ Chinese Education.
26-Jan-2017 - 27-Jan-2017
Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain Large Grant: 'Educational Philosophy for a Post-secular Age
Lewin, David (Principal Investigator)
This research project involves the completion of a monograph entitled ‘Educational Philosophy for a Post-secular Age’. The book explores the significance of the post-secular turn in philosophy, theology, and religious studies for educational theory. Like the term ‘postmodern’, there are many conceptual issues with the framing of the ‘post-secular’. Firstly, have we ever really been secular? Some philosophers suggest that the secular and the emergence of the post-secular reflect a rather Western Christian conception of being religious, a conception that too readily allows for the division of the public and private. Some religious cultures would find this distinction problematic or even meaningless. This conceptual confusion arises in part because we have a view of religion as having faith in a set of doctrines or truth claims. Again this is a rather limited view of what it means to be religious.
The post-secular age acknowledges that religion has an ongoing important influence on culture and on education particularly. Straightforward secularization theories have to be reexamined in light of what some scholars have called the ‘return of religion’. Furthermore, critical thinking itself must be uncoupled from assumptions around secularization. I will suggest that the post-secular gives form to the spaces between the secular and the confessional, avoiding any simplistic notion of a return of traditional patterns of religious life. As Habermas put it, “a postsecular self-understanding of society as a whole (is one) in which the vigorous continuation of religion in a continually secularizing environment must be reckoned with.” Post-secularism complicates rather than denies the secularization thesis.
The grant runs from 1st October until Christmas 2015. I would like to express my thanks to PESGB and Liverpool Hope University for the generous support for this project.
01-Jan-2015 - 18-Jan-2015
Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain Large Grant: 'Educational Philosophy for a Post-secular Age
Lewin, David (Principal Investigator)
This research project involves the completion of a monograph entitled ‘Educational Philosophy for a Post-secular Age’. The book explores the significance of the post-secular turn in philosophy, theology, and religious studies for educational theory. Like the term ‘postmodern’, there are many conceptual issues with the framing of the ‘post-secular’. Firstly, have we ever really been secular? Some philosophers suggest that the secular and the emergence of the post-secular reflect a rather Western Christian conception of being religious, a conception that too readily allows for the division of the public and private. Some religious cultures would find this distinction problematic or even meaningless. This conceptual confusion arises in part because we have a view of religion as having faith in a set of doctrines or truth claims. Again this is a rather limited view of what it means to be religious.
The post-secular age acknowledges that religion has an ongoing important influence on culture and on education particularly. Straightforward secularization theories have to be reexamined in light of what some scholars have called the ‘return of religion’. Furthermore, critical thinking itself must be uncoupled from assumptions around secularization. I will suggest that the post-secular gives form to the spaces between the secular and the confessional, avoiding any simplistic notion of a return of traditional patterns of religious life. As Habermas put it, “a postsecular self-understanding of society as a whole (is one) in which the vigorous continuation of religion in a continually secularizing environment must be reckoned with.” Post-secularism complicates rather than denies the secularization thesis.
The grant runs from 1st October until Christmas 2015. I would like to express my thanks to PESGB and Liverpool Hope University for the generous support for this project.
01-Jan-2015 - 18-Jan-2015

more projects