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Prof Rebecca Lunn

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Prizes and awards

Elected as an Outstanding Woman of Scotland
Recipient
2015
Elected as Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh
Recipient
2014
Elected a Fellow of The Institution of Civil Engineers
Recipient
2014
Leader of the £1.3M EPSRC Research Consortium SAFE Barriers
Recipient
2012
Aberconway medallist 2011. Awarded by the Geological Society of London every 2 years to a researcher aged 45 years or less to recognise distinction in the practice of geology with special reference to work in industry
Recipient
6/2011

more prizes and awards

Publications

An analytical model for the control of silica grout penetration in natural groundwater systems
Pedrotti M., Wong C., El Mountassir G., Lunn R. J.
Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology Vol 70, pp. 105-113, (2017)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tust.2017.06.023
X-ray CT and multiphase flow characterization of a 'bio-grouted' sandstone core : the effect of dissolution on seal longevity
Minto James M., Hingerl Ferdinand F., Benson Sally M., Lunn Rebecca J.
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control Vol 64, pp. 152-162, (2017)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijggc.2017.07.007
Laboratory testing of a MEMS sensor system for in-situ monitoring of the engineered barrier in a geological disposal facility
Yang Wenbin, Lunn Rebecca J, Tarantino Alessandro, El Mountassir Grainne
Geosciences Vol 7, (2017)
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/geosciences7020038
Rock fracture grouting with microbially induced carbonate precipitation
Minto James M., MacLachlan Erica Christine, El Mountassir Grainne, Lunn Rebecca J.
Water Resources Research, (2016)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2016WR018884
Impact of mechanical heterogeneity on joint density in a welded ignimbrite
Soden A.M., Lunn R.J., Shipton Z.K.
Journal of Structural Geology Vol 89, pp. 118-129, (2016)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsg.2016.05.010
Increasing the quality of seismic interpretation
Macrae Euan J., Bond Clare E., Shipton Zoe K., Lunn Rebecca J.
Interpretation Vol 4, pp. T395-T402, (2016)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1190/INT-2015-0218.1

more publications

Research interests

  • Use of microbially mediated mineral precipitation for ground improvement and ground sealing
  • Development and application of colloidal silica-based grouts for ground improvement and ground sealing
  • Development of detectable cementitious grouts for reliable barrier formation
  • Fluid flow in geological faults, estimating fault permeability (particular relevance to radioactive waste disposal, CO2 sequestration and oil and gas exploitation)
  • The relationaship between fault permeability and seismicity - temporal and spatial evolution
  • Predicting ground permeability through structural geology and rock mechanics
  • Groundwater flow and contaminant transport
  • Rock mechanics and structural geology
  • Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems
  • Computer modelling

Professional activities

Scottish Government (External organisation)
Member
2015
Royal Society of Edinburgh (External organisation)
Member
2015
UK Government (External organisation)
Member
2012
Geology (Journal)
Editorial board member
2010
Journal of Structural Geology (Journal)
Guest editor
2010
EPSRC (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council)
Visiting researcher
2010

more professional activities

Projects

Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP 2016-2017 University of Strathclyde) | McKay, Lucy
Shipton, Zoe (Principal Investigator) Lunn, Rebecca (Co-investigator) McKay, Lucy (Research Co-investigator)
Period 01-Jan-2017 - 01-Jul-2020
Underpinning the safety case for the use of colloidal silica based grout for waste containment
Bots, Pieter (Co-investigator) Lunn, Rebecca (Principal Investigator) El Mountassir, Grainne (Co-investigator) Pedrotti, Matteo (Co-investigator) Renshaw, Joanna (Co-investigator)
X-ray Computed Tomography beamtime awarded by Diamond Light Source (STFC) at equivalent funding value of £95,940. Abstract of funded proposal: In the proposed experiments we aim to develop the scientific case to underpin the use of novel colloidal silica based grouts for radioactive waste containment. We aim to use the element specific capabilities of synchrotron based X-ray CT at beamline I13-2 to investigate the effects of the grout injection on the geochemistry of Sr, Cs and U. We will also utilize the time resolved capabilities to determine the influence of complex solid matrices on the (injection) behaviour of the silica grouts.
Period 06-Sep-2017 - 11-Sep-2017
Impacts of colloidal silica grout injection on the geochemistry of radioactive wastes
Renshaw, Joanna (Principal Investigator) Bots, Pieter (Co-investigator) El Mountassir, Grainne (Co-investigator) Lunn, Rebecca (Co-investigator) Pedrotti, Matteo (Co-investigator)
Period 01-Dec-2016 - 31-Mar-2018
Biomineral Technologies for Ground Engineering (Royal Academy of Engineering Research Chair)
Lunn, Rebecca (Principal Investigator)
Period 01-Nov-2017 - 31-Oct-2022
Prosperity Partnership: Delivering Enhanced Through-Life Nuclear Asset Management
McArthur, Stephen (Principal Investigator) Dobie, Gordon (Co-investigator) Gachagan, Anthony (Co-investigator) Hamilton, Andrea (Co-investigator) Lunn, Rebecca (Co-investigator) Michie, Walter (Co-investigator) Pierce, Stephen (Co-investigator) Renshaw, Joanna (Co-investigator) West, Graeme (Co-investigator)
Period 01-Sep-2017 - 31-Aug-2022
Development of Novel Treatments for Carbon-based radioactive wastes
Renshaw, Joanna (Principal Investigator) Lunn, Rebecca (Co-investigator) Switzer, Christine (Co-investigator)
"The nuclear energy and weapons programmes of the past 70 years have created a legacy of waste and contamination around the world. Amongst the very diverse and complicated wastes arising from these programmes are a range of orphan wastes. These are wastes which are not suitable for treatment in existing processing plants and for which there is no currently accepted treatment option.

This project will determine the feasibility of a wholly new approach to treatment of orphan radioactive wastes. The overarching longer-term research vision is for a three-stage waste treatment process. First, smouldering the waste (in the same way that coal smoulders in a fire) to burn the carbon and produce a small volume of stable radioactive ash that can be encapsulated (generally in cement) and placed into a container (comprised of steel or concrete) for future geological disposal. Second, capturing safely the radioactive emissions that are released by the smouldering process. These are in the form of microscopic particles of radionuclides and carbon dioxide gas that contains the radioactive element, Carbon 14. This capture will make use of similar technologies to those being explored to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to tackle climate change. Bacteria will be used to stimulate the production of carbonate and/or phosphate minerals, removing the radioactivity from the gases and capturing them into a stable mineral (i.e. into a rock) . Finally, this process of capturing the radioactivity into a mineral will be performed as part of the encapsulation process either for the radioactive ash (prior to placing it in a container) or for other radioactive wastes, so as to reduce the final volume of radioactive material that requires disposal.

In order for any treatment process of orphan wastes to be accepted by the UK regulatory authorities, it is critical that no radioactive gases are emitted. Hence, this research project will focus on demonstrating the feasibility of capturing (1) 14C as a stable carbonate and (2) other particulate radioactive emissions into stable phosphate minerals. The project will focus on demonstrating feasibility for a single wasteform, graphite, which is the largest volume orphan waste. If feasibility can be demonstrated, other research projects will follow to explore the smouldering process and the use of the carbonate and phosphate minerals for encapsulation of the radioactive ashes, created by the smouldering process."
Period 01-Jul-2017 - 30-Jun-2019

more projects

Address

Civil and Environmental Engineering
James Weir Building

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