Dr Alan Young

Senior Research Fellow

Physics

Publications

First particle-by-particle measurement of emittance in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment
Adams D, Ronald K, Whyte C, Young A, Chatzitheodoridis G,
European Physical Journal C (2019)
Periodic GW level microwave pulses in X-band from a combination of a relativistic backward wave oscillator and a helical waveguide compressor
Macinnes P, Bratman V L, Zhang L, Denisov G G, He W, Kolganov N G, Mcstravick M, Mishakin S V, Robertson C W, Samsonov S V, Whyte C G, Young A R, Ronald K, Phelps A DR, Cross A W
2017 IEEE 21st International Conference on Pulsed Power, PPC 21st IEEE International Conference on Pulsed Power, PPC 2017 (2018)
https://doi.org/10.1109/PPC.2017.8291306
Lattice design and expected performance of the muon ionization cooling experiment demonstration of ionization cooling
Bogomilov M, Young A R, Ronald K, Whyte C G, Dick A J,
Physical Review Accelerators and Beams Vol 20 (2017)
https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevAccelBeams.20.063501
Design and experiments of a five-fold helically corrugated waveguide for microwave pulse compression
Zhang Liang, Mishakin Sergey V, He Wenlong, Samsonov Sergey V, Cross Adrian W, Denisov Gregory G, McStravick Michael, Bratman Vladimir L, Whyte Colin G, Robertson Craig W, Young Alan R, Yin Huabi, Ronald Kevin, Macinnes Philip, Phelps Alan DR
IRMMW-THz 2015 40th International Conference on Infrared, Millimeter, and Terahertz Waves, IRMMW-THz 2015, pp. 1-2 (2015)
https://doi.org/10.1109/IRMMW-THz.2015.7327459
Experimental study of microwave pulse compression using a five-fold helically corrugated waveguide
Zhang Liang, Mishakin Sergey V, He Wenlong, Samsonov Sergey V, McStravick Michael, Denisov Gregory G, Cross Adrian W, Bratman Vladimir L, Whyte Colin G, Robertson Craig W, Young Alan R, Ronald Kevin, Phelps Alan D R
IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques Vol 63, pp. 1090-1096 (2015)
https://doi.org/10.1109/TMTT.2015.2393882
Millimeter-wave components for a helical waveguide gyro-TWA
Robertson C W, Young A R, Ronald K, Cross A W, Whyte C G
2014 39th International Conference on Infrared, Millimeter, and Terahertz Waves (IRMMW-THz) 39th International Conference on Infrared, Millimeter and Terahertz Waves, IRMMW-THz 2014 (2014)
https://doi.org/10.1109/IRMMW-THz.2014.6956498

more publications

Projects

MICE Ionization-Cooling Demonstration
Ronald, Kevin (Principal Investigator) Whyte, Colin (Co-investigator) Young, Alan (Research Co-investigator)
"The Neutrino Factory is a possible future accelerator facility that creates beams of neutrinos from the decays of muons in a storage ring. The neutrino beams from a Neutrino Factory would have the highest intensity and can be controlled with unprecedented accuracy. For these reasons, the Neutrino Factory has the potential to discover measurable differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations, which could be the key to understanding the puzzle of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe. This phenomenon, known as CP violation, has been observed in the quark sector but has never been seen in the neutrino sector. A future Neutrino Factory would determine CP violation in the neutrino sector with the best possible accuracy. Furthermore, a Neutrino factory could be used as a first stage before the construction of a Muon Collider, which could be used to measure the properties of the Higgs boson with the ultimate precision, and could potentially reach energies of up to 6 TeV, in order to explore new physics phenomena at the highest energy frontier.

Both the Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider rely on the acceleration of muons. To be able to create muon accelerator facilities, we require to reduce the size of the muon beam so that it may be accelerated. Since muons decay within 2 microseconds in their own rest frame, the only known way to reduce the phase space of the muon beam before the muons decay is to use the concept of ionisation cooling, in which the muons lose energy in an absorber such as liquid hydrogen or lithium hydride (LiH) and then recover the longitudinal component of the momentum by accelerating them using RF cavities. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an engineering demonstration of the concept of ionisation cooling. This experiment is being built at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, in which a beam of muons will be cooled in a muon cooling cell consisting of three absorbers and two RF cavities inside the field of two focus coil magnets. The emittance of the beam is measured before and after the cooling channel using a scintillating fibre tracker inside a superconducting solenoid, and the muons are identified using time-of-flight detectors, a Cherenkov detector and a calorimeter system consisting of a scintillating fibre-lead pre-shower detector (named the KL) and a totally active scintillating detector, called the Electron Muon Ranger (EMR).

In this proposal we aim to perform measurements of emittance reduction, without RF cavities (MICE step IV) and perform the final demonstration of ionisation cooling with RF cavities. This proposal is a bid for 42 months funding from Oct 2016 to March 2020, supporting academic and student effort over that period and research staff from the end of the bridging support that ends in December 2016."
01-Jan-2017 - 30-Jan-2021
Continuation of UK participation in the International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment - Bridging Funds
Ronald, Kevin (Principal Investigator) Whyte, Colin (Co-investigator) Young, Alan (Research Co-investigator)
"The Neutrino Factory is a possible future accelerator facility that creates beams of neutrinos from the decays of muons in a storage ring. The neutrino beams from a Neutrino Factory would have the highest intensity and can be controlled with unprecedented accuracy. For these reasons, the Neutrino Factory has the potential to discover measurable differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations, which could be the key to understanding the puzzle of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe. This phenomenon, known as CP violation, has been observed in the quark sector but has never been seen in the neutrino sector. A future Neutrino Factory would determine CP violation in the neutrino sector with the best possible accuracy. Furthermore, a Neutrino factory could be used as a first stage before the construction of a Muon Collider, which could be used to measure the properties of the Higgs boson with the ultimate precision, and could potentially reach energies of up to 6 TeV, in order to explore new physics phenomena at the highest energy frontier.

Both the Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider rely on the acceleration of muons. To be able to create muon accelerator facilities, we require to reduce the size of the muon beam so that it may be accelerated. Since muons decay within 2 microseconds in their own rest frame, the only known way to reduce the phase space of the muon beam before the muons decay is to use the concept of ionisation cooling, in which the muons lose energy in an absorber such as liquid hydrogen or lithium hydride (LiH) and then recover the longitudinal component of the momentum by accelerating them using RF cavities. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an engineering demonstration of the concept of ionisation cooling. This experiment is being built at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, in which a beam of muons will be cooled in a muon cooling cell consisting of three absorbers and two RF cavities inside the field of two focus coil magnets. The emittance of the beam is measured before and after the cooling channel using a scintillating fibre tracker inside a superconducting solenoid, and the muons are identified using time-of-flight detectors, a Cherenkov detector and a calorimeter system consisting of a scintillating fibre-lead pre-shower detector (named the KL) and a totally active scintillating detector, called the Electron Muon Ranger (EMR).

In this proposal we aim to perform measurements of emittance reduction, without RF cavities (MICE step IV) and perform the final demonstration of ionisation cooling with RF cavities. This proposal is a bid for 9 months funding from April to December 2016 in order to bridge the current MICE Step IV construction grant that ends in March 2016 and the final demonstration of ionisation cooling, expected to run until 2019."
01-Jan-2016 - 31-Jan-2016
Proposal For Continuation Of Uk Participation In The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment: Requested Additional Proposal For Studentship
Ronald, Kevin (Principal Investigator) Whyte, Colin (Research Co-investigator) Speirs, David (Researcher) Young, Alan (Researcher)
01-Jan-2013 - 31-Jan-2016
Transfer of enabling high power ka-band design capability to industry
Whyte, Colin (Principal Investigator) Phelps, Alan (Co-investigator) Ronald, Kevin (Co-investigator) Young, Alan (Co-investigator) Robertson, Craig (Researcher)
This proposal will transfer knowledge, expertise and experience gained under PPA/F/S/2001/00656, 'Gyro-Amplifiers for high-field-gradient accelerators and industrial applications' to industry. This activity will build upon existing skills in industry which are currently underutilised due to a lack of the necessary expertise and experience. A relatively small investment of time and assistance is required to allow industry personnel to full exploit their capabilities. Strathclyde University is uniquely placed to provide this assistance as a leading research team in the field with an excellent track record both in research and teaching. Our experience in teaching postgraduate candidates from industry as well as academic backgrounds will greatly facilitate the knowledge transfer activities, while our research background provides us with a pre-existing code suite read for industry use. We also have well developed remote teaching experience using video conferencing. This allows us to efficiently update industry expertise and modelling capability to full exploit the most recent advances in simulation code development. We will verify the transfer of design capability to industry with the co-design of a Gyro-TWA interaction region for operation in the Ka-band frequency range. This design will then be validated by the construction and test of a Ka-band Gyro-TWA helically corrugated interaction region. The aim is to demonstrate world leading UK capability in a new atmospheric window. This capability is of interest for several defence applications as well as for use in high resolution RaDAR and space RaDAR. The new capability can also be applied in the areas of future high gradient particle accelerator structures and plasma diagnostics. We will build increased information transfer capability and develop computer simulation model transfer paths between research providers and industrial partners facilitating future co-operative ventures and reducing the time and costs associated with future knowledge transfer activities.
01-Jan-2009 - 31-Jan-2011
Doctoral Training Grant 2008 | Matheson, Kathleen
Ronald, Kevin (Principal Investigator) Young, Alan (Co-investigator) Matheson, Kathleen (Research Co-investigator)
01-Jan-2008 - 03-Jan-2014
research and Design Support to industry for a gyro-TWA research demonstrator programme (phase 2)
Phelps, Alan (Principal Investigator) Cross, Adrian (Co-investigator) Whyte, Colin (Co-investigator) Young, Alan (Co-investigator)
01-Jan-2005 - 31-Jan-2008

more projects

Address

Physics
Technology Innovation Centre

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