News New website makes space for accessibility

The Children and Young People’s Centre for Justice (CYCJ) has launched a new website aimed directly at children, young people and adults who may not be familiar with the justice system.

‘Just the Right Space’ was co-created and produced with young people who have lived experience of the justice and care systems. Although part of CYCJ, it is intended as a ‘standalone’ site for the benefit of a wider audience.

The new website offers information and advice about the criminal justice system and what to expect, children’s rights, stories shared by those with experience of the justice and care systems, and places/groups that can offer further support.

Fiona Dyer, Director of CYCJ, said:

“We are excited to share this new website that we hope will help children, young people and those supporting them, better understand the justice system, who can help, and the rights they’re entitled to. CYCJ is committed to working with and not just for children and young people in conflict with the law. Whilst this has included adapting our research findings into child friendly formats, we were aware that our website is not accessible to those who may not have knowledge of the justice system and associated terminology.

“By working with young people from the very start of this creative process, we hope we have designed a website that will help a wider and younger audience understand what it is we do at CYCJ, why we do it, and access information that can help them with their journey through the justice system.”

Featured resources include adaptations of CYCJ’s ground-breaking research on children’s rights in the justice system and the UNCRC, the use of bail and remand with children in Scotland and guides to the justice system, including The child’s journey: A guide to the Scottish justice system and guidance on young people’s rights in custody.

It also includes details of participation groups that people can get involved in to influence change in the justice and care systems, organisations offering further support, and first-hand stories and experiences to inspire and help others.

Paul was part of this project, sharing his experiences to build the site. He said: “Working on this website project has been an interesting experience. Having the opportunity to share my ideas right from the start meant I felt fully involved and included, and reassured me that I wasn’t just being asked my views as part of a box ticking exercise. I think more projects should be done like this – including young people with experience of the systems in the project from start to finish – as it means the result will be something that really works for young people, and not just what professionals think might work.”

Fiona Dyer concludes:

“This is a work in progress – we want to hear from those using the site how it is for them, and what we can do to improve it. So please don’t hesitate to get in touch with your ideas and suggestions!”

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