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BAHuman Resource Management & Psychology

Why this course?

We offer some of the best teaching in Human Resource Management (HRM) in both Scotland and the UK

The course covers areas such as recruitment and selection, training and developing and managing conflict at work. These are an important part of the management process in all organisations.

In Psychology, you’ll study human behaviour. Psychological research is motivated by the desire to understand both general behaviour (how we learn, remember, co-ordinate our actions and interact with others) and the reason for the differences between individuals such as personality or intelligence.

A joint Honours degree is not accredited for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership by the British Psychological Society.

Create your own course

Modern business is too complex to be covered by a single subject: modern managers need to have a broad outlook.

You choose basic classes in business and other disciplines, alongside the Business School’s Management Development Programme. You’ll study a wide variety of subjects and create a curriculum to suit your interests and needs.

You also have the opportunity to try new subjects, some of which you won’t have experienced at school or college. At the beginning of Year 2, you choose two subjects to continue studying in Years 2 and 3. You’ll also select a third, ‘minor’ subject and take further Management Development skills classes.

Apply under the general UCAS entry code N100, if you’d prefer to discuss your subject choices once you arrive. To study accounting, apply under N400 or one of the other accounting codes listed on the site.

Human Resource Management

What you’ll study

Year 1

The introductory class – Managing People – provides an overview of HRM.

Years 2 & 3

Core classes cover more in-depth HRM theories and techniques. Year 2 focuses upon workplace behaviour from an organisational psychology point of view. Year 3 focuses on more sociological theories. Options include classes in employee development and in equality and diversity.

Year 4

You’ll study a range of specialist classes at single or joint Honours.

Study abroad

In Year 3, you'll have the opportunity to study in Europe, North America and elsewhere for one or two semesters.

Student competitions

The Peter Bain Prize is awarded each year to the student with the highest mark for their dissertation.

The HRM Society

The HRM Society is run by our students for our students. It aims to bring together all year groups into one network where they can share knowledge and practice, awareness of careers and build relationships with alumni and employers.

Psychology

What you'll study

Year 1

You’ll be introduced to the basic principles of learning and the biological bases of behaviour, thinking, memory, personality, social influences on behaviour (Social Psychology), and changes in behaviour throughout the lifespan (Developmental Psychology).

Years 2 & 3

You’ll develop a greater understanding of human development and interaction, cognitive processes, individual differences and biological influences on behaviour. You’ll take an experimental approach to all classes and research and statistical methods are studied in their own right.

Year 4

You can study an area of psychology in greater depth through a choice of optional classes. You'll also study conceptual and historical issues in psychology and submit a dissertation based upon your own research project.

International placement

There's an opportunity for you to take an optional international research placement through Erasmus.

The School of Psychological Sciences and Health has Erasmus exchange agreements with several European universities. We currently have active exchanges with:

  • Humboldt University zu Berlin, Germany
  • Universidad de A Coruna, Spain
  • University of Twente, Netherlands
  • University Tubingen, Germany
  • Radbout University, Nijmegen, Netherlands

For general queries about exchanges to and from the School of Psychological Sciences and Health, please contact Dr Kellyanne Findlay.

Major projects

You can undertake an optional summer research project working with a member of staff. In addition, there are opportunities to apply for funding to complete summer internships between Years 3 and 4.

Facilities

Our high-quality facilities include six purpose-built experimental research laboratories:

  • driving simulator lab
  • memory lab
  • perception and action lab
  • psychophysiology lab
  • psycholinguistics lab
  • oculomotor lab

Postgraduate study 

Psychology graduates can progress into postgraduate training to become professional psychologists. We currently run a number of post-graduate courses which provide additional research training:

Student competitions

We currently award two prizes to exceptional psychology students.

The Gustav Jahoda Prize founded in 1997 in honour of Emeritus Professor Gustav Jahoda, the first Head of the Department of Psychology, is awarded annually on the recommendation of the Board of Examiners to a psychology Honours student for outstanding academic performance in their final year.

The British Psychological Society Undergraduate Award is also awarded annually for outstanding academic performance in the final year. 

Course content

Psychology of Language

The class will explore some of the key issues in psycholinguistic research such as pragmatic aspects of language use, language development, second language processing. You'll understand some of the key concepts in these areas (eg common ground theory, egocentricity in language processing, language transfer), and will be able to critically evaluate the key scientific findings relating to them. You'll also appreciate the main experimental paradigms/techniques that are used in the field. 

Year 1

Management Development Programme 1

Topics

First Year aims to help you make the transition to the university context. Semester 1 is the Thematic Semester: The World of Business Today and covers topics such as:

  • Social-Ethical-Environmental Governance (SEEG)
  • Business Ethics
  • Disruptive Technologies

Semester 2: Functional Semester: Organisations Today covers topics such as:

  • Creativity & Responsibility
  • Marketing & Sustainability across Domains

Class description

The first year of the programme is centred on the construction of knowledge in classroom setting with theoretical constructs developed. For each topic we’ve recorded a video by a Strathclyde academic who is a leading expert in the field.

You’ll watch these lectures in advance of each session and complete a pre-sessional activity. The pre-sessional work then forms the basis of team based activities work in the classroom (groups of 50 and teams of six-seven) where you develop an agreed understanding of the topic and present this to the group.

The feedback gained from this activity then feeds directly into the assessment for the block. You’ll complete 16 assignments in the two semesters of the class.

Human Resource Management

Managing People
In recent years the task of managing employees has been made more challenging by rapid changes in the business environment. This class focuses on the contemporary and practical issues of how people are organised and managed in the workplace and examines theoretical perspectives which help our understanding of the complex relationship between the employer and employee in facilitating the organisation and production of goods and services.

Psychology

Psychology 1a

You'll take this class in semester 1 and are not expected to have any prior knowledge of psychology. It explores learning theory, developmental psychology, personality, biological psychology, and the scientific basis for psychology.

Psychology 1b

This class is taught in semester 2 and covers sensation and perception, cognitive psychology, social psychology, abnormal psychology, and research methods.

Year 2

Management Development Programme 2

Topics

Semester 1 topics include:

  • Working in Business Organisations
  • Working Business Research & Consultancy
  • Working Internationally
  • Working in the Third Sector
  • Rhetorics & Oratory

Semester 2 is about developing the proposal of MDP3; with a presentation and a final report.

Class description

The second year concentrates on developing understanding through industry-specific contextualisation. Sessions are weekly and three hours in length.

The sessions are thematically linked to the pathways for individualised experience in third year whilst also drawing on the theoretical knowledge developed in MDP 1. In order to develop understanding, organisations will deliver a half-day session. This consists of a one hour plenary introduction where the company and case study are introduced. This is followed by the group sessions where you undertake activities in relation to the case study set by the company.

Human Resource Management

Work Psychology
This class develops understanding of managing people from a psychological perspective through understanding behaviour, attitudes, motivation and wellbeing of people at work. Areas covered include what leads to positive employee work attitudes like job satisfaction, organisational commitment, and their outcomes in terms of work behaviour, such as job performance, withdrawal, absenteeism, turnover, fair treatment and trust.
Work Psychology for Human Resource Management
This class looks at applying psychological theories explaining effectiveness and well-being of people at work to Human Resource Management as an approach to managing people and the employment relationships. Areas covered include organisational and individual decision-making relating to the recruitment and selection process, the impact of performance management on employee perceptions, team working, and the impact of leadership on attitudes and trust.

Psychology

Cognition & Neuropsychology

This class reveals how our understanding of higher mental functions has been enhanced through:

  • theoretical and experimental studies of normal human cognition
  • neuropsychological studies of how cognitive functions may be damaged as a result of brain lesions
Topics covered include disorders of the perceptual system, memory and attention, and the role of the frontal lobes in planning, motivation, emotion, and personality.
Introduction to Research Design & Analysis

You'll be introduced to the main features of measurement, research design, and statistical analysis in psychology.

Following a general introduction, the course presents fundamental concepts, issues, and debates in the field of research methods.

You'll also become familiarised with the conceptual basis for inferential statistical testing, and introduced to different inferential statistics. Finally, a brief introduction to qualitative research methods takes place.

Social & Health Psychology

This class introduces social psychological theories and research that provide insights into why people believe what they believe, and why they behave the way they do.

Topics covered include attribution theory, aggression, prosocial behaviour, group influence, norms, conformity, obedience, and attitudes.

It ends with an introduction to health psychology, demonstrating how social psychological principles covered earlier in the class are applied to pressing, real-world health issues such as dietary behaviour, smoking/alcohol-use, and suicide.

Year 3

Management Development Programme 3

The third year of centres on individualised experience in an organisational context through one of the following pathways:

  • Internship/Charities - gain practical experience in a private or third sector organisation. You need to negotiate and locate your own organisation and experience – this is one of the key learning points of the pathway.
  • Research and consultancy - a facility for local small businesses to gain from the experience and expertise of those within SBS. You work on two live business consultancy projects (one in each semester) and, as a team of 6, develop solutions and strategic initiatives for the local SME economy.
  • International experience – only available for students who are undertaking an international exchange for either one semester or full year.
  • Vertically Integrated Projects - working on a cross-faculty basis to research longitudinal projects (including the ‘Bill Gates Toilet Challenge, Solar Panels for Gambia and Enterprise in Schools) you work with a team of students from all levels of study (first year undergraduate to final year PhD) to further the work of the project.

In addition, you’re required to undertake a social responsibility element (this accounts for one quarter of the overall workload).

These have been designed to provide support to the Curriculum for Excellence and the Widening Access to Higher Education programme. There are no formal classes for MDP3 although there is pathway support with the pathway leads and tutor support.

Human Resource Management

Work, Employment & Society
This class critically explores changes in the nature of work, employment and society through investigating the extent to which current developments in the workplace can be seen to represent a fundamental shift in the nature of workplace regulation. It'll provide contrasting and complementary perspectives on workplace behaviour to those provided in year 2.
Employment Relations
You'll be introduced to the British system of employment relations, and the general principles, processes and outcomes. It'll consider different theoretical approaches to the study of employment and industrial relations and then examine the role and objectives of trade unions, employers and the state, and their interactions in collective bargaining, employee participation and industrial conflict.

Psychology

Research Methods in Psychology

This class builds on year 2 and equips you with a broader, more advanced set of methodological and analytic skills. These skills are essential for carrying out the year 4 dissertation and for being able to read and understand articles published in academic journals.

Individual Differences

You're encouraged to think scientifically about conceptual and practical issues related to the study of individual differences, with specific reference to intelligence and personality. You'll gain the chance to put this knowledge into practice by designing your own measurement instrument.

Cognition

You'll be introduced to some of the core topics in cognitive psychology

  • Perception and action, particularly how we perceive time and recognise faces
  • Memory and learning, including models of episodic and working memory
  • Language, including word production, sentence comprehension, and discourse processing
  • Thinking, specifically problem solving, deductive reasoning and judgement and decision making.
Development

This class reviews the ways that children develop from infancy right through to the end of adolescence. Key theories are presented and used to explore the extent to which children’s development is continuous or stage-like and whether specific skills develop more quickly than others. Issues relating to infancy, ‘theory of mind’ (understanding others’ thoughts and beliefs), executive function (planning and monitoring abilities), language, and communication form the core themes in the class.

Psychobiology

The purpose of this class is to provide the opportunity for you to learn the basic principles of brain function, and to encourage you to address the implications of this understanding for their own view of how behaviour is generated. It includes coverage of electrophysiology and psychopharmacology, neuroanatomy, research methods in neuroscience. There are focused sections relating to the visual system and the motor system.

Social Psychology

This class allows you to consider current ideas and positions within social psychology. Four themes drive the class

  • Attitudes and attitude change, covering the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Health Belief Model
  • Identity, with a focus on social, personal and group identities
  • Prejudice, connecting both attitudes and identities, and covering a broad range of areas such as social representations, stereotyping, prejudice and conflict
  • Epistemology, where consideration is given to the theory of knowledge, how social psychological knowledge is produced, and to what effect

Year 4

Human Resource Management

Advanced Organisational Behaviour
This class draws on current themes in work and organisational psychology, and HRM understood from the perspective of micro-organisational behaviour theory and research. It's structured around the concepts of Reframing Organisations and, although the emphasis is on ‘micro’, or individual-level, approaches to organisational behaviour, ‘reframing’ takes into consideration more ‘macro’ or sociological and critical management approaches as well.
HRM & Employment Relations in Public Services

The aim of the module is to provide you with a critical understanding of the context and content of ‘New Public Management’ and alternative public management reform strategies. There's particular reference to impacts on HRM and employment relations.

The module will enable you to compare how different countries’ reform trajectories have impacted on changes in HRM and employment relations.

Human Resources in the Global Economy
This class looks at HRM within a broader understanding of globalization and the international political economy. It places current themes in an international and comparative perspective by analysing and comparing different national ‘models of management’, and a range of employee response to them and, amongst other things, asks questions about the ways in which these management practices are disseminated by multinational companies (MNCs).
Perspective on Work & Employment
This module builds on the year 3 class, Work, Employment and Society, and explores the contribution of social theory to understandings of the contemporary conditions of work and organisations.

Psychology

Dissertation in Psychology

The dissertation is an opportunity for you to undertake an original piece of research, closely supervised by a single member of staff. Planning for the dissertation begins in year 3, and dissertations can be of such high standards that they are subsequently published in peer-reviewed academic journals.

Advanced Organisational Behaviour

This class is offered by the Strathclyde Business School, and draws on current themes in Human Resource Management understood from the perspective of micro-organisational behaviour theory and research. Although the theoretical underpinning of the material covered is primarily about work and organisational issues at the level of individual behaviour in organisations, a contextual understanding of these issues is also encouraged.

 

Advanced Psychological Theory & Practice I & II

If you take only one of these classes, you'll choose two of the following topics.

If you take both these classes, you're permitted to choose four:

  • Qualitative Methods
  • Social Development
  • Psychoanalytic Personality Psychology
  • Cognitive Impairment in Psychological Disorders
  • Practical Aspects of Memory
  • Artificial Intelligence

 

 

Advanced Psychological Theory & Practice I & II topics
Advanced Psychological Theory & Practice

Choice of topics may include:

  • Qualitative Methods
  • Social Development
  • Psychoanalytic Personality Psychology
  • Cognitive Impairment in Psychological Disorders
  • Practical Aspects of Memory
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Perception & Action
  • Forensic Psychology
  • Physiological Psychology
  • Psychology of Language
  • Performance Psychology
  • Health Psychology
  • Neuropsychology of Ageing and Dementia

 

 

Advanced Psychological Theory & Practice III & IV topics
Study abroad
Erasmus International Work Placement

This class is an option which is available to a restricted number of students who'll apply to take part. It involves a placement with a European University partner working in a research team during the summer between years 3 and 4. Additional assessment is the completed during semester 1 of year 4.

Assessment

The majority of classes involve a final unseen exam which is normally at the end of the semester. This is normally supplemented by individual and/or group coursework.

You’ll also be assessed by class tests, essays, practical reports, dissertations and individual presentations.

In some cases, you can get exemption from the final exam if you achieve a specific mark for your coursework (and satisfying attendance requirements).

Learning & teaching

Teaching is over two semesters in blocks of 12 weeks. Classes are taught through lectures, tutorials, and seminars alongside team-based projects, online materials, practice labs, online wikis and interactive sessions using personal response systems.

External contributors from partnership corporate organisations are involved in teaching and/or assessment of student presentations.

The innovative and highly acclaimed Management Development Programme (MDP) is at the core of our undergraduate degrees in the Business School and comprises a series of classes which you take throughout Years 1 to 3.

You develop knowledge and skills in key areas of management, and team-working, communication and decision-making skills, all of which are highly sought-after by employers.

Major employers and alumni from all sectors are involved in the MDP, participating in group sessions, observing student presentations, and providing feedback. Organisations involved include Barclays, Deloitte, Procter & Gamble and Ernst & Young. In first year the best teams are selected to present to senior staff in one of the sponsoring organisations, and there are prizes for the best projects.

The programme builds your confidence and entrepreneurial capabilities, and promotes awareness of globalisation and ethical issues in personal and business decision-making. In Year 3, you develop your own pathway from internships, involvement with business projects, engagement in interdisciplinary activities and business clinics.  



 

Entry requirements

Minimum grades

Required subjects are indicated following minimum accepted grades.

Highers

1st sitting: AAAB or AABBB; 2nd sitting: AAABBB (English B, Maths National 5B/Intermediate 2; Higher Maths B for combinations with Finance)

A Levels

Minimum entry requirements: BBB (GCSE English Language B or Literature B; Maths GCSE B/A Level B for combinations with Finance)

Typical entry requirements: ABB (GCSE English Language B or Literature B; GCSE Maths B/A Level B for combinations with Finance)

International Baccalaureate

36 (no subject below 5 and including English SL5, Maths/Maths Studies SL5)

HNC/HND

Successful completion of relevant HNC/HND at first attempt with A passes in all graded Units.  Contact Business School Admissions for advice on entry to Year 2.

Irish Leaving Certificate

AAABBB at Higher level, including English and Maths

Required subjects
  • English: Higher level B
  • Maths: Ordinary level at B or Higher level at B for combinations with Finance
  • Maths for combinations with Mathematics & Statistics: Higher level A

Additional information

Advanced Highers

An Advanced Higher and a Higher are given equal credit and the grades for each qualification count towards the total grades required.

Deferred entry

Deferred entry not accepted.

Admission to Honours

All students will be admitted as potential Honours students. Students may exit with a Bachelor of Arts degree at the end of year three of the Honours programme if they have accumulated at least 360 credits and satisfied the appropriate specialisation requirements. For admission to the final year of the Honours course, a student must have qualified for the award of the Bachelor of Arts degree and achieved an approved standard of performance.

English language requirement

A pass in an English language qualification is normally required from applicants outside the UK whose first language is not English. The following provides information on the main qualifications considered for entry to the Business School undergraduate degree courses.

IELTS: Minimum overall band score of 6.5 (no individual test score below 5.5)

Widening access

We want to increase opportunities for people from every background. Strathclyde selects our students based on merit, potential and the ability to benefit from the education we offer. We look for more than just your grades. We consider the circumstances of your education and will make lower offers to certain applicants as a result.

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

International students

Find out entry requirements for your country.

Degree preparation course for international students

We offer international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for an undergraduate degree at Strathclyde the option of completing an Undergraduate Foundation year programme at the International Study Centre.

You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Fees & funding

How much will my course cost?

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Scotland/EU

  • TBC

Rest of UK

  • 2017/18 - £9,250

The 2018-19 fee rate will be updated when it has been confirmed by the UK and Scottish Governments. Assuming no change in Rest of UK fees policy over the period, the total amount payable by undergraduate students will be capped. For students commencing study in 2017/18, this is capped at £27,750 (with the exception of the MPharm and Integrated Masters courses); MPharm students pay £9,250 for each of the four years. Students studying on Integrated Masters degree programmes pay an additional £9,250 for the Masters year with the exception of those undertaking a full-year industrial placement where a separate placement fee will apply.

International

  • £14,050

Additional fees 

Human Resource Management 

Course materials & costs 

Students are encouraged to purchase the core textbook for each Human Resource Management module.  

  • approximate cost - £40 to 50 per textbook

Other costs

PG Diploma and MSc Human Resource Management is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Personal Development (CIPD). Students wishing to achieve the Associate Membership of CIPD are required to join as a student member during studies.  This is not a mandatory requirement for passing the course but is required by CIPD to achieve membership update on passing the course.

Costs for 2015/16 membership:

  • £40 admission fee 
  • £90 annual subscription  

Psychology

Course materials & costs

All recommended texts and computer software packages are available from the University Library and Pegasus.

Other costs

Students should purchase a standard calculator. It's required for the duration of the course.

Please note: All fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my studies?

Students from Scotland and the EU

If you're a Scottish or EU student, you may be able to apply to the Student Award Agency Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government. Scottish students may also be eligible for a bursary and loan to help cover living costs while at University.

For more information on funding your studies have a look at our University Funding page.

Students from England, Wales & Northern Ireland

We have a generous package of bursaries on offer for students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales

You don’t need to make a separate application for these. When your place is confirmed at Strathclyde, we’ll assess your eligibility. Have a look at our scholarship search for any more funding opportunities.

International Students (Non UK, EEA)

We have a number of scholarships available to international students. Take a look at our scholarship search to find out more.

Available scholarships

We have a wide range of scholarships available. Have a look at our scholarship search to find a scholarship.

Careers

Your people-management skills and specialist knowledge will really broaden your career prospects. A degree in Human Resource Management from Strathclyde is valued by employers.

Our HRM graduates find jobs in insurance, retail, manufacturing, recruitment consultancy and in the public sector. Some are employed in jobs such as HR trainee, HR assistant and recruitment consultant whilst others are employed in general administration and management.

Psychology graduates can continue their studies to become professional psychologists and work in areas such as clinical, educational, occupational psychology, or in research.

Among the range of other possible careers are teaching, human resource management, careers guidance, social work, market research, recruitment consultancy, counselling, management and professional positions throughout the private and public sectors.

Contact us

Apply

How to apply – 10 things you need to know

  1. All undergraduate applications are made through UCAS
    Go to the UCAS website to apply – you can apply for up to five courses.
  2. It costs £12 to apply for a course
    The cost is £23 for two to five courses.
  3. The deadline is 15 January each year
    This is the application deadline for most courses. However, please check the details for your particular course. View a full list of UCAS key dates.
  4. You might be asked to attend an interview
    Most of our courses make offers based on the UCAS application. However some might ask you to attend an interview or for a portfolio of work. If this is the case, this will be stated in the prospectus entry requirements.
  5. It’s possible to apply directly to Year 2
    Depending on your qualifications, you might be able to apply directly to Year 2 - or even Year 3 - of a course. Speak to the named contact for your course if you want to discuss this.
  6. There’s three types of decision
    • unconditional – you’ve already met our entry requirements
    • conditional – we’ll offer you a place if you meet certain conditions, usually based on your exams
    • unsuccessful – we’ve decided not to offer you a place
  7. You need to contact UCAS to accept your offer
    Once you’ve decided which course you’d like to accept, you must let UCAS know. You don’t need to decide until you’ve received all offers. UCAS will give you a deadline you must respond by.

    You’ll choose one as your firm choice. If the offer is unconditional or if you meet the conditions, this is the course you’ll study.

    You’ll also have an insurance choice. This is a back-up option if you don’t meet the conditions of your first choice.
  8. You don’t need to send us your exam results (Scotland, England & Wales)
    If you’re studying in Scotland, England or Wales, we receive a copy of your Higher/Advanced Higher/A Level results directly from the awarding body. However, if you are studying a different qualification, then please contact us to arrange to send your results directly.
  9. We welcome applications from international students

    Find out further information about our entry and English language requirements.

    International students who don’t meet the entry requirements, can apply for our pre-undergraduate programmes.

    There’s also an online application form.

    For further information:
  10. Here’s a really useful video to help you apply

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