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LLBLaw (part-time)

Why this course?

This course is delivered during the day with fortnightly tutorials on the weekends and we try to make sure that lectures are grouped together to minimise the number of visits required to the campus each week. 

The part-time LLB is open to you if you want to enter university for the first time after a period out of formal education (adult returners) and to those who already hold a degree in another discipline (graduate entrants).

Part-time study of the LLB normally takes six years (five for graduate entrants). 

At the end of the period of study, you'll graduate with a qualifying ordinary degree in Scots Law, recognised by the Law Society of Scotland as a necessary precondition for entry into the Scottish legal profession. Opportunities exist for further honours level study, and to progress to the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice.

As a part-time student at Strathclyde you'll benefit from being taught by expert academic staff in small groups in a friendly and supportive environment. You'll also have access to the same excellent library and other university facilities as full-time students, and can take advantage of extra-curricular opportunities, such as Strathclyde’s award-winning Law Clinic and our mooting programme.

Facilities

Law Clinic

Strathclyde’s Law Clinic is run by students for members of the public who cannot afford a lawyer and are not eligible for legal aid.

More than 200 of our students are now involved and regularly represent clients in Small Claims and Sheriff Courts.

Students receive basic training in legal skills, such as interviewing, negotiation and advocacy and (in the Clinical Legal Practice course) reflecting on experiences and on the ethics and justice of legal practice. Assessment in relevant courses such as Employment Law and Housing Law will be partly on the basis of students’ handling of cases.

Find out more about our Law Clinic.

Accreditation

The part-time LLB is accredited by the Law Society Scotland.

Course content

In order to graduate from the part-time LLB, you must obtain passes in classes worth 360 credits.

Each class is worth 20 credits and part-time students take four classes per year, with the exception of the final year of study when you're required to take 40 credits and have the option of taking an additional two elective classes.

Adult returners normally complete the degree in five years. Graduate entrants are awarded 80 credits on entry in recognition of their prior study on entry, and so normally complete the degree in four years.

Subject to satisfactory progress, both adult returners and graduate entrants have the option of applying to accelerate their studies by one year.

Adult returner (part-time) typical pattern of study

Year 1

Criminal Law

This course considers everything from the theory of why and how someone is held responsible for criminal actions, to many specific crimes, including murder, the less serious crimes of personal violence, crimes of dishonesty, breach of the peace and attempting to pervert the course of justice.

Legal Methods

The aims of this class are to:

  • provide students with a basic knowledge of the history, structure and institutions of the Scottish legal system
  • provide students with the skills required to find, interpret and analyse the law applicable in Scotland, from all their various sources
  • introduce students to competing conceptions of law
  • introduce students to legal reasoning
Legal Process
The aims of this class are to:
  • enable students to comprehend the structure, function, operation and proposals for reform of the courts and tribunals in Scotland
  • introduce students to the institutions and people involved in legal processes in Scotland
  • expose students to an established body of socio-legal scholarship on legal process and to encourage students to use this knowledge to critically assess liberal rule of law ideology
  • consider the professional personnel who inhabit the legal world and to examine within broader social and comparative context their respective roles and functions, their recruitment, training, complaints procedures and disciplinary sanctions
  • explore on a comparative basis social, political and economic issues in relation to the provision of legal services in Scotland
Public Law 1

Following on from the introduction to the constitution – its key actors, institutions and their functions – in Public Law 1, students taking Public Law 2 will build upon that knowledge here: first by focusing on the ways in which legal (judicial review) and quasi-legal (tribunals, public inquiries, ombudsmen) bodies supervise the exercise of constitutional and administrative decision making; secondly, by a detailed analysis of the political and legal mechanisms which exist for the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms. As such, Public Law 2 is concerned with the abuse of power, and the ways and means by which power can be limited and held to account – whether that is the power of a golf club to suspend an unruly member, the power of a local authority to order the compulsory purchase of privately owned property, or the power of the Prime Minister to wage war.

Year 2

Law & Society

This class engages with some challenging problems faced by law within contemporary society. It introduces students to some aspects of the social, political, and ethical conditions in which law operates. It deals with the interaction of law with justice, politics, morals and equality. The course will examine the role and challenges of law in times of social change. The course is structured around three key themes:

  • legal reasoning
  • law & politics
  • law & social change

 

Public Law 2

Following on from Public Law 1, Public Law 2 aims to consolidate knowledge and understanding of constitutional and administrative law. Students taking this class will require to have taken Public Law 1 in the first year. It'll build upon knowledge of the key concepts and institutions of the UK constitution. As a second year class, its rationale is to give students the opportunity to progress from an understanding of the constitution to an understanding of the role of the law in the constitutional control of public power. This course encourages students to adopt an evaluative and critical stance towards ongoing constitutional developments. The course will focus on control of administrative action, both by the judiciary and by ombudsmen. The protection of individual rights will be a key feature, focusing on judicial protection but also encompassing the role of human rights institutions in the UK and Scotland. The future control of public power will be discussed, including topical debates concerning constitutional reform in this area.

Voluntary Obligations: Contract & Promises

While the most obvious aim of this course is to familiarise students with Scottish contract law and voluntary obligations, this aim may be divided into a number of sub-aims. They are as follows:

  • to place voluntary obligations within the general framework of Scots Law
  • to place the Scots law of voluntary obligations within its European context
  • to analyse and explain how contracts and promises are formed
  • to analyse and explain how voluntary obligations may be vitiated and on what grounds their validity may be challenged
  • to analyse and explain the substance of contracts and how the inclusion and exclusion of rights and liabilities is circumscribed by law
  • to analyse and explain how contracts break down or otherwise come to an end and the remedies available when they do
Involuntary Obligations: Delict & Unjustified Enrichment

The design of this class is primarily aimed at enhancing students’ ability to read cases, deal with case law and apply the techniques of case-analysis and common law development.

The student will acquire an in-depth and up to date knowledge and understanding, from both a legal and a social perspective, of the rules of law governing involuntary obligations, that is to say the law of delict and the law of unjustified enrichment.

Students will acquire the ability to apply the rules of law to particular fact situations in order to provide definitive answers to the problems exposed in these situations.

Students will develop critical and reasoning skills, giving them the ability to make and present personal and informed judgments on the rules of law and their application within the domestic legal system.

Year 3

Domestic Relations

Family law concerns the control which the law exerts over domestic relationships and families; it affects everyone to a greater or lesser degree.

Topics include:

  • the legal status of children, parental responsibilities and rights and the upbringing of children - including issues in adoption and fostering, local authority care and the Children's Hearing system
  • legal consequences of marriage/civil partnership
  • divorce - including what happens to the family and its financial consequences
  • unmarried domestic relations, opposite-sex and same-sex
Commercial Law

Commercial law is a second year compulsory subject on the LLB (and LML) degree. The class provides students with an understanding of commercial law in a Scottish context. It partially meets the commercial law subject requirements and related skills outcomes of the Law Society of Scotland and the Faculty of Advocates (albeit that some of the commercial professional topics, eg sale of goods and insurance law, are dealt with by other courses).

Building on the knowledge acquired by students in first year, the general academic objective of the course is to examine the basic principles and rules concerning core aspects of commercial law, including the main principles of agency, partnership and company law, the law relating to various methods of payment (including consumer credit and bills of exchange) the rules governing the ways in which creditors can ‘secure’ repayment of a debt (eg through taking personal guarantees from third parties for repayment of the debt, or by establishing rights in security over debtor property); the basic principles of diligence; the consequences of both corporate and individual debtor inability to repay debts (corporate insolvency and personal bankruptcy respectively).

While the focus of the class is on ‘a black letter’ analysis of relevant statutory and common law in the broad commercial area, in order to aid understanding of relevant principles, the class also examines the policy rationales underlying the current law and recent and projected reforms in this area.

Property Trusts & Succession

The general rationale of this class is to provide students with a contemporary understanding of the law of property, trusts and succession in Scotland, and to meet Law Society of Scotland requirements in this subject-area.

EU Law

The EU law class focuses on the constitutional and institutional order of the EU as well as on the internal market. To this end, the class looks at the European integration process, the EU institutions, EU competences, the decision-making process within the EU, the principles underpinning the EU legal order and the principles governing the internal market.

Year 4

Evidence

The main focus of the course is on providing an overview of how the handling and proving of facts works in law and how this interacts with the law of evidence. The emphasis is on understanding and application, rather than the learning of the specific details of legal rules.

The course has three general academic aims:

  • to introduce students to theoretical and practical issues relating to the use and proof of facts in the Scottish legal system
  • introduce students to the central concepts, rules and principles of the Scots law of Evidence
  • give students an understanding of the interrelationship between the theory, practice and law relating to the use and proof of facts in the Scottish legal system
Elective Classes

You'll take a choice of three elective classes at this stage.

Year 5

Elective classes

You'll take a choice of two elective classes to complete the degree.

Additional classes

You'll have the option of taking two additional classes - this is not compulsory to complete the degree.

Graduate entry (part-time) typical pattern of study

Year 2

Criminal Law

This course considers everything from the theory of why and how someone is held responsible for criminal actions, to many specific crimes, including murder, the less serious crimes of personal violence, crimes of dishonesty, breach of the peace and  attempting to pervert the course of justice.

Legal Methods

The aims of this class are to:

  • provide students with a basic knowledge of the history, structure and institutions of the Scottish legal system
  • provide students with the skills required to find, interpret and analyse the law applicable in Scotland, from all their various sources
  • introduce students to competing conceptions of law
  • introduce students to legal reasoning
Legal Process

The aims of this class are to:

  • enable students to comprehend the structure, function, operation and proposals for reform of the courts and tribunals in Scotland
  • introduce students to the institutions and people involved in legal processes in Scotland
  • expose students to an established body of socio-legal scholarship on legal process and to encourage students to use this knowledge to critically assess liberal rule of law ideology
  • consider the professional personnel who inhabit the legal world and to examine within broader social and comparative context their respective roles and functions, their recruitment, training, complaints procedures and disciplinary sanctions
  • explore on a comparative basis social, political and economic issues in relation to the provision of legal services in Scotland
Public Law 1

Following on from the introduction to the constitution – its key actors, institutions and their functions – in Public Law 1, students taking Public Law 2 will build upon that knowledge here: first by focusing on the ways in which legal (judicial review) and quasi-legal (tribunals, public inquiries, ombudsmen) bodies supervise the exercise of constitutional and administrative decision making; secondly, by a detailed analysis of the political and legal mechanisms which exist for the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms. As such, Public Law 2 is concerned with the abuse of power, and the ways and means by which power can be limited and held to account – whether that is the power of a golf club to suspend an unruly member, the power of a local authority to order the compulsory purchase of privately owned property, or the power of the Prime Minister to wage war.

Year 3

Law & Society

This class engages with some challenging problems faced by law within contemporary society. It introduces students to some aspects of the social, political, and ethical conditions in which law operates. It deals with the interaction of law with justice, politics, morals and equality. The course will examine the role and challenges of law in times of social change. The course is structured around three key themes:

  • legal reasoning
  • law & politics
  • law & social change

 

Public Law 2

Following on from Public Law 1, Public Law 2 aims to consolidate knowledge and understanding of constitutional and administrative law. Students taking this class will require to have taken Public Law 1 in the first year. It'll build upon knowledge of the key concepts and institutions of the UK constitution. As a second year class, its rationale is to give students the opportunity to progress from an understanding of the constitution to an understanding of the role of the law in the constitutional control of public power. This course encourages students to adopt an evaluative and critical stance towards ongoing constitutional developments. The course will focus on control of administrative action, both by the judiciary and by ombudsmen. The protection of individual rights will be a key feature, focusing on judicial protection but also encompassing the role of human rights institutions in the UK and Scotland. The future control of public power will be discussed, including topical debates concerning constitutional reform in this area.

Voluntary Obligations: Contract & Promises

While the most obvious aim of this course is to familiarise students with Scottish contract law and voluntary obligations, this aim may be divided into a number of sub-aims. They are as follows:

  • to place voluntary obligations within the general framework of Scots Law
  • to place the Scots law of voluntary obligations within its European context
  • to analyse and explain how contracts and promises are formed
  • to analyse and explain how voluntary obligations may be vitiated and on what grounds their validity may be challenged
  • to analyse and explain the substance of contracts and how the inclusion and exclusion of rights and liabilities is circumscribed by law
  • to analyse and explain how contracts break down or otherwise come to an end and the remedies available when they do
Involuntary Obligations: Delict & Unjustified Enrichment

The design of this class is primarily aimed at enhancing students’ ability to read cases, deal with case law and apply the techniques of case-analysis and common law development.

The student will acquire an in-depth and up to date knowledge and understanding, from both a legal and a social perspective, of the rules of law governing involuntary obligations, that is to say the law of delict and the law of unjustified enrichment.

Students will acquire the ability to apply the rules of law to particular fact situations in order to provide definitive answers to the problems exposed in these situations.

Students will develop critical and reasoning skills, that is an ability to make and present personal and informed judgments on the rules of law and their application within the domestic legal system.

Year 4

Domestic Relations

Family law concerns the control which the law exerts over domestic relationships and families; it affects everyone to a greater or lesser degree.

Topics include:

  • the legal status of children, parental responsibilities and rights and the upbringing of children - including issues in adoption and fostering, local authority care and the Children's Hearing system
  • legal consequences of marriage/civil partnership
  • divorce - including what happens to the family and its financial consequences
  • unmarried domestic relations, opposite-sex and same-sex
Commercial Law

Commercial law is a second year compulsory subject on the LLB (and LML) degree. The class provides students with an understanding of commercial law in a Scottish context. It partially meets the commercial law subject requirements and related skills outcomes of the Law Society of Scotland and the Faculty of Advocates (albeit that some of the commercial professional topics, eg sale of goods and insurance law, are dealt with by other courses).

Building on the knowledge acquired by students in first year, the general academic objective of the course is to examine the basic principles and rules concerning core aspects of commercial law, including the main principles of agency, partnership and company law, the law relating to various methods of payment (including consumer credit and bills of exchange) the rules governing the ways in which creditors can ‘secure’ repayment of a debt (eg through taking personal guarantees from third parties for repayment of the debt, or by establishing rights in security over debtor property); the basic principles of diligence; the consequences of both corporate and individual debtor inability to repay debts (corporate insolvency and personal bankruptcy respectively).

While the focus of the class is on ‘a black letter’ analysis of relevant statutory and common law in the broad commercial area, in order to aid understanding of relevant principles, the class also examines the policy rationales underlying the current law and recent and projected reforms in this area.

Property Trusts & Succession

The general rationale of this class is to provide students with a contemporary understanding of the law of property, trusts and succession in Scotland, and to meet Law Society of Scotland requirements in this subject-area.

EU Law

The EU law class focuses on the constitutional and institutional order of the EU as well as on the internal market. To this end, the class looks at the European integration process, the EU institutions, EU competences, the decision-making process within the EU, the principles underpinning the EU legal order and the principles governing the internal market.

Year 5

Evidence

The main focus of the course is on providing an overview of how the handling and proving of facts works in law and how this interacts with the law of evidence. The emphasis is on understanding and application, rather than the learning of the specific details of legal rules.

The course has three general academic aims:

  • to introduce students to theoretical and practical issues relating to the use and proof of facts in the Scottish legal system
  • introduce students to the central concepts, rules and principles of the Scots law of Evidence
  • give students an understanding of the interrelationship between the theory, practice and law relating to the use and proof of facts in the Scottish legal system
Elective classes

You'll have the choice of taking one elective class at this stage.

Additional classes

You'll have the option of taking two additional classes at this stage. This is not compulsory for the degree.

Assessment

Exams and other assessments take place at the end of each semester. You're expected to be available throughout each semester and exam period, and should not book holidays or make other commitments during those times.

Learning & teaching

The academic year is split into two twelve week semesters. Part-time LLB students take two classes in each semester. The academic year normally runs from the end of September until June. Exact semester dates and university holidays are specified in the university calendar.

Entry requirements

Minimum grades

Adult returners

Adult returners are people who have had time out of formal education before applying to university. To be considered an adult returner:

  • there must be a gap of at least three years between you completing secondary education and applying to university
  • you must be at least 21 years old on the date the course starts
  • you must show evidence of academic attainment within the past five years
Qualifications

We will normally make an offer if you have any of the following qualifications:

  • SQA Highers - four Highers at BBBB, preferably including English and other essay-based humanities subjects, taken in one sitting. In exceptional circumstances, Highers taken over two sittings may be accepted, but the entry requirement may be higher. If Highers were taken over several years, applicants must demonstrate that they have the capacity to cope with two Highers in one year, and to cope with taking Highers in several disciplines.
  • GCE A Levels - two A levels in relevant subjects at BB. AS levels are not acceptable. The applicant has to demonstrate that they could cope with the range of subjects taken in first year. A level General Studies is not normally accepted.
  • HND ApplicantsHND in Legal Studies Award with AABB in the Integrative Assessments; or 11 Merit passes; or AAB in the Graded Units. Other HND courses may be considered. A detailed syllabus should be sent when applying.
  • Open University - two full Open University units amounting to no fewer than 60 credit points in a relevant discipline (comprising one Foundation unit and another unit in Humanities or Social Science)
  • Strathclyde Pre Entry Certificate Course - award of Strathclyde Pre-entry Certificate with a Final mark of 65% from three modules including Law, English and one other. We also welcome applications from applicants who have undertaken a similar Pre-entry Certificate at another university. These will be looked at on an individual basis.
  • Other Qualifications - the Law School may also admit applicants whose qualifications do not conform to the above requirements but who present other evidence that indicates to the academic selector that they have the capacity and commitment to pursue the course of study e.g. Police Sergeant Exams, relevant Paralegal course, other professional qualifications obtained in employment.
Mature entry test

If your qualifications are more than five years old, you may be invited to sit the Mature Entry Test (MET). Exceptional candidates who do not otherwise meet the entry requirements may also be invited to sit the MET. In general the more mature the candidate, the more likely it is that the Pre-Entry Certificate course rather than the MET would be the appropriate route for entry.

Applicants invited to sit the MET will take the test at Strathclyde University at a mutually convenient time to be arranged. Candidates will be required to write three short essays on a range of topical legal issues under examination conditions. No prior legal knowledge is required. The test is designed to assess your writing and reasoning skills, and your ability to present coherent arguments.

A candidate who, in the opinion of the course selector, passes the MET will normally be made an offer.

Graduate entrants (part-time LLB route only)

Successful applicants must have an undergraduate degree in a relevant discipline. Normally, applicants should have a First or second-class Honours degree or an Ordinary degree which demonstrates strong academic achievement.

Students who do not meet these requirements may be considered at the discretion of the academic selector and may be asked to sit the Mature Entry Test (see above). 

All applicants must be at least 21 years old on start date of the course.

Further information

If you wish to discuss our entry requirements further, please telephone: +44 (0)141 548 3738 or email our courses support team.

Widening access

We want to increase opportunities for people from every background. Strathclyde selects our students based on merit, potential and the ability to benefit from the education we offer. We look for more than just your grades. We consider the circumstances of your education and will make lower offers to certain applicants as a result.

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

International students

Find out entry requirements for your country.

Degree preparation course for international students

We offer international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for an undergraduate degree at Strathclyde the option of completing an Undergraduate Foundation year programme at the International Study Centre.

You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Fees & funding

How much will my course cost?

All fees quoted are per academic year unless stated otherwise.

2018/19

Part-time adult returner
  • £3,120
Part-time adult returner accelerated stream
  • Year 3: £4,680
  • Year 4: £6,240
Graduate entrant 
  • £3,900
Graduate entrant accelerated stream
  • from Year 3, Year 3 fee: £5,850
  • from Year 3, Year 4 fee: £5,850
  • from Year 4: £7,800

Please note

  • Fees are payable for each year of study. Fees may be subject to an annual increase.
  • Students can opt to pay their fees in three instalments, due at registration, in December and in March.
  • The stated fees apply to students from Scotland, the rest of the UK, and the European Union. International students will not normally granted a visa for part-time study.
  • Students who opt to accelerate their studies will be liable to pay a higher fee.

Funding

Adult returners may be eligible for a part-time fee grant from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS). Further information is available at the SAAS website or by calling 0300 300 3137.

Graduate entrants are not normally eligible for funding via SAAS and may wish to consider Employer Sponsorship or Graduate Development Loans.

Additional advice on funding may be obtained from:

Scholarships

Find out about available scholarships using our Scholarship search

International Study Centre

Additional fees 

Course materials & costs 

Recommended text for first year Law module 'Law & Society' M9113 costs £30. 

Please note: All fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my studies?

Students from Scotland and the EU

If you're a Scottish or EU student, you may be able to apply to the Student Award Agency Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government. Scottish students may also be eligible for a bursary and loan to help cover living costs while at University.

For more information on funding your studies have a look at our University Funding page.

Students from England, Wales & Northern Ireland

We have a generous package of bursaries on offer for students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales

You don’t need to make a separate application for these. When your place is confirmed at Strathclyde, we’ll assess your eligibility. Have a look at our scholarship search for any more funding opportunities.

International Students (Non UK, EEA)

We have a number of scholarships available to international students. Take a look at our scholarship search to find out more.

Available scholarships

We have a wide range of scholarships available. Have a look at our scholarship search to find a scholarship.

Careers

The LLB has an obvious appeal to anyone wishing to develop a career in the legal profession. A law degree is also seen as an equally attractive option for a variety of individuals and employers in areas as diverse as teaching, public sectors, housing, administration, social and welfare services as well as commerce and industry generally.

The LLB degree is both an academic discipline worthy of study in its own right and a qualification paving the way for entry to the Scottish legal profession.

The educational route to enter the legal profession

After completion of an LLB, it is necessary to complete the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice. Places on the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice are limited and are awarded by reference to academic performance.

After completion of the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice, intending solicitors need to undertake a two year traineeship in a law firm. Applications are made directly to law firms and there is increasing competition for traineeship places each year.

Graduates wishing to join the Scottish Bar, as an advocate, have to do a one year Bar traineeship in a solicitors firm. This is followed by nine months ‘devilling’ (training) with an existing advocate.

Further information

For further information about careers as a solicitor or an advocate, please visit the following websites:

Please also note that gaining an LLB does not guarantee a career as a solicitor or advocate. The LLB is a well-respected degree and considered to be a solid foundation for a number of different career paths.

Contact us

Apply

Applications are now open for 2017 entry.

To apply, please download the application form and submit it along with two references:

Application form

PT LLB Application Form for Entry 2017   

Reference form

PT LLB Reference Form for Entry 2017

We would prefer at least one academic reference. If this is not possible, references from your current employer or someone who can vouch for the information on your application form will be required. Please note we cannot accept references from friends or family members.

Applicants are also required to submit copies of all qualifications (transcripts and award certificates) along with a £10 administration fee (cheque or postal order payable to University of Strathclyde).

Course delivery - 2017/18

We’re changing the way we deliver this part-time course. We’ve made this change in response to the needs of our students.

From 2017/18, daytime attendance is required for students commencing the LLB on a part-time basis. Evening classes will be available only for continuing students.

If you wish to defer entry beyond September 2016, you will not be able to take the first year as an evening degree. For more information please contact us.

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