BA Hons Education & Human Resource Management

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Key facts

  • UCAS Code: XN36
  • Start date: Sep 2020
  • Study abroad: opportunity to study in Europe & North America

  • Work placement: valuable industrial experience within an educational setting

  • Applicant visit day: March each year

Study with us

  • opportunity to put theory into practice in a community placement and enhance your employability
  • develop your knowledge and understanding of the education systems of Scotland and beyond
  • learn about recruitment and selection, training and developing, rewards, diversity and managing conflict at work
  • experience research-informed, evidence-based teaching by internationally-recognised professionals
  • opportunity to progress to a Professional Graduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) Primary/Secondary
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Why this course?

In this course, we offer you the chance to develop knowledge of the education systems of Scotland and beyond, looking at issues including policy, social justice, equity and inclusion.

Combining education with other subjects provides opportunities for those who wish to work in professions associated with education, but who don't wish necessarily to become teachers. Please note that this course doesn't allow you to qualify as a teacher, though joint honours Education graduates will be able to explore postgraduate routes into teaching careers (via the PGDE).

We also offer some of the best teaching in Human Resource Management (HRM) in both Scotland and the UK.

HRM is about the relationship between employers and employees and the ways in which people are managed in the workplace. This covers areas such as recruitment and selection, training and developing and managing conflict at work. These are an important part of the management process in all organisations.

Student sitting in lecture room with a notepad and pen.

What you’ll study

Education

Year 1

Education issues explored include the impact of poverty and social class on children and society, the role of culture and community in education, how people learn and the place of policy and politics in education. You'll undertake a placement with children between the ages of 0-14.

Year 2

In second year, you’ll look more closely at what education means and how people learn. You’ll study how children learn from before they are born to learning in later life. You’ll also learn about education beyond the classroom as well as having the opportunity to study an education-focused module of your choice

Year 3

This year, you will explore adult education with an opportunity to apply classroom knowledge within a community placement. You will also engage more deeply in educational research which will set you up for engaging in a research project in your final year.

Year 4

As a fourth-year student, you will have considerable choice in your study modules. For example, you can look at policy and politics in education in relation to broader social issues such as gender, race, disability, and poverty, or educational representations in film and literature.

Work placement

As part of the first year in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, all students choosing to study education must undertake a placement. This placement involves working with children between the ages of 0 to 14 for 70 hours across the course of the year and can be in a range of options other than a mainstream primary school setting.

Please read our important information about the Protecting Vulnerable Groups (PVG) Scheme. This is for all applicants applying for courses which involve placement opportunities (working with children or vulnerable adults).

Major projects

Students enjoy a wide range of professional development opportunities. These might be ones run by students or by organisations that are invited in to speak with students.

Currently, we have leading professional development opportunities like learning British Sign Language, anti-sectarian education, and working with children abroad.

You'll have the opportunity to lead some professional development for staff and students if you have a particular strength or expertise relevant to education. There are also extra-curricular education activities such as a philosophy café and film group.

Dissertation

Within the joint Honours in Education, you’ll be able to undertake a dissertation that allows you to do research in an area of particular interest to you.

Facilities

You'll have access to the Education Resources Centre. The Education Resources Centre is a library dedicated to education materials and is the best resource of its kind in the country.

Postgraduate study

By completing the BA joint Honours in Education, you'll be in a great position to apply for our  or Secondary Education (PGDE) courses. You might also be able to continue on to study for your Masters in Education with us here at Strathclyde.

Human Resource Management

Year 1

The introductory class – Managing People – provides an overview of HRM.

Years 2 & 3

Core classes cover more in-depth HRM theories and techniques. Year 2 focuses on workplace behaviour from an organisational psychology point of view. Year 3 focuses on more sociological theories. Options include classes in employee development and equality and diversity.

Year 4

You’ll study a range of specialist classes at single or joint Honours.

Study abroad

In year 3 you'll have the opportunity to study in Europe, North America and elsewhere for one or two semesters.

Student competitions

The Peter Bain Prize is awarded each year to the student with the highest mark for their dissertation.

The HRM Society

The HRM Society is run by our students for our students. It aims to bring together all year groups into one network where they can share knowledge and practice, awareness of careers and build relationships with alumni and employers.

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Learning & teaching

Education

You'll take part in workshops for practical aspects of the course, and have access to lab space and specialist teaching space for science and the expressive arts, including physical education. Field trips and the chance to study elective and optional classes are also available to students.

Throughout the degree programme, you'll be invited to lectures by guest speakers that are visiting the School of Education. They'll also be invited to lectures specifically for Education students. As part of the work on professional development, you'll have the opportunity to organise guest speakers from relevant organisations to speak with students. The School of Education aims to be responsive to the interests of its students as well as ensuring that they have access to leading educationists when they visit.

Human Resource Management

Teaching is given over two semesters in blocks of 12 weeks each. Methods include lectures, tutorials and seminars. As a student, you'll take part in team-based projects and make use of online teaching materials. Our industrial partners regularly assist in teaching and the assessment of student presentations.

Assessment

Education

In first year, you're supported in learning about academic reading, writing and referencing - skills that will help you become a successful undergraduate. Peer support encourages students to develop their own assessment skills and learn from each other. During the course, tutorials and presentations will be assessed and feedback will be provided before you submit work for formal assessment.

Human Resource Management

The majority of classes are assessed by a final, unseen, exam in addition to one or more forms of individual and/or group coursework. In some cases, you can earn an exemption from the exam by achieving a specified coursework mark. Exams are normally held at the end of the semester in which the class is taught.

You normally have one opportunity to be re-assessed for a failed class.

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Course content

Education

Understanding Education in the 21st Century

This class introduces students to a large and rich seam of disciplinary knowledge. It is an introductory class of potential interest to all who want to understand more about Education. Some of the key content to be addressed in the module is around the following:

  • the field of study that is education: what it is and how we know that
  • the context of education: some contribution of political, historical and economic dimensions to curriculum, schooling, policy, globalisation
  • education achievement: some contributions of psychological, sociological and philosophical perspectives to topics such as learning, diversity, gender
Placement & Curriculum

In this class, students from different disciplines work together to learn about children and the communities in which they live; children's health and wellbeing; child protection; children's voice; children's play and play places. The notion that the health and wellbeing of children and young people is central to the advancement of society is a seminal theme in this module. 

The placement experience has been designed to allow students to undertake a work placement with children and young people from 0 - 14 years. Placements will be provided in a range of settings outwith the mainstream classroom.

Human Resource Management

Managing People
In recent years the task of managing employees has been made more challenging by rapid changes in the business environment. This class focuses on the contemporary and practical issues of how people are organised and managed in the workplace and examines theoretical perspectives which help our understanding of the complex relationship between the employer and employee in facilitating the organisation and production of goods and services.

Education

Learners & Learning
This class provides students with an essential understanding of human learning processes and the needs of learners across the life-course.
Informal Education
This class investigates philosophical and pedagogical interventions beyond the school curriculum in informal settings, with adults in particular. It'll also open up possibilities for informal education techniques and practices to be considered and adopted by a range of professions and to explore potential partnerships between informal education specialists and others.

Human Resource Management

Work Psychology
This class develops understanding of managing people from a psychological perspective through understanding behaviour, attitudes, motivation and wellbeing of people at work. Areas covered include what leads to positive employee work attitudes like job satisfaction, organisational commitment, and their outcomes in terms of work behaviour, such as job performance, withdrawal, absenteeism, turnover, fair treatment and trust.
Work Psychology for Human Resource Management
This class looks at applying psychological theories explaining effectiveness and well-being of people at work to Human Resource Management as an approach to managing people and the employment relationships. Areas covered include organisational and individual decision-making relating to the recruitment and selection process, the impact of performance management on employee perceptions, team working, and the impact of leadership on attitudes and trust.

Education

History & Philosophy of Education

This class will support students in developing their knowledge and understanding of the roots of some key educational ideas in history. These will be considered from a philosophical perspective.

Children & Childhood

This class will focus on children and childhood in contexts other than formal education settings that will be explored elsewhere. It will introduce students to the concepts of child and childhood through a range representations and will draw on children in film, art and literature to explore representations of children and childhood and experiences of childhood.

Social Pedagogy with Adults

This class is based on an understanding of the evolution of adult learning and the resultant principles that underline current practice and will illustrate how adult educators work and will also open up possibilities for adult education techniques and practices to be considered. It'll also explore potential partnerships between adult educators and others.

Human Resource Management

Work, Employment & Society
This class critically explores changes in the nature of work, employment and society through investigating the extent to which current developments in the workplace can be seen to represent a fundamental shift in the nature of workplace regulation. It'll provide contrasting and complementary perspectives on workplace behaviour to those provided in year 2.
Employment Relations
You'll be introduced to the British system of employment relations, and the general principles, processes and outcomes. It'll consider different theoretical approaches to the study of employment and industrial relations and then examine the role and objectives of trade unions, employers and the state, and their interactions in collective bargaining, employee participation and industrial conflict.

Education

Dissertation

The Dissertation in Education is designed to further students’ development of a questioning, self-evaluative and reflective approach in a major in-depth piece of work demanding independent, self-motivated study and the sustained application of professional research and enquiry skills.

The widest possible range of topics, types of project, modes of enquiry and of research techniques is encouraged. What projects have in common is the individual student’s ownership and control of the project and the expectation of high quality work.

Choose from the following:

Policy & Politics in Education

This class will provide students with the opportunity to engage in debate about current issues in education through detailed exploration of the policy and political contexts. It will introduce students to frameworks for understanding how policy comes about and how it is inextricably linked with political issues.

Social Issues in Education

This class will teach students about the responsibility of teachers for the education, health and well-being of all children, in the context of a complex and diverse society. It will also address the needs of those who will work with children, young people and adults in a variety of education-related contexts through its focus on a range of key social issues and the relevant national legislative and policy framework.

Social Research Methods (10-credit class)

This class prepares students for designing and completing a research project. It will equip students with the skills and knowledge required in planning and delivering a research project.

Human Resource Management

Advanced Organisational Behaviour
This class draws on current themes in work and organisational psychology, and HRM understood from the perspective of micro-organisational behaviour theory and research. It's structured around the concepts of Reframing Organisations and, although the emphasis is on ‘micro’, or individual-level, approaches to organisational behaviour, ‘reframing’ takes into consideration more ‘macro’ or sociological and critical management approaches as well.
HRM & Employment Relations in Public Services

The aim of the module is to provide you with a critical understanding of the context and content of ‘New Public Management’ and alternative public management reform strategies. There's particular reference to impacts on HRM and employment relations.

The module will enable you to compare how different countries’ reform trajectories have impacted on changes in HRM and employment relations.

Human Resources in the Global Economy
This class looks at HRM within a broader understanding of globalization and the international political economy. It places current themes in an international and comparative perspective by analysing and comparing different national ‘models of management’, and a range of employee response to them and, amongst other things, asks questions about the ways in which these management practices are disseminated by multinational companies (MNCs).
Perspective on Work & Employment
This module builds on the year 3 class, Work, Employment and Society, and explores the contribution of social theory to understandings of the contemporary conditions of work and organisations.

Glasgow is Scotland's biggest & most cosmopolitan city

Our campus is based in the very heart of Glasgow, Scotland's largest city. National Geographic named Glasgow as one of its 'Best of the World' destinations, while Rough Guide readers have voted Glasgow the world’s friendliest city! And Time Out named Glasgow in the top ten best cities in the world - we couldn't agree more!

We're in the city centre, next to the Merchant City, both of which are great locations for sightseeing, shopping and socialising alongside your studies.

Find out what some of our students think about studying in Glasgow!

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Entry requirements

Required subjects are shown in brackets.

Highers

Standard entry requirements:

  • 1st sitting: AAAA
  • 2nd sitting: AAAABB

(Higher English, Maths/Applications of Mathematics National 5 B, or equivalent)

Minimum entry requirements*:

  • 1st sitting: AABB
  • 2nd sitting: AABBB

(Higher English B and Maths/Applications of Maths National 5 C)

*Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

A Levels

ABB-BBB

(GCSE English Language 6/B or Literature 6/B, GCSE Maths 4/C)

International Baccalaureate

36

(Maths SL5)

HNC

Social Sciences:

Year 1 entry: A in Graded Unit; Maths National 5 B, or equivalent

International students

Find out entry requirements for your country by visiting our country pages

Deferred Entry

Not normally accepted

Additional Information

Students are required to register with the Scottish Government’s Protecting Vulnerable Groups scheme.

Degree preparation course for international students

We offer international students (non-EU/UK) who do not meet the academic entry requirements for an undergraduate degree at Strathclyde the option of completing an Undergraduate Foundation year programme at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre.

Upon successful completion, you will be able to progress to this degree course at the University of Strathclyde.

Widening access

We want to increase opportunities for people from every background. Strathclyde selects our students based on merit, potential and the ability to benefit from the education we offer. We look for more than just your grades. We consider the circumstances of your education and will make lower offers to certain applicants as a result.

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

International students

We've a thriving international community with students coming here to study from over 100 countries across the world. Find out all you need to know about studying in Glasgow at Strathclyde and hear from students about their experiences.

Visit our international students' section

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Fees & funding

2020/21

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Scotland/EU

TBC

Fees for students domiciled in Scotland and the EU are subject to confirmation in early 2020 by the Scottish Funding Council.

(2019/20: £1,820)

Rest of UK

TBC

Assuming no change in RUK fees policy over the period, the total amount payable by undergraduate students will be capped. For students commencing study in 2020/21, this is capped at £27,750 (with the exception of the MPharm and integrated Masters programmes), MPharm students pay £9,250 for each of the four years. Students studying on integrated Masters degree programmes pay an additional £9,250 for the Masters year with the exception of those undertaking a full-year industrial placement where a separate placement fee will apply.

(2019/20: £9,250)

International

£15,300

University preparation programme fees

International students can find out more about the costs and payments of studying a university preparation programme at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre.

Additional costs

Course materials & Costs

Students are encouraged to purchase the core textbook for each HRM module but copies are also available in the University library. (Approximate cost £40-50 per textbook)

Other costs

Students are responsible for costs of printing and binding of final project (approx £50).

Available scholarships

Take a look at our scholarships search for funding opportunities.

Please note: All fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my studies?

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Students from Scotland and the EU

If you're a Scottish or EU student, you may be able to apply to the Student Award Agency Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government. Scottish students may also be eligible for a bursary and loan to help cover living costs while at University.

For more information on funding your studies have a look at our University Funding page.

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Students from England, Wales & Northern Ireland

We have a generous package of bursaries on offer for students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales:

You don’t need to make a separate application for these. When your place is confirmed at Strathclyde, we’ll assess your eligibility. Have a look at our scholarship search for any more funding opportunities.

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International Students (Non-UKScholarships, EEA)

We have a number of scholarships available to international students. Take a look at our scholarship search to find out more.

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Education & Human Resource Management

Qualification: BA

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Contact us

Undergraduate Selection

Telephone: +44 (0)141 444 8600

Email: hass-ug-selectors@strath.ac.uk