BA Hons Education & Spanish

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Key facts

  • UCAS Code: RX43
  • Study mode and duration: full-time, part-time available
  • International experience: exchange partnerships with Valencia, Zaragoza and Alicante

  • Applicant visit day: March each year

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Our BA (Hons) Humanities & Social Sciences degree, explained.

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Why this course?

With more than 500 million native speakers, Spanish is the second most commonly spoken language in the world. Speaking Spanish will help you conduct business more confidently in countries that are becoming increasingly important in world markets. 

Studying with us will give you the chance to become a fluent linguist and, with our year abroad programme, an opportunity to experience living, working and/or studying in another country.

Education is essential if you wish to study initial teacher education courses. We offer you the chance to develop knowledge of the education systems of Scotland and beyond, looking at issues including policy, social justice, equity and inclusion. You'll have the opportunity to put theory into practice in a community placement and enhance your employability.

Combining education with other subjects provides opportunities for those who wish to work in professions associated with education, but who don't wish necessarily to become teachers. Studying this course, you'll experience research-informed, evidence-based teaching by internationally recognised professionals.

Please note that this course doesn't allow you to qualify as a teacher, though joint honours Education graduates will be able to explore postgraduate routes into teaching careers (via the Professional Graduate Diploma in Education).

Our BA degrees in Humanities & Social Sciences are initially broad-based. In Year 1, you'll study three subjects, including your chosen subjects.

 

THE Awards 2019: UK University of the Year Winner

What you’ll study

Spanish

In every year, teaching focuses heavily on language work, but you'll also discover the culture of Spain and Spanish-speaking countries.

Year 1

Two streams are offered in first-year: one for students with Higher Spanish or equivalent qualification in their chosen language and another for those without. Students in both classes study contemporary Spanish language and aspects of the country’s culture and society.

Year 2 & 3

You'll continue to develop your reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. In the cultural class each year, you'll learn more about the history, politics, literature, and cinema of Spain and Spanish-speaking countries.

Year abroad

Honours students spend a year abroad after Year 3, usually working as an English teaching assistant, gaining experience on a work placement or studying at a foreign institution. 

This is a central highlight of the course and a major formative experience for students not just in terms of language, but on many different levels, personal as well as professional.

Year 4

In your final year, you'll concentrate on translation, written and oral language and interpreting. You'll also have the chance to write a dissertation in Spanish. If however, you choose to write your dissertation for your other Honours subjects, you'll take two of our cultural classes. These classes reflect the research expertise of our staff and include Latin America through Indigenous Eyes, Visual Culture in Spain, and Key Theories and Debates of Translation Studies (Spanish).

Major projects

At Honours level, you'll work on a specific project for your dissertation. You'll be supervised by a member of our teaching staff.

Student competitions

The Stevenson Exchange Scholarship is a competitive award which offers students funding towards a project they wish to undertake while on their year abroad. Staff select and interview several candidates for this each year.

Education

Year 1

Education issues explored include the impact of poverty and social class on children and society, the role of culture and community in education, how people learn and the place of policy and politics in education. You'll undertake a placement with children between the ages of 0 to 14.

Year 2

In second year, you’ll look more closely at what education means and how people learn. You’ll study how children learn from before they are born to learning in later life. You’ll also learn about education beyond the classroom as well as having the opportunity to study an education-focused module of your choice.

Year 3

This year, you will explore adult education with an opportunity to apply classroom knowledge within a community placement. You will also engage more deeply in educational research which will set you up for engaging in a research project in your final year

Year 4

As a fourth-year student, you will have considerable choice in your study modules. For example, you can look at policy and politics in education in relation to broader social issues such as gender, race, disability, and poverty, or educational representations in film and literature.

Work placement

As part of the first year in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences, all students choosing to study education must undertake a placement. This placement involves working with children between the ages of 0-14 for 70 hours across the course of the year. The placement can be in a range of options other than a mainstream primary school setting.

Please note that you may be required to join the Protecting Vulnerable Groups (PVG) Scheme. This is for all applicants applying for courses which involve placement opportunities (working with children or vulnerable adults). The cost of the PVG scheme will depend on the related work you apply to, please check the fees and funding section for costs.

Major projects

Students enjoy a wide range of professional development opportunities. These might be ones run by students or by organisations that are invited in to speak with students. There are currently leading professional development opportunities in the likes of British Sign Language, anti-sectarian education and working with children abroad. Students will have the opportunity to lead some professional development for staff and students if they have a particular strength or expertise relevant to education. There are extra-curricular education activities such as a philosophy café and film group.

Within the joint honours in Education, you’ll be able to undertake a dissertation that allows you to do research in an area of particular interest to you.

Facilities

Education students have access to the Education Resources Centre. This is a library dedicated to education materials.  It is the best resource of its kind in the country.

Postgraduate study

Students completing the BA joint honours in Education will be well-placed to apply for PGDE primary or secondary courses.  They will also be able to continue onto the Strathclyde MEd.

Course awards

The University of Strathclyde is the only university in Scotland to offer a joint honours Education degree.

Single & joint Honours information

English, English and Creative Writing, History, Politics and International Relations and Psychology may be studied to Single or Joint Honours level.

Education, French, Spanish, Law, Journalism, Media and Communication and Social Policy are available only as Joint Honours Programmes. Economics, Human Resource Management, Marketing, Mathematics and Tourism can also be studied alongside a Humanities and Social Sciences subject.

The available subject combinations may change each year. Once accepted on the programme you'll be allocated an advisor of studies who will be able to let you know which subjects can be combined, in first year, and beyond.

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Course content

Spanish

Spanish 1A

This course will further your knowledge of the Spanish language and develop the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in the Spanish language through intensive practical and communicative language work. This course aims to bring you up to level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. You'll extend your knowledge of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world and focus on the development of contemporary Latin America and on how issues relating to it are reflected in its cultural production (for example, films, journalism, songs).

Spanish 1B

Following on from Spanish 1A, this course will broaden your knowledge of the Spanish language, and enhance basic skills already acquired in reading, writing, listening and speaking. This course aims to bring you up to level A2+ of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. It'll also introduce you to new aspects of the culture of Spain through the materials used. Practical language activities, such as pair and small group work and intensive exposure to Spanish through audio, video and written texts, will enable you to progress from the levels achieved in Spanish 1A. Successful completion of this class will enable students to take Spanish 2A in semester 1 of second year.

or

Introduction to Spanish 1A

This course aims to give an introduction to the Spanish language, assuming limited or no previous knowledge of Spanish. It introduces everyday Spanish language, as well as certain aspects of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. The class is intended to help students to develop the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in basic Spanish.

Introduction to Spanish 1B

This course builds on and develops the knowledge acquired in Introduction to Spanish 1A. The class will broaden your knowledge of Spanish language and enhance skills already acquired of reading, writing, listening and speaking in basic Spanish. This class also introduces students to new aspects of the culture of the Spanish-speaking world.

Education

Understanding Education in the 21st Century

This class introduces students to a large and rich seam of disciplinary knowledge. It is an introductory class of potential interest to all who want to understand more about Education. Some of the key content to be addressed in the module is around the following:

  • the field of study that is education: what it is and how we know that
  • the context of education: some contribution of political, historical and economic dimensions to curriculum, schooling, policy, globalisation
  • education achievement: some contributions of psychological, sociological and philosophical perspectives to topics such as learning, diversity, gender

Placement & Curriculum

On this module, students from across disciplines work together to learn about children and the communities in which they live; children's health and wellbeing; child protection; children's voice; children's play and play places. The notion that the health and wellbeing of children and young people is central to the advancement of society is a seminal theme in this module. 

The placement experience has been designed to allow students to undertake a work placement with children and young people from 0 - 14 years.  Placements will be provided in a range of settings outwith the mainstream classroom.

Spanish

Spanish 2A

This course will introduce you to more complex and formal areas of language, and enable you to develop further the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in the Spanish language. It'll also introduce you to certain aspects of the different cultures of Spain and Latin America through the materials used. Practical language activities such as pair and small group work and intensive exposure to the Spanish language through audio, video and written texts will build on what you already know, and give you a feel for the Spanish language as it is used in professional contexts. This course aims to bring you up to level A2+/B1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Spanish 2B

This course builds on and develops the knowledge acquired in Spanish 2A and will introduce you to yet more complex and formal areas of language, improving and developing further the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in the Spanish language. It'll also introduce you to certain aspects of the culture of Spain and Latin America through the materials used. Practical language activities such as pair and small group work and intensive exposure to the Spanish language through audio, video and written texts will build on what you already know, and give you a feel for the Spanish language as it is used in professional contexts. Successful completion of this class will enable students to take Spanish at third-year level. This course aims to bring you up to level B1+ of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Spanish & Latin American Studies II

This course will explore the interlinked themes of independence and isolation in Spain and Latin America. The class is intended to give students a broad overview of Spanish and Latin American social, political and cultural history through the examination of specific texts and films, as well as to develop their critical and research skills.

Education

Culture, Society, Formation

The purpose of Culture, Society, Formation is to introduce students to a sample of foundational texts which have informed and transformed our understanding of culture and society, and to consider the impact that these understandings have had and continue to have on education.

Education & Learning

The overall purpose of this class is to develop your understanding of educational thought and language. Because this class is not organised around a given profession (e.g. teaching in schools) the discussion of education will be quite general and applies to any educational context, from parenting, to school, to college, to lifelong learning and informal education. ‘Education and Learning’ addresses questions that are at the heart of understanding what education is and what learning is. That these terms denote different things is an important starting point.

Spanish

Spanish 3A

This course builds on and develops the knowledge acquired in Spanish 2B and will consolidate the students’ knowledge and use of the Spanish language within an appropriate cultural context in order to enable the student to live, study and work in a Spanish-speaking country. This course aims to bring you up to level B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Spanish 3B

This course aims to build on and develop the knowledge acquired in Spanish 3A and will focus on two relevant topics which includes the preparation for the year abroad. This course aims to bring you up to level B2+ of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. In addition to the final exam, a comprehensive project will comprise the other 50% of your final mark for this course. This project will enable you to put into practice and further develop the linguistic skills and cultural knowledge you have developed since you started studying Spanish at Strathclyde.

Spanish & Latin American Studies III

This course builds on and develops the knowledge acquired in Independence and isolation in Spain and Latin America - Hispanic Studies 2 (R4200), and adds a dimension of critical and theoretical awareness, as well as developing critical skills through a study of individual texts and films from Spain and different countries of Latin America, to build an understanding of the history and cultures in which they were produced.

Education

Educational Encounters Past & Present

Who are you, and what do you think about education, and why? Despite everybody being somehow involved in education, those important questions are rarely asked and reflected upon. The best way to engage with such problems is the encounter with the Other in either historical or intercultural perspective. Using a set of questions around fundamental pedagogical notions and concepts (such as ‘educator’, ‘student’, ‘pedagogical relationship’, ‘curriculum’, ‘pedagogical ethics’, ‘Education Studies’, etc.) the module will explore different answers to those questions that either have been given in our own culture in the past, or in other cultures in the past or today (for example, in East/ South East/ South Asia, in the Arabic world, in African societies, in South America, and amongst indigenous tribes and peoples around the globe).

Fundamental problems explored could include:

  • what is education perceived to be?
  • what is the educator understood to be, what is the student, and how is their pedagogical relationship established, organised, and justified?
  • what is/are the purpose/s of education, and how does it/do they get justified?
  • what is the relation between individual and social needs and desires within education?
  • what ways of educating are preferred, and why?
  • how is the reflection on education (i.e. Education Studies) codified and institutionalised; who is reflecting and what counts as an acceptable form of reflection, and why?

Everyone who is interested in looking beyond their own educational horizon to learn about others and oneself is very welcome on this educational journey.

History and Philosophy of Education

This module will support students in developing their knowledge and understanding of the roots of some key educational ideas in history. These will be considered from a philosophical perspective.

Children & Childhood

This module will focus on children and childhood in contexts other than formal education settings that will be explored elsewhere. The aim of this module is to introduce students to the concepts of child and childhood through a range of representations. The class will draw on children in film, art and literature to explore representations of children and childhood and experiences of childhood.

Social Pedagogy with Adults

This module is based on an understanding of the evolution of adult learning and the resultant principles that underline current practice and will illustrate how adult educators work and will also open up possibilities for adult education techniques and practices to be considered. It'll also explore potential partnerships between adult educators and others.

Year abroad

This is the year abroad, spent either studying in a foreign university or working as a language assistant or on a work placement. This year is compulsory to gain entry into Honours.

Spanish

Compulsory classes

Spanish Honours Spoken Language

This class fits into the distinctive nature of the Strathclyde languages degree, whereby emphasis is given to the acquisition and deployment of practical language skills. This is an advanced language class specifically designed to bring students' presentation skills in Spanish to a professional level and to introduce them to the demanding task of liaison interpreting in a variety of contexts.

Spanish Honours Spoken Language

This class fits into the distinctive nature of the Strathclyde languages degree, whereby emphasis is given to the acquisition and deployment of practical language skills. This is an advanced language class specifically designed to bring students' presentation skills in Spanish to a professional level and to introduce them to the demanding task of liaison interpreting in a variety of contexts.

Elective classes

Latin America Through Indigenous Eyes

This class aims to provide an alternative vision of Latin America from Indigenous perspectives, through the medium of film and stories. Students will first be introduced to the broad cultural and linguistic diversity of Latin America, before focusing on the Inca, Maya and Aztec cultural spheres.

The class will discuss both historical and contemporary material, identifying changes and continuities between the ancient civilizations and their contemporary descendants.

Students will learn about Indigenous worldviews, conceptions of nature and the wider cosmos, and how Indigenous societies have adapted to profound social and political changes since the Conquest.

What are you looking!?: Visual Culture in Spain

This one-semester class aims to provide a nuanced, diverse, representative and updated perspective on a range of the core issues that are vital for an understanding of Spain and its recent past in order to unlock a window into its present.

The class offers a unique combination of media and genres across a heterogeneous set of perspectives often excluded from the more Eurocentric/hegemonic and heteronormative portrayals of Spain that are standard in UK programmes.

All material is available in Spanish (with much also in English); nevertheless, students will also enjoy exposure to several other languages and identities present in Spain, which will broaden their awareness of cultural and linguistic diversity and the complexities involved in intercultural communication.

Key Theories and Debates of Translation Studies (Spanish)

This one-semester class is designed to further develop students’ linguistic skills and cultural awareness in the context of translation, introducing students to the key debates in the study of translation.

It will also equip students to critically engage with a variety of texts in order to address questions such as:

  • what constitutes a 'good' translation?
  • what is the role of the translator?
  • what is the interrelationship between source-text, target-text, author and readership? And how does the interrelationship between these elements affect translation decisions?
  • how do you account for cultural differences? And gender?
  • what is an annotated translation?

Class content will cover the translation of texts from advertising, business, and corporate texts, machine translation, to feminism, audio-visual translation, and political texts.

Student Placement

This module offers Honours students the opportunity to spend a minimum of 60 hours and up to 100 hours on a placement of their choice where their knowledge of Spanish language and Latin American cultures as well as their set of skills can be applied; placements can range from teaching, translating, interpreting to tour guiding, doing research, etc. This module aims to apply your language skills to real-life experiences and allows you to become more acquainted with industry-level expectations.

Education

Compulsory classes

Educational Representation in Film & Literature

Educational Representations in Film and Literature provides you with opportunities to reflect on educational questions through popular literary and visual media. The opportunity to interpret and reflect upon education in the context of popular culture allows you to examine theories in practice, albeit fictional contexts of practice. As well as the representations of education, the literature regularly embodies the pedagogical intentions of the author, intentions which will be explored in the module. These and other considerations form the structure and content of this module.

Dissertation

The Dissertation in Education is designed to further your development of a questioning, self-evaluative and reflective approach in a major in-depth piece of work demanding independent, self-motivated study and the sustained application of professional research and enquiry skills. The widest possible range of topics, types of project, modes of enquiry and of research techniques is encouraged. What projects have in common is the individual student’s ownership and control of the project and the expectation of high quality work.

Elective classes

Choose from this list

Policy and Politics in Education

This class will provide students with the opportunity to engage in debate about current issues in education through detailed exploration of the policy and political contexts. It will introduce students to frameworks for understanding how policy comes about and how it is inextricably linked with political issues.

Social Issues in Education

This module will teach students about the responsibility of teachers for the education, health and well-being of all children, in the context of a complex and diverse society.  It will also address the needs of those who will work with children, young people and adults in a variety of education-related contexts through its focus on a range of key social issues and the relevant national legislative and policy framework.

Social Research Methods

This class prepares you for designing and completing a research project. It will equip you with the skills and knowledge required in planning and delivering a research project.

Second Language Learning

This module introduces students to how individuals learn a second/foreign language across the lifespan. Students will explore the process of acquisition, models of learning, and policies and political contexts that motivate language learning. This module covers language learning in both a Scottish and global context, with specific attention to the global spread of English.

Explorations in Educational Influence

Influences are everywhere. Parents try to influence children, and children try to influence parents. Friends sometimes try to influence each other. Teachers try to influence students, advertisers hope to influence consumers, politicians wish to represent, but also to influence, the public. In this 10-credit module, we will explore certain problems around educational influence. The module is structured around three main questions: what educational influence means, to what extent it is justified, and how it is achieved. The module will explore examples of educational influence drawn from one or more of the following contexts: morality; politics; religion; sexual orientation; psychology; environmentalism; art and aesthetics; technology and social media.

Creativity in Education

The ability to be creative is highly valued across society, and has at times been described as one of the key ‘21st Century skills’ in education. Well beyond their school days, learners are going to find situations where they need to use their imagination, and come up with ideas. Businesses need to find creative ways to thrive and serve their customers, teachers need to be creative when designing lesson plans, and citizens need to find creative solutions to their problems. This module will explore the psychology behind creativity, and tackle misconceptions such as the idea that it is the province of only certain fields, or that some people are creative and others are not. It will also provide a toolkit to help participants to develop their own creative strategies.

Learning & teaching

Spanish

We focus on the four important language skills:

  • reading
  • writing
  • speaking
  • listening

We make great use of technology in the classroom – interactive lectures and digital language laboratories – and outside, through the use of web-based learning and streamed Spanish television.

In later years you will perform presentations, write reports and interpret into English, which prepares you for potential future careers.

Education

You will take part in workshops for practical aspects of the course, and have access to lab space and specialist teaching space for science and the expressive arts, including physical education. Field trips and the chance to study elective and optional classes are also available to students.

Throughout the degree programme, students will be invited to lectures by guest speakers that are visiting The Strathclyde Institute of Education. They'll also be invited to lectures specifically for Education students. As part of the work on professional development, students will have the opportunity to organise guest speakers from relevant organisations to speak with students. The Strathclyde Institute of Education aims to be responsive to the interests of its students as well as ensuring that they have access to leading educationists when they visit.

Assessment

Spanish

Our assessment methods include:

  • written examinations, including translations
  • writing for a specific purpose
  • essays

Continuous assessment ranges from online grammar tests to group projects, while oral/aural tests are performed throughout the course. Students write a dissertation in their final year.

Education

In first year, students are supported in learning about academic reading, writing and referencing - skills that will help you become a successful undergraduate. Through peer support, we encourage students to develop their own assessment skills and learn from each other. During the course, tutorials and presentations are assessed and feedback provided before students submit work for formal assessment.

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Entry requirements

Required subjects are shown in brackets.

Highers

Standard entry requirements*:

  • 1st sitting: AAAA 
  • 2nd sitting: AAAAB 

(including English plus at least one other social science subject from those listed under preferred subjects below; plus National 5 Maths or Application of Maths at B to C.)

 

Minimum entry requirements**:

  • 1st sitting: AABB 
  • 2nd sitting: AABBB 

(including English at B plus at least one other social science subject from those listed under preferred subjects below; plus National 5 Maths or Application of Maths at C.)

Preferred subjects

  • Classical Studies
  • Drama
  • Economics
  • Gaelic
  • Geography
  • History
  • Modern Studies
  • Modern Language (German/French/Spanish/Italian)
  • Philosophy
  • Politics
  • Psychology
  • Religious, Moral and Philosophical Studies
  • Sociology
A Levels

ABB-BBB

International Baccalaureate

32-30

Irish Leaving Certificate

 

Two H2 passes and three H3 passes including English

 

HNC

Year 1 entry: Social Sciences A in Graded Unit; Maths National 5 B, or equivalent

International students

View the entry requirements for your country.

Deferred entry

Not normally accepted

*Standard entry requirements

Offers are made in accordance with specified entry requirements although admission to undergraduate programmes is considered on a competitive basis and entry requirements stated are normally the minimum level required for entry.

Whilst offers are made primarily on the basis of an applicant meeting or exceeding the stated entry criteria, admission to the University is granted on the basis of merit, and the potential to succeed. As such, a range of information is considered in determining suitability.

In exceptional cases, where an applicant does not meet the competitive entry standard, evidence may be sought in the personal statement or reference to account for performance which was affected by exceptional circumstances, and which in the view of the judgement of the selector would give confidence that the applicant is capable of completing the programme of study successfully.

**Minimum entry requirements

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

Contextual Admissions for Widening Access

We want to increase opportunities for people from every background.

Strathclyde selects our students based on merit, potential, and the ability to benefit from the education we offer. We look for more than just your grades. We consider the circumstances of your education and will make lower offers to certain applicants as a result.

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

Placements

Every one of our flexible BA options gives students the chance to gain valuable industry experience as part of a credit-bearing work placement class in their third or fourth year.
 
Learn about placements

University preparation programme for international students

We offer international students (non-UK/Ireland) who do not meet the academic entry requirements for an undergraduate degree at Strathclyde the option of completing an Undergraduate Foundation Programme in Business and Social Sciences at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre. ​

Upon successful completion, you can progress to your chosen degree at the University of Strathclyde.

International students

We've a thriving international community with students coming here to study from over 140 countries across the world. Find out all you need to know about studying in Glasgow at Strathclyde and hear from students about their experiences.

Visit our international students' section

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Fees & funding

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Fees may be subject to updates to maintain accuracy. Tuition fees will be notified in your offer letter.

All fees are in £ sterling, unless otherwise stated, and may be subject to revision.

Annual revision of fees

Students on programmes of study of more than one year (or studying standalone modules) should be aware that tuition fees are revised annually and may increase in subsequent years of study. Annual increases will generally reflect UK inflation rates and increases to programme delivery costs.

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Scotland

£1,820

Fees for students who meet the relevant residence requirements in Scotland are subject to confirmation by the Scottish Funding Council. Scottish undergraduate students undertaking an exchange for a semester/year will continue to pay their normal tuition fees at Strathclyde and will not be charged fees by the overseas institution.

England, Wales & Northern Ireland

£9,250

Assuming no change in fees policy over the period, the total amount payable by undergraduate students will be capped. For students commencing study in 2024/25, this is capped at £27,750 (with the exception of the MPharm and integrated Masters programmes), MPharm students pay £9,250 for each of the four years. Students studying on integrated Masters degree programmes pay an additional £9,250 for the Masters year with the exception of those undertaking a full-year industrial placement where a separate placement fee will apply.

International

£19,600

University preparation programme fees

International students can find out more about the costs and payments of studying a university preparation programme at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre.

Additional costs

International students

International students may have associated visa and immigration costs. Please see student visa guidance for more information.

Education

Protection of Vulnerable Groups (PVG) scheme

Students must pay for the PVG Scheme. Students who require a new PVG certificate will pay £59. If you have an existing PVG and need to add Strathclyde, the cost is £18.

Spanish

Course materials & costs

The majority of course materials are available to students via Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).  Students can print course materials at their own expense.   

The cost of course texts does not normally exceed £30 per academic year. Key language texts are used over 2 or 3 years of study. Multiple copies are also available in the University Library.  

Study abroad 

Studying abroad is an integral part of the degree course in Modern Languages - and usually takes place in Year 4. Students who choose to study in France or Spain are eligible for an Erasmus and grant to help minimise the extra costs of living abroad. This, however, is not a full maintenance grant.  

Typically, students will receive around £3,000 for a full academic year of study abroad. Students are required to meet travel, accommodation and extra living costs. These costs will vary dependent on the country of study. An estimated extra spend of £1,000 should be budgeted.

A range of scholarships are available for students of Modern Languages and awarded on a competitive basis. 

Students who work as English language assistants will receive a monthly stipend. In the case of France, this amounts approximately to €964.88 per month gross (€800 net after social security deductions). Similar stipends are paid in Spain. 

Available scholarships

Take a look at our scholarships search for funding opportunities.

Please note: All fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my studies?

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Students from Scotland

Fees for students who meet the relevant residence requirements in Scotland, you may be able to apply to the Student Award Agency Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government. Scottish students may also be eligible for a bursary and loan to help cover living costs while at University.

For more information on funding your studies have a look at our University Funding page.

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Students from England, Wales & Northern Ireland

We have a generous package of bursaries on offer for students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales:

You don’t need to make a separate application for these. When your place is confirmed at Strathclyde, we’ll assess your eligibility. Have a look at our scholarship search for any more funding opportunities.

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International Students

We have a number of scholarships available to international students. Take a look at our scholarship search to find out more.

Dean's International Excellence Award

This scholarship is for new international students who will begin a full-time undergraduate course in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in September 2024. The award is a £5,000 scholarship per year for the duration of their degree (total of £20,000 for a four year course). All offer-holders are eligible for this scholarship.

Dean's International Excellence Award

Two students in library.

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Careers

Modern language graduates are in high demand across a range of areas. Some language graduates become teachers or translators, while others work in multilingual or international environments. Many of our students now work in journalism and broadcasting.

Many graduates earn employment in areas associated with education, such as law, psychology, the Civil Service and journalism. A joint Honours degree in Education and another subject enables graduates to apply for the Professional Graduate Diploma in Education, in either primary or secondary education.

Chat to a student ambassador

If you want to know more about what it’s like to be a Humanities & Social Sciences student at the University of Strathclyde, a selection of our current students are here to help!

Our Unibuddy ambassadors can answer all the questions you might have about courses and studying at Strathclyde, along with offering insight into their experiences of life in Glasgow and Scotland.

Chat to a student ambassador
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Apply

Please note that you only need to apply once for our BA degree programme.

For instance, if you have applied for BA Honours English and are considering your options for a Joint Honours degree, e.g. a BA Joint Honours in English and French you only need to apply for one or the other on UCAS.

If accepted on to the BA programme, you can study one of the many available subject combinations.

Start date:

Education & Spanish (1 year entry)

Start date: Sep 2024

Education & Spanish (1 year entry)

full-time
Start date: Sep 2024

UCAS Applications

Apply through UCAS if you are a UK applicant. International applicants may apply through UCAS if they are applying to more than one UK University.

Apply now

Direct Applications

Our Direct applications service is for international applicants who wish to apply to Strathclyde University at this time.

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Glasgow is Scotland's biggest & most cosmopolitan city

Our campus is based right in the very heart of Glasgow. We're in the city centre, next to the Merchant City, both of which are great locations for sightseeing, shopping and socialising alongside your studies.

Life in Glasgow

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Contact us

Prospective student enquiries

Telephone: +44 (0) 141 444 8600

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Discover Uni includes official statistics about higher education courses taken from national surveys and data collected from universities and colleges about all their students.

The Flexible BA

With our BA (Honours) degree, you can choose from subjects in Humanities, Social Sciences and Business, with two of your three subject choices taught by the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

The BA degree is a four-year course allowing you try new subjects, develop your own ideas, build a broad range of knowledge and enhance your employability.

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Subject combinations

Use our subject picker tool to see the combinations available to you in Year 1 of the BA Humanities & Social Sciences degree. Please note that in Year 2 you'll continue with two of these subjects.

Explore the structure of the BA Humanities & Social Sciences degree for detailed information on Single and Joint Honours options.