View of the vineyards in Gevrey Chambertin, France

BAFrench & Marketing

Why this course?

French is a major international language. It is the first language of more than 100 million people across the world, while more than 60 million people speak French as a second language.

Studying with us will give you the chance to become a fluent linguist and, with our year abroad programme, an opportunity to experience living, working and/or studying in another country.

Recognising and understanding customer requirements and the achievement of customer satisfaction are at the heart of Marketing studies.

Our department is widely recognised as one of the leading centres of marketing education and research in the UK. We aim to equip you for a variety of marketing and management careers.

Our BA degrees in Humanities & Social Sciences are initially broad-based. In Year 1 you will study three subjects, including your chosen subject(s).

French

What you'll study

Year 1

Two streams are offered in first-year: one for students with Higher French or an equivalent qualification and another for those without. Students in both classes study contemporary French language and aspects of the country’s culture and society.

Years 2 & 3

You’ll continue to develop your reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. In cultural classes, you’ll learn more about the history and politics of France and French-speaking countries through literature and film.

Year 4

In your final year, you’ll concentrate on translation, written and oral language and interpreting. Cultural classes – reflecting the research expertise of our staff – are currently offered in areas such as the occupation and how it is reflected in film.

Major projects

In your final year, you’ll build on your project work from previous years and write a dissertation. 

Year abroad

This is a central highlight of the course and a major formative experience for students not just in terms of language but on many different levels, personal as well as professional.

Student competitions

The Stevenson Exchange Scholarship is a competitive award which offers students funding towards a project they wish to undertake while on their year abroad. Staff select and interview several candidates for this each year. Our students usually do well in this competition; in 2013, one student secured £1,800 toward his project, and in 2014 three students were successful with awards up to £1,750.

In third year, students of French 3b - along with those in Italian and Spanish 3b - undertake a semester-long project. Students research a topic of their choice linked to French culture and produce a 20-minute presentation, a reflective report and a poster. The posters are displayed at an exhibition for two weeks in April and the student who designs the best poster in each language will receive a prize.

Marketing

What you'll study

Year 1

The first-year introductory class focuses on the broad principles of marketing and considers marketing management within an organisation.

Year 2

You will study classes on Consumer Behaviour, which looks at factors that influence buyers, and Marketing Research, which explores how information about customers and competitors influences Marketing decisions.

Year 3

You'll learn the fundamentals of both traditional and digital marketing communication along with gaining an understanding formulating a strategic marketing plan.

Year 4

Final-year students will assess the value of brands to firms and consumers in the Brand Management class. Further Year 4 class options include:

  • Social Marketing
  • Advances in Consumer Behaviour
  • Managing Customer Relationships
  • International Business Management
  • Managing Integrated Marketing Communications: Theory & Practice
  • Sports Marketing
  • Small Business Marketing
  • Tourism Marketing

Course content

Year 1

French

Year 1

Students take two combined classes: French 1A (semester 1), French 1B (semester 2). These courses are mainly organised around a linguistic progression towards level B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. There is a regular input of cultural background which takes the form of three lectures in semester 1 and two in semester 2 covering the following topics:

    • The Making of Modern France
    • France in a Global Context
    • Understanding the French Republic
    • French Identities
    • Contemporary French Society 

In addition, there is an introductory lecture in semester 2 entitled ‘What is translation about?’

Marketing

Introduction to Marketing

Marketing is a key part of any successful business, and a good theoretical and practical knowledge of the subject will be of immense benefit to an aspiring manager or entrepreneur. In this class, you'll be exposed to concepts and ideas from economics, sociology, psychology, geography and other social sciences, all in the context of the competitive business environment.

Year 2

French

Students take two language classes as in Year 1. The language courses are based on a series of classes.

Le Monde du Travail

Cultural focus: time (35 hour week, RTT and ‘ponts’, paternity/maternity leave, …) & ‘human resources’ (hierarchical organisation, discrimination, unions, relocation,…)

Linguistic focus: the negation, asking questions, using pronouns.

La France et L'Europe

Cultural focus: the origins of the European ideal, Europe and the EU viewed from France.

Linguistic focus: subjunctive mood.

Immigration & Nationalité

Cultural focus: a historical view of immigration in France and a look at the specificity of the French ‘integration’ system.

Linguistic focus: the system of tenses in French (concentrating on past tenses).

Les Femmes en Politique

Cultural focus: a further look (after first year) at French politics, concentrating on topical issues.

Linguistic focus: modal verbs.

Les Régions

Cultural focus: decentralisation, importance of regions in France.

Linguistic focus: the passive voice.

L’Économie

Cultural focus: the French economy (role of the state, …), marketing à la française

Linguistic focus: equivalent of –ing in French.

In addition, students specialising in French take the French Culture and History 2 class. This class focuses on the Occupation and French Colonialism/Decolonisation. The historical context for each topic is first set, and documents from the two periods studied, before discussion moves on to the cultural domain, via analysis of the following texts and films:

  • Au Revoir les Enfants (film, Malle)
  • Stupeur et Tremblements (text, Nothomb)
  • L'Étranger (text, Camus)
  • Le Samourai (film, Melville)
  • Anthology of historical texts relating to the Second World War
  • Anthology of historical texts relating to French Colonialism/Immigration

Marketing

Understanding Consumers & Markets

Many of the fundamental concepts of marketing are based on an ability to understand consumers and the marketing concept can be implemented more effectively when adequate information about the market and potential consumer behaviour is available. Marketing Research and customer information provide a critical input to the planning and development of a company's marketing strategy in relation to marketing communications, strategic marketing and branding.

Services & Retail Marketing

At the heart of this class is the recognition that services present unique challenges, and that building customer relationships through quality service is fundamental to marketing success in every organisation. Over the past decade the retail sector has been one of the most dynamic areas in business. The retail sector also provides a very clear indication of the overall health and robustness of the economy. The rise or fall of the individual’s disposable income is very quickly reflected in terms of expenditure on items. In this respect, the retail sector acts as the weather vane for the economy.

Year 3

French

Students take two language classes (as in previous years).

L’Esclavage Moderne

Cultural focus: a historical review of slavery and a look at modern forms of slavery.

Linguistic focus: reinforcement work on subjunctive mood, passive voice and negative forms.

Les Nouvelles Façons de Consommer

Cultural focus: the impact of consumerism on the environment.

Linguistic focus: adjectives and comparative, hypothesis, conditional mood.

Le Système Éducatif

Cultural focus: a look at current issues in the French education system.

Linguistic focus: reported speech, imperative mood, a further look at pronouns.

L’Année à l’Étranger

Cultural focus: practical module aiming at preparing students for the year abroad.

There is also a French Studies 3 class: Freedom and Identity in France and the Francophone world. This class is based on the study of the following texts and films as examples of the treatment of the class’s twin themes:

  • Milou en mai (film, Malle)
  • Poverty (various texts)
  • The Dreyfus Affair (various historical texts)
  • Monsieur Klein (film, Losey)
  • Rue des Boutiques Obscures (text, Modiano)
  • National Identity in the Third Republic (various historical texts)

Marketing

Strategic Marketing in an International Context

This core class addresses the strategy formulation and planning aspects associated with strategic marketing management as it is applied in domestic and international contexts. The class offers students an analytic decision oriented approach for the development and implementation of international marketing strategy.

Marketing Communications in the Digital Age

This class will outline and discuss the strategic role of marketing in a digital context, and further elaborate on the integration of digital marketing, social media marketing, mobile marketing and traditional and digital marketing communications. You will learn about the enduring strategic power of marketing communications in a digital world and learn how to plan for effective, strategic communications which integrate a wide range of channels including the traditional communications mix and the extended mix including all the assets of the brand and digital opportunities.

Year abroad

Year abroad
This is the year abroad, spent either studying at a foreign university or working as a language assistant or on a work placement. This year is compulsory to gain entry into Honours.

Year 4

French

French

The language course is based on a series of thematic dossiers dealing with current issues in France and the Francophone world. The focus of the class is on reinforcing and developing key professional language skills, such as translation into English, translation into French, liaison interpreting, and 'exposé' (formal oral presentation).

Students in Joint Honours French will additionally have one or more French Studies 4 classes. Everyone will take the Core Class, Images of Women, which considers the changing portrayal of women over the centuries, using the following texts as the basis of discussion:

  • Madame Bovary (novel, Flaubert)
  • Fatale (novel, Manchette)
  • L’événement (Ernaux, novel)
  • Women in the Paris Commune of 1871 (various historical documents)

Joint Honours students not writing a dissertation in French will take these two further classes:

  • The Occupation and its portrayal in French films
  • France since 1945

Marketing

Compulsory classes
Brand Management

The importance of brands raises significant questions of how to develop brand equity and how to communicate a branding strategy of differentiation, value and identification. The role of the Brand Manager is reviewed along with formulating the necessary communication strategies to build brand equity and secure market share.

More recent approaches in this vein suggest that the traditional Brand Management approach is all too limited, leaving many questions unanswered. Consequently more recent approaches address the co-construction of brand value, through viral branding, using social media, co-branding and brand extensions. In this respect, the principles of branding are now being applied beyond simply new product development, to such strategies as places, communities and countries.

Other key strategies that may be discussed include, luxury branding, nation branding, business-to-business branding and corporate brands.

Dissertation
The dissertation is an important part of the fourth year programme. Single honours students are required to submit a dissertation in Marketing while joint Honours students can submit a dissertation in Marketing or in their other Honours subject.
Elective classes
Social Marketing

This course aims to build foundational knowledge of traditional commercial-oriented Marketing, by examining applications of Marketing in a social context. Each year millions of pounds are spent world-wide to combat health and social problems such as HIV/AIDS, smoking, drug and alcohol abuse and rising obesity levels. At the same time excessive consumptions burdens society with building landfills and increasing pollution. Meanwhile there are still people who consume 'too little' and who suffer from hunger.

The class considers recent research in a variety of Social Marketing contexts and material is continuously updated to ensure that students gain an understanding of the most relevant and critical Social Marketing trends.

Advances in Consumer Behaviour

This class provides students with an understanding of some of the contemporary issues and challenges in understanding consumers. Building on the undergraduate Consumer Behaviour class, this module aims to develop students’ ability to analyse consumer behaviour in a variety of situations and to explore the complexity of 21st century consumption.

The class reviews consumer trends and the significance of consumer culture, and then explores topics that are the focus of recent research attention. Current topics include consumer identity (possessions and body image); consumer vulnerability; postmodern consumers; consumer tribes; consumption spaces; consumers and celebrities and consumers and ethics.

Managing Customer Relationships
The class explores the development of relationship marketing from its transactional roots and introduces concepts such as: CRM, customer loyalty, customer equity and customer perspectives on relationships. A contemporary look at relationships within marketing is introduced through examination of S-D Logic, co-creation and customer engagement, these highlight how firms build and utilise relationships with a customer ‘resource’ to create and offer increasingly more specialised and individualised offerings.
International Business Management

This class examines the theoretical underpinnings which help explain the operations of such enterprises, covering both international business strategy and international business management. This will be achieved by exploring contemporary issues in academic thought and international business practice.

Managing Integrated Marketing Communications: Theory & Practice

The class will create a learning environment in which students can enhance their knowledge of relevant marketing communications theories and develop the necessary analytical, creative and decision-making skills required to effectively manage IMC in a variety of contexts.

Sports Marketing

This class provides you with an opportunity to study and apply marketing principles and concepts to a sector that has gained increasing significance in society world-wide. We’ve witnessed the emergence of a sports culture in many countries. This, in turn, has led to the emergence of sport as a global industry.

Sport is one of the most important sectors in the UK in terms of spectator interest, participation and consumer spending. It is also a varied industry consisting of sports products as well as sports services, spectator sports, sports media and sport-related travel.

Small Business Marketing

Given the evolving nature of the job market, evidence suggests that 40% of graduates are now working in 'graduate level' jobs within SMEs. Alongside this, evidence suggests that SME graduate jobs show a concentration towards niche sectors such as marketing. As such, the aim of this class is to provide a theoretical grounding in marketing through the lens of small business organisations.

By focusing on SMEs rather than larger organisations it will provide a contrast with the prevailing focus of marketing and highlight how marketing is different in a small firm and how this translates into SME marketing competencies. Upon completion of this class student will be able to pitch themselves more favourably towards SME employers.

Tourism Marketing

This class explores underlying marketing processes and builds on traditional marketing elements in the context of tourism, considering both supply (destination/ community) and demand (consumer) perspectives. The class will explore a number of theories related to both marketing and tourism, as well of the application of these theories to real world cases, to ensure students gain an enhanced understanding of the tourism industry.

Assessment

French

Our assessment methods include:

  • written examinations, including translations
  • writing for a specific purpose
  • essays

Continuous assessment ranges from online grammar tests to group projects, while oral/aural tests are performed throughout the course. Students write a dissertation in their final year.

Marketing

The majority of our classes are assessed by a final, unseen, exam, supplemented by one or more forms of individual and/or group coursework. In some cases, students can obtain exemption from the exam on achieving a specified mark for their coursework (often in conjunction with satisfying attendance requirements.)

Class assessment methods include business reports, case studies, essays, presentations and learning journalism.

Students normally have one opportunity to be re-assessed for a failed class.

Learning & teaching

French

We focus on the four important language skills:

  • reading
  • writing
  • speaking
  • listening

We make great use of technology in the classroom – interactive lectures and digital language laboratories – and outside, through the use of web-based learning and streamed French television.

In later years you will perform presentations, write reports and interpret into English, which prepares you for potential future careers.

Scholars from French universities visit regularly to give guest lectures and lead workshops, at both undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Marketing

Teaching is given over two semesters in blocks of 12 weeks each. Methods include lectures, tutorials and seminars. As a student you will take part in team-based projects and make use of online teaching materials. Our industrial partners regularly assist in teaching and the assessment of student presentations.

Entry requirements

Required subjects are indicated following typically accepted grades.

Highers

Standard entry requirements
  • 1st sitting: AAAA (Higher English, Higher French B, Maths/ Applications of Mathematics National 5 B, or equivalent, plus one subject from the list of Highers below)
  • 2nd sitting: AAAABB (Higher English, Higher French B, Maths/ Applications of Mathematics National 5 B, or equivalent, plus one subject from the list of Highers below)
Higher subjects
  • Classical Studies
  • Drama
  • Economics
  • French
  • Gaelic
  • Geography
  • German
  • History
  • Italian
  • Modern Studies
  • Philosophy
  • Politics
  • Psychology
  • Religious Moral & Philosophical Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish

We recognise a wide range of Highers, however, your profile must reflect a good grounding in essay-based subjects.

A Levels

Year 1 entry
  • Typical entry requirement: ABB (A Level French B, GCSE English Language 6/B or English Literature 6/B, GCSE Maths 4/C)
  • Minimum entry requirement: BBB (A Level French B, GCSE English Language 6/B or English Literature 6/B, GCSE Maths 4/C)
Year 2
  • Typical entry requirement: AAA (A Level French B, GCSE English Language 6/B or English Literature 6/B, GCSE Maths 4/C)
  • Minimum entry requirement: ABB (A Level French B, GCSE English Language 6/B or English Literature 6/B, GCSE Maths 4/C)

International Baccalaureate

  • 36 (Maths SL5)

HNC

Year 1 entry
  • HNC Social Sciences: A in Graded Unit; Higher French B, Maths National 5 B or equivalent

Widening access

We want to increase opportunities for people from every background. Strathclyde selects our students based on merit, potential and the ability to benefit from the education we offer. We look for more than just your grades. We consider the circumstances of your education and will make lower offers to certain applicants as a result.

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

International students

Find out entry requirements for your country.

Degree preparation course for international students

We offer international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the academic entry requirements for an undergraduate degree at Strathclyde the option of completing an Undergraduate Foundation year programme at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre.

Upon successful completion, you will be able to progress to this degree course at the University of Strathclyde.

Fees & funding

How much will my course cost?

2019/20

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Scotland/EU
  • £1,820
Rest of UK
  • £9,250

Assuming no change in Rest of UK fees policy over the period, the total amount payable by undergraduate students will be capped. For students commencing study in 2017/18, this is capped at £27,750 (with the exception of the MPharm and Integrated Masters courses); MPharm students pay £9,250 for each of the four years. Students studying on Integrated Masters degree programmes pay an additional £9,250 for the Masters year with the exception of those undertaking a full-year industrial placement where a separate placement fee will apply.

International
  • £14,650

Dean’s International Undergraduate Scholarship

The Dean’s International Undergraduate Scholarship is open to new international students who will begin a full-time undergraduate course in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in September 2019. The award is a £3,500 scholarship per year for the duration of your degree. All offer holders are eligible to apply for this scholarship.

University preparation programme fees

International students can find out more about the costs and payments of studying a university preparation programme at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre.

Additional fees 

French 

Course materials & costs 

The majority of course materials are available to students via Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).  Students can print course materials at their own expense.   

The cost of course texts does not normally exceed £30 per academic year. Key language texts are used over 2 or 3 years of study. Multiple copies are also available in the University Library.  

Study abroad 

Studying abroad is an integral part of the degree course in Modern Languages - and usually takes place in Year 4.  Students who choose to study in France, Spain or Italy are eligible for an Erasmus and grant to help minimise the extra costs of living abroad.  This however, is not a full maintenance grant.  

Typically, students will receive around £3,000 for a full academic year of study abroad.  Students are required to meet travel, accommodation and extra living costs.  These costs will vary dependent on the country of study.  An estimated extra spend of £1,000 should be budgeted.

A range of scholarships are available for students of French, Spanish and Italian - and awarded on a competitive basis. 

Students who work as English language assistants will receive a monthly stipend.  In the case of France, this amounts approximately to 964.88 Euros per month gross (800 Euros net after social security deductions).  Similar stipends are paid in Spain and Italy. 

Marketing 

Course materials & costs

Undergraduate and Honours materials comprise of textbooks and course handbooks. All of the compulsory handbooks are available free on Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). Recommended texts cost on average £50 per text. Copies are available free from the library.

Honours students will need to cost for the binding of a dissertation and the purchase of a CD or pen drive for copy. Printing costs at the University are four pence per page in black and white and £3 for binding. The cost of a pen drive or CD will vary dependent on the store purchased from.

Please note: All fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my studies?

Students from Scotland and the EU

If you're a Scottish or EU student, you may be able to apply to the Student Award Agency Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government. Scottish students may also be eligible for a bursary and loan to help cover living costs while at University.

For more information on funding your studies have a look at our University Funding page.

Students from England, Wales & Northern Ireland

We have a generous package of bursaries on offer for students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales

You don’t need to make a separate application for these. When your place is confirmed at Strathclyde, we’ll assess your eligibility. Have a look at our scholarship search for any more funding opportunities.

International Students (Non UK, EEA)

We have a number of scholarships available to international students. Take a look at our scholarship search to find out more.

Available scholarships

We have a wide range of scholarships available. Have a look at our scholarship search to find a scholarship.

Careers

Strathclyde French graduates are currently working in a wide variety of environments around the world. Job titles include:

  • journalists
  • entrepreneurs
  • lawyers
  • engineers
  • education professionals
  • business executives
  • professional linguists
  • researchers
  • IT experts
  • civil servants

All language graduates have a range of transferable skills, which are greatly valued by employers. These include advanced spoken and written ability, competence in interpreting and/or translating and a high-level ability in other important communication skills.

Recent Marketing graduates have been recruited into the drinks, finance and service sectors with job titles such as brand manager, marketing assistant, marketing and sales trainee and media executive. Other roles include business analyst, retail manager, sales manager and retail buyer.

Contact us

Apply

How to apply – 10 things you need to know

  1. All undergraduate applications are made through UCAS
    Go to the UCAS website to apply – you can apply for up to five courses.
  2. It costs £12 to apply for a course
    The cost is £23 for two to five courses.
  3. The deadline is 15 January each year
    This is the application deadline for most courses. However, please check the details for your particular course. View a full list of UCAS key dates.

    Applications are still welcome from international students (non-EU) and those living in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
  4. You might be asked to attend an interview
    Most of our courses make offers based on the UCAS application. However some might ask you to attend an interview or for a portfolio of work. If this is the case, this will be stated in the prospectus entry requirements.
  5. It’s possible to apply directly to Year 2
    Depending on your qualifications, you might be able to apply directly to Year 2 - or even Year 3 - of a course. Speak to the named contact for your course if you want to discuss this.
  6. There’s three types of decision
    • unconditional – you’ve already met our entry requirements
    • conditional – we’ll offer you a place if you meet certain conditions, usually based on your exams
    • unsuccessful – we’ve decided not to offer you a place
  7. You need to contact UCAS to accept your offer
    Once you’ve decided which course you’d like to accept, you must let UCAS know. You don’t need to decide until you’ve received all offers. UCAS will give you a deadline you must respond by.

    You’ll choose one as your firm choice. If the offer is unconditional or if you meet the conditions, this is the course you’ll study.

    You’ll also have an insurance choice. This is a back-up option if you don’t meet the conditions of your first choice.
  8. You don’t need to send us your exam results (Scotland, England & Wales)
    If you’re studying in Scotland, England or Wales, we receive a copy of your Higher/Advanced Higher/A Level results directly from the awarding body. However, if you are studying a different qualification, then please contact us to arrange to send your results directly.
  9. We welcome applications from international students

    Find out further information about our entry and English language requirements.

    International students who don’t meet the entry requirements, can apply for our pre-undergraduate programmes.

    There’s also an online application form.

    For further information:
  10. Here’s a really useful video to help you apply

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