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BAPsychology & Mathematics

Why this course?

Our main focus in psychology is the study of human behaviour.

Studying with us, you'll look at conditions of behaviour – how we learn, remember, co-ordinate our actions and interact with others – and the reasons for differences between individuals, such as personality or intelligence.

Due to the popularity of the course and performance criteria for entry into Honours (Year 4) the numbers admitted to Years 2 and 3 of the course are limited.

Mathematics is everywhere: weather forecasting, cash machines, secure websites, electronic games, liquid crystal displays and statistical data analysis. Our course shows how mathematics is applied to solve practical problems, meaning you’ll learn the skills that employers need.

Our BA degrees in Humanities & Social Sciences are initially broad-based. In Year 1 you'll study three subjects, including your chosen subject(s).

Psychology

What you’ll study

Year 1

The first year covers the basic principles of learning:

  • biological bases of behaviour
  • thinking
  • memory
  • personality
  • social influences on behaviour
  • changes in behaviour through the lifespan
  • research methods
Years 2 & 3

The range of classes provides a greater understanding of human development and interaction, cognitive processes, individual differences and biological influences on behaviour.

Year 4

We offer a variety of classes that allow you to study an area of psychology in greater depth. You'll study conceptual and historical issues in psychology and write a dissertation based on your research project.

International placement

There's an opportunity for you to take an optional international research placement through Erasmus.

The School of Psychological Sciences and Health has Erasmus exchange agreements with several European universities. We currently have active exchanges with:

  • Humboldt University zu Berlin, Germany
  • Universidad de A Coruna, Spain
  • University of Twente, Netherlands
  • University Tubingen, Germany
  • Radbout University, Nijmegen, Netherlands

For general queries about exchanges to and from the School of Psychological Sciences and Health, please contact Dr Kellyanne Findlay.

Major projects

You can undertake an optional summer research project working with a member of staff. In addition, there are opportunities to apply for funding to complete summer internships between year 3 and 4.

Facilities

Our high-quality facilities include six purpose-built experimental research laboratories:

  • driving simulator lab
  • memory lab
  • perception and action lab
  • psychophysiology lab
  • psycholinguistics lab
  • oculomotor lab

Postgraduate study 

Psychology graduates can progress into postgraduate training to become professional psychologists. We currently run a number of post-graduate courses which provide additional research training:

Student competitions

We currently award two prizes to exceptional psychology students.

The Gustav Jahoda Prize founded in 1997 in honour of Emeritus Professor Gustav Jahoda, the first Head of the Department of Psychology, is awarded annually on the recommendation of the Board of Examiners to a psychology Honours student for outstanding academic performance in their final year.

The British Psychological Society Undergraduate Award is also awarded annually for outstanding academic performance in the final year. 

Mathematics

What you'll study

Year 1

Compulsory classes:

  • Introduction to Calculus
  • Applications of Calculus
Year 2

Compulsory classes:

  • Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
  • Probability and Statistical Interference
Year 3

Compulsory classes:

  • Differential Equations
  • Inference and Regression Modelling

You can also choose from a range of optional classes during Years 1 to 3.

Year 4

In your final year of study, you'll be able to pick classes from an extensive range of options. These options can very from year-to-year.

Course content

Year 1

Psychology

Psychology 1a

You'll take this class in semester 1 and are not expected to have any prior knowledge of psychology. It explores learning theory, developmental psychology, personality, biological psychology, and the scientific basis for psychology.

Psychology 1b

This class is taught in semester 2 and covers sensation and perception, cognitive psychology, social psychology, abnormal psychology, and research methods.

Mathematics

Introduction to Calculus
You'll study the basic concepts and standard methods of mathematical notation and proof, polynomial equations and inequalities, sequences and series, functions, limits and continuity, differentiation and integration.
Applications of Calculus

The fundamental concepts of calculus (differentiation and integration) presented in Applications of Calculus will be examined in more detail, extended to a larger class of functions by means of more sophisticated methods, including an introduction to complex numbers and variables, all demonstrated in application to practical problems including solving basic first and second-order differential equations.  

Geometry & Algebra with Applications

This class will introduce you to vectors and matrices, along with the idea of mathematical modelling through their application to real-world problems.

Statistics & Data Protection

Some basic ideas and techniques of statistics will be presented while introducing some essential study skills, allowing you to develop and practice personal and technical skills eg self study, teamwork, analysing data, writing reports and making presentations.

 

Applications of Mathematics

This class will introduce you to a range of interesting applications and explain the mathematics behind them.

Year 2

Psychology

Cognition & Neuropsychology

This class reveals how our understanding of higher mental functions has been enhanced through:

  • theoretical and experimental studies of normal human cognition
  • neuropsychological studies of how cognitive functions may be damaged as a result of brain lesions
Topics covered include disorders of the perceptual system, memory and attention, and the role of the frontal lobes in planning, motivation, emotion, and personality.
Social & Health Psychology

This class introduces social psychological theories and research that provide insights into why people believe what they believe, and why they behave the way they do.

Topics covered include attribution theory, aggression, prosocial behaviour, group influence, norms, conformity, obedience, and attitudes.

It ends with an introduction to health psychology, demonstrating how social psychological principles covered earlier in the class are applied to pressing, real-world health issues such as dietary behaviour, smoking/alcohol-use, and suicide.

Introduction to Research Design & Analysis

You'll be introduced to the main features of measurement, research design, and statistical analysis in psychology.

Following a general introduction, the course presents fundamental concepts, issues, and debates in the field of research methods.

You'll also become familiarised with the conceptual basis for inferential statistical testing, and introduced to different inferential statistics. Finally, a brief introduction to qualitative research methods takes place.

Mathematics

Linear Algebra & Differential Equations

This class will introduce you to the basic ideas of linear algebra, such as matrices and determinants, vector spaces, bases, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. You'll study various standard methods for solving ordinary differential equations and understand their relevance.

Advanced Calculus

Basic ideas, techniques and results for calculus of two and three variables, along with differentiation and integration over curves, surfaces and volumes of both scalar and vector fields will be presented.

Applicable Analysis

This class will give a rigorous treatment of convergence of sequences and infinite series of real numbers and of continuity, differentiability and integrability of functions of a real variable, and will illustrate the importance of these concepts in the analysis of problems arising in applications.

Probability & Statistical Inference

Presentation of the basic concepts of probability theory and statistical inference will be covered to provide you with the tools to appropriately analyse a given data set and effectively communicate the results of such analysis.

Introduction to Newtonian Mechanics

This class will develop your appreciation of the basic concepts of force, momentum and energy, and of Newton’s laws of motion and will equip you to apply these concepts to model physical systems, in particular the orbital motion of bodies.

Mathematical & Statistical Computing

This class will introduce you to the R computing environment. It'll enable you to use R to import data and perform statistical tests, allow you to understand the concept of an algorithm and what makes a good algorithm and will equip you for implementing simple algorithms in R.

Year 3

Psychology

Research Methods in Psychology

This class builds on year 2 and equips you with a broader, more advanced set of methodological and analytic skills. These skills are essential for carrying out the year 4 dissertation and for being able to read and understand articles published in academic journals.

Individual Differences

You're encouraged to think scientifically about conceptual and practical issues related to the study of individual differences, with specific reference to intelligence and personality. You'll gain the chance to put this knowledge into practice by designing your own measurement instrument.

Cognition

You'll be introduced to some of the core topics in cognitive psychology

  • perception and action, particularly how we perceive time and recognise faces
  • memory and learning, including models of episodic and working memory
  • language, including word production, sentence comprehension, and discourse processing
  • thinking, specifically problem solving, deductive reasoning and judgement and decision making
Development

This class reviews the ways that children develop from infancy right through to the end of adolescence. Key theories are presented and used to explore the extent to which children’s development is continuous or stage-like and whether specific skills develop more quickly than others. Issues relating to infancy, ‘theory of mind’ (understanding others’ thoughts and beliefs), executive function (planning and monitoring abilities), language, and communication form the core themes in the class.

Psychobiology

The purpose of this class is to provide the opportunity for you to learn the basic principles of brain function, and to encourage you to address the implications of this understanding for their own view of how behaviour is generated. It includes coverage of electrophysiology and psychopharmacology, neuroanatomy, research methods in neuroscience. There are focused sections relating to the visual system and the motor system.

Social Psychology

This class allows you to consider current ideas and positions within social psychology. Four themes drive the class

  • attitudes and attitude change, covering the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Health Belief Model
  • identity, with a focus on social, personal and group identities
  • prejudice, connecting both attitudes and identities, and covering a broad range of areas such as social representations, stereotyping, prejudice and conflict
  • epistemology, where consideration is given to the theory of knowledge, how social psychological knowledge is produced, and to what effect

Mathematics

Compulsory classes
Complex Variables & Integral Transforms

This class will introduce functions of a complex variable, define concepts such as continuity, differentiability, analyticity, line integration, singular points, etc. It'll examine some important properties of such functions, and consider some applications of them, eg conformal mappings, and the evaluation of real integrals using the Residue Theorem. It'll also introduce you to Fourier and Laplace transform methods for solving linear ordinary differential equations and convolution type integral equations.

Linear Algebra

Here we'll introduce basic algebraic structures, with particular emphasis on those pertaining to finite dimensional linear spaces and deepen your understanding of linear mappings. We'll also provide an introduction to inner product spaces and bilinear forms.

Differential Equations

We'll introduce you to analytical methods for solving ordinary and partial differential equations so you'll develop an understanding along with technical skills in this area.

Elective classes
Applicable Analysis

We'll introduce you to the basic theory and applications of metric spaces, normed vector spaces and Banach spaces, inner product spaces and Hilbert spaces, and bounded linear operators on normed linear spaces.

Mechanics of Rigid Bodies & Fluids

This class will:

  • convey the generalisation of the mechanics of single-particle systems to many-particle systems
  • convey the central ideas of a continuum description of material behaviour and to understand relevant constraints
  • ground students in the basic principles governing three-dimensional motions of rigid bodies
  • convey how the ideas of continuum theory are applied to static and inviscid fluids.
Inference & Regression Modelling

This class will:

  • review the concepts of probability distributions and how to work with these
  • present approaches to parameter estimation, focusing on maximum likelihood estimation, bootstrap estimation, and properties of estimators
  • present hypothesis testing procedures, including classical likelihood ratio tests and computer-based methods for testing parameter values, and goodness-of-fit tests.
  • introduce and provide understanding of the least squares multiple regression model, general linear model, transformations and variable selection procedures
  • present use of R functions for regression and interpretation of R output
Numerical Analysis

This module will motivate the need for numerical algorithms to approximate the solution of problems that can't be solved with pen and paper. It'll develop your skills in performing detailed analysis of the performance of numerical methods and will continue to develop your skills in the implementation of numerical algorithms using R.

Stochastics & Financial Econometrics

You'll be introduced to the basic concepts of random phenomena evolving in time, from two complementary points of view: probabilistic modelling and data-driven analysis. Presentation of underlying ideas of simple stochastic processes, time series models, and the associated probability theory and statistical techniques will be covered. In addition to applications of the methods to financial and economic systems, including modelling, data analysis, and forecasting.

Year 4

Psychology

Dissertation in Psychology

The dissertation is an opportunity for you to undertake an original piece of research, closely supervised by a single member of staff. Planning for the dissertation begins in year 3, and dissertations can be of such high standards that they are subsequently published in peer-reviewed academic journals.

Advanced Organisational Behaviour

This class is offered by the Strathclyde Business School, and draws on current themes in Human Resource Management understood from the perspective of micro-organisational behaviour theory and research. Although the theoretical underpinning of the material covered is primarily about work and organisational issues at the level of individual behaviour in organisations, a contextual understanding of these issues is also encouraged.

 

Advanced Psychological Theory & Practice

Choice of topics may include:

  • Belief & Anomalistic Experience
  • The Psychology of Mental Health
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Psychology & Ageing
  • Psychology of Language
  • Critical Review
  • The Psychology & Cognitive Neuroscience of Face Recognition
  • Neuropsychology of Ageing and Dementia
  • Physiological Psychology
  • Health Psychology
  • Practical Aspects of Memory 

 

 

Study abroad
Erasmus International Work Placement (elective)

This class is an option which is available to a restricted number of students who'll apply to take part. It involves a placement with a European University partner working in a research team during the summer between years 3 and 4. Additional assessment is the completed during semester 1 of year 4.

Mathematics

Compulsory classes
Communicating Mathematics & Statistics

This class provides you with experience of the skills required to undertake project work, and to communicate the findings in written and oral form using a variety of sources, such as books, journals and the internet.

Elective classes
Modelling & Simulation with Applications to Financial Derivatives

Here you'll get an introduction to ideas in mathematics and statistics that can be used to model real systems, with an emphasis on the valuation of financial derivatives. This module places equal emphasis on deterministic analysis (calculus, differential equations) and stochastic analysis (Brownian motion, birth and death processes). In both cases, in addition to theoretical analysis, appropriate computational algorithms are introduced. The first half of the class introduces general modelling and simulation tools, and the second half focuses on the specific application of valuing financial derivatives, including the celebrated Black-Scholes theory.

Applicable Analysis 3

This class will present the main results in Functional Analysis, give an introduction to linear operators on Banach and Hilbert spaces and study applications to integral and differential equations.

Statistical Modelling & Analysis

This class will provide you with a range of applied statistical techniques that can be used in professional life.

Fluids & Waves

You'll be introduced to the theory of Newtonian fluids and its application to flow problems and the dynamics of waves on water and in other contexts.

Finite Element Methods for Boundary Value Problems & Approximation

You'll be presented with the basic theory and practice of finite element methods and polynomial and piecewise polynomial approximation theory.

Applied Statistics in Society

You'll be introduced to a range of modern statistical methods and practices used in industry, commerce and research, and will develop skills in your application and presentation.

Mathematical Biology & Marine Population Modelling

Here you'll learn the application of mathematical models to a variety of problems in biology, medicine, and ecology. It'll show the application of ordinary differential equations to simple biological and medical problems, the use of mathematical modelling in biochemical reactions, the application of partial differential equations in describing spatial processes such as cancer growth and pattern formation in embryonic development, and the use of delay-differential equations in physiological processes. The marine population modelling element will introduce the use of difference models to represent population processes through applications to fisheries, and the use of coupled ODE system to represent ecosystems. Practical work will include example class case studies that will explore a real-world application of an ecosystem model.

Mathematical Introduction to Networks

This class will demonstrate the central role network theory plays in mathematical modelling. It'll also show the intimate connection between linear algebra and graph theory and how to use this connection to develop a sound theoretical understanding of network theory. Finally, it'll apply this theory as a tool for revealing structure in networks.

Elasticity & Complex Materials

We'll introduce you to general continuum theory with applications to Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids and elastic materials.

Optimisation: Theory & Practice

We'll provide you with a basic mathematical understanding of modern approaches to optimization and the calculus of variations.

Statistical Mechanics

Here you'll develop approaches to understanding complex or random systems in or out of equilibrium, based on ideas from statistical mechanics that incorporate familiar concepts and methods from neighbouring subjects like classical mechanics and probability and statistics.

You'll also be able to describe, through various examples and techniques, how macroscopic properties of systems arise from the ensemble action of many microscopic ingredients, and, specifically, how deterministic 'laws' may arise from basic randomness of a system with many variables or degrees of freedom. Fundamental examples include Brownian motion and the ideal gas.

Dynamical Models in Epidemiology

We'll introduce mathematical models which arise in epidemiology and population dynamics, and help you develop techniques for analysing the qualitative behaviour of the associated dynamical systems.

 

Assessment

Psychology

We assess students using:

  • class tests
  • essays
  • practical reports
  • dissertations
  • individual presentations
  • group presentations
  • degree examinations.
Online and face-to-face group project work is also included in the course. You'll take part in practical assignments from first-year onwards.

Mathematics

Understanding, knowledge and subject-specific skills are assessed by coursework assignments, reports, presentations and written exams.

Learning & teaching

Psychology

Our methods include:

  • lectures
  • small-group tutorials
  • practical labs
  • online tutorials
  • online wikis
  • group work
  • problem-based learning
  • one-to-one supervision

These methods are used across all years of the degree and aim to provide you with opportunities to learn and work in different ways.

Mathematics

A variety of different media is used in our lectures, including electronic presentations and computer demonstrations. We encourage you to take responsibility for your own learning and development.

As a mathematics student you'll attend tutorials and problems classes and take part in computer laboratories, coursework and projects.

Entry requirements

Minimum grades

Required subjects are indicated following minimum accepted grades.

Highers

1st sitting: AAAA

2nd sitting: AAAAB

Required subjects

  • Higher English B, plus one from the list below
  • Maths/Lifeskills Maths National 5 C or equivalent

Higher subjects

  • Classical Studies
  • Drama
  • Economics
  • French
  • Gaelic
  • Geography
  • German
  • History
  • Italian
  • Modern Studies
  • Philosophy
  • Politics
  • Psychology
  • Religious Moral & Philosophical Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish

We recognise a wide range of Highers, however, your profile must reflect a good grounding in essay-based subjects.

A Levels

Year 1 entry:

Minimum entry requirement: BBB (GCSE English Language B or English Literature B, GCSE Maths C)

Typical entry requirement: ABB (GCSE English Language B or English Literature B, GCSE Maths C)

Year 2 entry:

Minimum entry requirement: ABB (two core subjects at AB)

Typical entry requirement: AAA (two core subjects required)

International Baccalaureate

36 (Maths SL5)

HNC/HND

Year 1 entry:

HNC Social Sciences: A in Graded Unit; Maths National 5 C or equivalent

Irish Leaving Certificate

Subjects and grades as for Highers.

Additional information

Personal statement

It is important to take care over your personal statement. We look for information about your academic and career interests, and your range of skills, abilities, and relevant experience. Your personal statement should show evidence you have a strong awareness and interest in the subject you are applying to.

Deferred entry

Deferred entry normally not accepted.

Applicants with Highers

Due to the high level of competition for the number of available places, it is unlikely that Conditional Offers will be made to anyone attaining less than ABB at the first sitting of Highers.

Second-year entry

Second-year entry for A Level/Advanced Higher candidates is possible with AA/AB in the two subjects you're planning to study.

Admission to Honours

All students will be admitted as potential Honours students. Students may exit with a Bachelor of Arts degree at the end of Year 3 of the programme if they have accumulated at least 360 credits and satisfied the appropriate specialisation requirements. For admission to the final year of the Honours course, a student must have achieved an approved standard of performance. Due to the high level of demand on the course, there are additional performance based criteria used to determine progress from Level 1 to Level 2 Psychology and from Level 2 to Single Honours in Psychology.

Widening access

We want to increase opportunities for people from every background. Strathclyde selects our students based on merit, potential and the ability to benefit from the education we offer. We look for more than just your grades. We consider the circumstances of your education and will make lower offers to certain applicants as a result.

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

International students

Find out entry requirements for your country.

Degree preparation course for international students

We offer international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for an undergraduate degree at Strathclyde the option of completing an Undergraduate Foundation year programme at the International Study Centre.

You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Fees & funding

How much will my course cost?

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Scotland/EU

  • tbc

Rest of UK

  • tbc

The 2018-19 fee rate will be updated when it has been confirmed by the UK and Scottish Governments. Assuming no change in Rest of UK fees policy over the period, the total amount payable by undergraduate students will be capped. For students commencing study in 2017/18, this is capped at £27,750 (with the exception of the MPharm and Integrated Masters courses); MPharm students pay £9,250 for each of the four years. Students studying on Integrated Masters degree programmes pay an additional £9,250 for the Masters year with the exception of those undertaking a full-year industrial placement where a separate placement fee will apply.

International

  • 2018/19 - £14,050

International Study Centre

Please find information about the student fees for university pathway programmes on the International Study Centre (ISC) website

Additional fees 

Psychology 

Course materials & costs

All recommended texts and computer software packages are available from the University Library and Pegasus.

Other costs

Students should purchase a standard calculator. It's required for the duration of the course.

Mathematics 

Course materials & costs 

Class materials (lecture notes and exercise sheets) for the majority of Mathematics & Statistics classes are available free to download. For some classes, students may need access to a textbook.  Textbook costs are typically in the £20-60 price range.  These prices are dependent on format (e-book, soft or hardback) and whether bought new or second hand.  

PVG scheme (Protection of Vulnerable Groups)

Third-year Maths and Teaching students will need to pay for the full price of a PVG membership scheme.  

Other costs 

£40 returnable deposit for PRS handsets.

Please note: All fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my studies?

Students from Scotland and the EU

If you're a Scottish or EU student, you may be able to apply to the Student Award Agency Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government. Scottish students may also be eligible for a bursary and loan to help cover living costs while at University.

For more information on funding your studies have a look at our University Funding page.

Students from England, Wales & Northern Ireland

We have a generous package of bursaries on offer for students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales

You don’t need to make a separate application for these. When your place is confirmed at Strathclyde, we’ll assess your eligibility. Have a look at our scholarship search for any more funding opportunities.

International Students (Non UK, EEA)

We have a number of scholarships available to international students. Take a look at our scholarship search to find out more.

Available scholarships

We have a wide range of scholarships available. Have a look at our scholarship search to find a scholarship.

Careers

As a psychology graduate, continuing your studies will help you become a professional psychologist, which can lead to working in areas such as clinical, educational or occupational psychology. Many graduates also work in research.

Other possible careers are teaching, human resource management, social work, counselling and management and professional positions throughout the private and public sectors.

A wide range of employment opportunities are open to graduates in mathematics & statistics. Associated areas include the manufacturing and service industries, the actuarial, accountancy and banking professions, commerce and government, consultancy and education.

Many graduates go on to work as investment analysts, numerical analysts, statisticians, actuaries, managers and teachers.

Contact us

Apply

How to apply – 10 things you need to know

  1. All undergraduate applications are made through UCAS
    Go to the UCAS website to apply – you can apply for up to five courses.
  2. It costs £12 to apply for a course
    The cost is £23 for two to five courses.
  3. The deadline is 15 January each year
    This is the application deadline for most courses. However, please check the details for your particular course. View a full list of UCAS key dates.
  4. You might be asked to attend an interview
    Most of our courses make offers based on the UCAS application. However some might ask you to attend an interview or for a portfolio of work. If this is the case, this will be stated in the prospectus entry requirements.
  5. It’s possible to apply directly to Year 2
    Depending on your qualifications, you might be able to apply directly to Year 2 - or even Year 3 - of a course. Speak to the named contact for your course if you want to discuss this.
  6. There’s three types of decision
    • unconditional – you’ve already met our entry requirements
    • conditional – we’ll offer you a place if you meet certain conditions, usually based on your exams
    • unsuccessful – we’ve decided not to offer you a place
  7. You need to contact UCAS to accept your offer
    Once you’ve decided which course you’d like to accept, you must let UCAS know. You don’t need to decide until you’ve received all offers. UCAS will give you a deadline you must respond by.

    You’ll choose one as your firm choice. If the offer is unconditional or if you meet the conditions, this is the course you’ll study.

    You’ll also have an insurance choice. This is a back-up option if you don’t meet the conditions of your first choice.
  8. You don’t need to send us your exam results (Scotland, England & Wales)
    If you’re studying in Scotland, England or Wales, we receive a copy of your Higher/Advanced Higher/A Level results directly from the awarding body. However, if you are studying a different qualification, then please contact us to arrange to send your results directly.
  9. We welcome applications from international students

    Find out further information about our entry and English language requirements.

    International students who don’t meet the entry requirements, can apply for our pre-undergraduate programmes.

    There’s also an online application form.

    For further information:
  10. Here’s a really useful video to help you apply

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