BA Joint Hons English & Spanish

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Key facts

  • UCAS Code: QR34
  • Start date: Sep 2020
  • Study abroad: year abroad studying/working in Valencia or Zaragoza

  • Applicant visit day: March each year

Study with us

  • enjoy the best of old and new: a grounding in the classics as well as an insight into new fields of literature
  • in Year 1, you'll study three subjects, including your chosen subject(s)
  • join almost 600 million people who speak the world’s second most commonly spoken language
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Why this course?

We'll show you how exciting and wide-ranging our subject can be. Employers like the skills developed in an English degree: written and verbal communication, analysis and discussion of ideas and broad, creative thinking.

With more than 500 million native speakers, Spanish is the second most commonly spoken language in the world. Speaking Spanish will help you conduct business more confidently in countries that are becoming increasingly important in world markets. 

Studying with us will give you the chance to become a fluent linguist and, with our year abroad programme, an opportunity to experience living, working and/or studying in another country.

Student in Piece cafe, on campus, drinking coffee.

What you’ll study

English

Year 1

Shakespearean drama and modern, cutting-edge fiction.

Year 2

You'll study some of the most momentous events in literary history, with classes on Renaissance, Enlightenment and Romantic writing.

Year 3

Choose from options including children’s literature, America in the 1920s, the First World War and the Glasgow novel.

Year 4

In your final year, you’ll write a dissertation and choose from options including Victorian Gothic writing, literary snobbery, travel writing, oral narratives and fairy tales. Student numbers for optional classes may be limited in Years 3 and 4.

Dissertation

In Honours year, you'll write and research a 6,000-word dissertation with guidance from a personal supervisor. This is an opportunity to investigate a topic of your own choice. Previous dissertations have focussed on music and film as well as literary topics.

Postgraduate study

We offer these taught masters degrees:

Masters degrees can be the first step to a PhD or help with career and personal development. We welcome overseas students, including visiting students.

We also offer various research degrees, including an innovative MRes in Creative Writing.

Socrates exchange

You'll have the opportunity to take part in the Socrates exchange programme, in which you can spend your third year (two semesters) abroad and obtain credits that qualify you to enter the Honours year in one or both of your principal subjects on your return.

Socrates has partner institutions in Germany and France, as well as programmes in North America and elsewhere. While priority on Socrates is given to students who have proficiency in the relevant language, many classes (at least in the host English departments) are conducted in English and there is no language requirement for countries like the USA.

Spanish

In every year, teaching focuses heavily on language work, but you'll also discover the culture of Spain and Spanish-speaking countries.

Year 1

Two streams are offered in first-year: one for students with Higher Spanish or equivalent qualification in their chosen language and another for those without. Students in both classes study contemporary Spanish language and aspects of the country’s culture and society.

Year 2 & 3

You'll continue to develop your reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. In the cultural class each year, you'll learn more about the history, politics, literature, and cinema of Spain and Spanish-speaking countries.

Year abroad

Honours students spend a year abroad after Year 3, usually working as an English teaching assistant, gaining experience on a work placement or studying at a foreign institution. 

This is a central highlight of the course and a major formative experience for students not just in terms of language, but on many different levels, personal as well as professional.

Year 4

In your final year, you'll concentrate on translation, written and oral language and interpreting. You'll also have the chance to write a dissertation in Spanish. If however, you choose to write your dissertation for your other Honours subjects, you'll take two of our cultural classes. These classes reflect the research expertise of our staff and currently focus on topics such as social and political issues in Spanish and Latin American cinema, Spanish 20th century philosophy and history or an Introduction to Translation theory.

Major projects

At Honours level, you'll work on a specific project for your dissertation. You'll be supervised by a member of our teaching staff.

Postgraduate study

We welcome enquires from prospective students interested in doing a research MA or a PhD in the areas of Contemporary Latin American fiction and film. Topics of special interest include:

  • the politics of the fantastic
  • gender
  • class
  • identity
  • socio-political marginality
  • dictatorship
  • repression

If your interests align with these topics and you would like to have an informal discussion with your potential supervisor, please email Dr Jesús Rodero.

Student competitions

The Stevenson Exchange Scholarship is a competitive award which offers students funding towards a project they wish to undertake while on their year abroad. Staff select and interview several candidates for this each year. Our students usually do well in this competition; in 2019, one student secured £2000 towards his project.

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Course content

English

English 1A & 1B

These first-year classes offer an introduction to the study of English at university level.

In the course of these classes you will study a range of texts in the three main genres of creative literature - poetry, prose, and drama – and will learn to engage with the critical materials that analyse them, and have the option in assessment to respond creatively to some of these work as well.

Across this year you will also have an opportunity to understand how particular historical and social contexts shape literature, and to discuss ways in which historical literature continues to live and have relevance to the contemporary reader. Current texts studied in this class include Othello, Robinson Crusoe, Jane Eyre, and some contemporary song lyrics and Renaissance poetry.

Spanish

Spanish 1A

This course will further your knowledge of the Spanish language and develop the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in the Spanish language through intensive practical and communicative language work. This course aims to bring you up to level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. You'll extend your knowledge of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world and focus on the development of contemporary Latin America and on how issues relating to it are reflected in its cultural production (for example, films, journalism, songs).

Spanish 1B

Following on from Spanish 1A, this course will broaden your knowledge of the Spanish language, and enhance basic skills already acquired in reading, writing, listening and speaking. This course aims to bring you up to level A2+ of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. It'll also introduce you to new aspects of the culture of Spain through the materials used. Practical language activities, such as pair and small group work and intensive exposure to Spanish through audio, video and written texts, will enable you to progress from the levels achieved in Spanish 1A. Successful completion of this class will enable students to take Spanish 2A in semester 1 of second year.

or

Introduction to Spanish 1A

This course aims to give an introduction to the Spanish language, assuming limited or no previous knowledge of Spanish. It introduces everyday Spanish language, as well as certain aspects of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. The class is intended to help students to develop the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in basic Spanish.

Introduction to Spanish 1B

This course builds on and develops the knowledge acquired in Introduction to Spanish 1A. The class will broaden your knowledge of Spanish language and enhance skills already acquired of reading, writing, listening and speaking in basic Spanish. This class also introduces students to new aspects of the culture of the Spanish-speaking world.

English

Writing Through Time 1&2

These classes develop your understanding of literary criticism from our first-year classes by engaging with the question of the historical situatedness of literary production, offering an overview of key ideas, debates and literary texts from the Renaissance to the present. Once again our focus is on different genres of writing: this time, poetry, drama, and long and short prose fiction. Through these texts, you will engage with distinct modes of analysis, with literary critical approaches sitting alongside more innovative creative approaches.

Elective classes

The Construction of Scotland

This class offers a wide variety of ways of thinking about 'Scottishness' and Scottish national identity. The main aim of the class it to challenge assumptions of national identity as something that is coherent and fixed by exploring the many complexities, subtleties, and contradictions in Scottish identity. Focusing on issues of language, gender, and place, the class will encourage students to deepen their understanding of 'Scottishness' and the constructed nature of national identity through a literary and cultural lens.

Making the Modern Human

The class aims to introduce you to changing ideas about the human in relation to two key moments in history: the concept of the idea of the beast within from the age of Shakespeare, and the emergence of Darwin's theory of evolution in the mid-nineteenth century. The class will look at shifts in understanding the boundary between humans and animals and at what that meant for how people understood themselves at two very different moments in the past. Core to the class will be how scientific, philosophical and literary materials contemplate the same ideas.

TextLab

Textlab is one of several Vertically Integrated Projects (ViPs) running across the University. Each ViP brings together a team of undergraduates, postgraduates, and staff to work on a research-based project.

TextLab brings together students and staff from English/Humanities and Computer and Information Science. We work on research projects in the field of Digital Humanities (the application of computer-based technologies to the study of texts) – specifically using computers to analyse Shakespeare’s language, and building a website aimed at schools.

Spanish

Spanish 2A

This course will introduce you to more complex and formal areas of language, and enable you to develop further the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in the Spanish language. It'll also introduce you to certain aspects of the different cultures of Spain and Latin America through the materials used. Practical language activities such as pair and small group work and intensive exposure to the Spanish language through audio, video and written texts will build on what you already know, and give you a feel for the Spanish language as it is used in professional contexts. This course aims to bring you up to level A2+/B1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Spanish 2B

This course builds on and develops the knowledge acquired in Spanish 2A and will introduce you to yet more complex and formal areas of language, improving and developing further the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in the Spanish language. It'll also introduce you to certain aspects of the culture of Spain and Latin America through the materials used. Practical language activities such as pair and small group work and intensive exposure to the Spanish language through audio, video and written texts will build on what you already know, and give you a feel for the Spanish language as it is used in professional contexts. Successful completion of this class will enable students to take Spanish at third-year level. This course aims to bring you up to level B1+ of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Spanish & Latin American Studies II

This course will explore the interlinked themes of independence and isolation in Spain and Latin America. The class is intended to give students a broad overview of Spanish and Latin American social, political and cultural history through the examination of specific texts and films, as well as to develop their critical and research skills.

English

You'll select from this range of Year 3 electives, and have the chance to take one English & Creative Writing class too.

Detective Fiction

This course will trace the development of crime fiction from the mid C19th until the present day. Beginning with some of the earliest depictions, we will examine short stories by Edgar Allen Poe and Arthur Conan Doyle, before going on to look at C20th representations of the literary sleuth in Britain and the USA. We will consider well-known examples from popular culture (eg Hercule Poirot and his 'little grey cells', the stereotype of the American private-eye) as well as more experimental, postmodern examples (Thomas Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49 and Paul Auster's New York Trilogy).

Throughout the course we will be concerned with connections between crime and the emergence of the modern city, questioning the extent to which detective fiction aims to impose a sense of rationality and closure on an otherwise uncertain and alienating world. In its concern with the social and cultural role of crime fiction, this course will also reflect on the importance of deconstructive, feminist, post-structuralist and psychoanalytic readings of the genre.

Greek Theatre to National Theatre

This class is designed to introduce students to theatre practice starting with Greek theatre through to the work of the National Theatre for Scotland. The sessions are designed to be both theoretical and practical with students engaging with activities that illuminate the textual material studied. Drama was intended to be performed and to this end, study will also include that of set design and how that has evolved over the centuries taking into account the changes in style and expectations of an audience as well as the harnessing of technological advances.

Students will study in two-hour sessions to allow the theoretical underpinning to be embedded into the workshop activities and should be considered as a foundation for future study in theatre practice. The intention is to study a selection of plays, not as isolated written works, but in relation to their production and performance.

The class will give students insights into evolving theatre practices, predominately in Europe, through examination and analysis of dramatic fiction and their theatrical constructs. The class will draw upon the work of playwrights that will include Euripides, Shakespeare, Moliere, Pirandello, Chekov, Brecht, Beckett, Pinter, and Greig and examine the professional practice of contemporary theatre performers and directors. The class will work alongside practice-based research on the communication of dramatic fiction through theatrical performance.

International Influences

This class teaches you how various kinds of world literature have been influential on literature in English. Each week the lecture introduces a new literature, sometimes referring to one or two specific authors, and places the foreign literature linguistically, culturally and historically. We then look at specific influences on writers in English. Sometimes we will look at translations, sometimes adaptations, including into different media, and we will see that texts can lead to other texts through complex chains of influence.

Seminars often take a foreign text, and look at one or more English language variants of it.  One of the assessments is an essay involving analysis of adapted texts; the other is an essay on the more general issues which arise. Students are not expected to learn or know about any of the foreign languages involved.

Topics for 2019-20 are likely to be similar to those for the current year, which includes Sappho and Homer (Greek), Catullus (Latin), Dante and Petrarch (Italian), the Hebrew Bible, Borges (and other Latin Americans), Chinese and Japanese poetry, Scottish Gaelic, Indian and other South Asian literature, and Scandinavian (including Old English) literature.

 

Language in Business

This class explores the ways in which language is used in businesses and other organisations (including charities, government, education, etc.). The class also functions as an introduction to the theory of communication more generally; we explore how meaning is communicated, how texts are made coherent, why speaking is a way of acting, how conversations are structured, and how politeness is managed.

We consider gender as an aspect of organisations, and how language maintains and constructs gender. We look at the use and invention of words (eg brand names), including organisational metaphors and the use of storytelling in an organisation. We consider how language and communication differ across cultures, and how this can lead to cross-cultural misunderstanding, and we ask whether different languages shape different ways of thinking; as part of this, we consider the discourses of banal nationalism.

The materials we study may include websites, values statements, marketing brochures and posters, public apologies, political speeches, transcripts of e-mail interactions, and of meetings. One of the assessments is an essay involving analysis of one of these kinds of organisational discourse; the other is an essay on the more general issues which arise. Students are not expected to have any prior knowledge of linguistics or the analysis of language.

 

Reading Poetry

This class will examine the tools of poetry, including voice, rhyme, meter, schemes, and tropes, in a variety of genres and periods. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the conventions of poetry and the ways in which these conventions have been subverted or modified over time, allowing for innovation and introducing new voices, such as those of women, minorities and the working classes.

We will consider a number of poetic forms, such as the sonnet, the lyric, the epic, and the ode, with examples taken from the early modern to the present day. The principal aim of the class is to give students the tools required to read poetry with confidence.

The course will cover the sonnet, sonnet sequences, lyric poetry, dramatic monologues, narrative poetry, epic, satire, ekphrasis, and odes and elegies, and a wide range of authors including Donne, Pope, Byron, Christina Rossetti, Tennyson, Dickinson, Poe, Siddal, Rilke, Plath, Angelou, and Atwood.

Sex, Revenge & Corruption in Renaissance Drama

This class will focus on drama, a key genre in the period from the 1580s to the closure of the playhouses in 1642. Reading work by major dramatists such as William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson and Thomas Middleton, we will engage with a form that addressed both a highly literate and a popular audience, and is thus a particularly interesting place to trace ways of thinking in the period.

The common thread that ties this selection of plays together is their interest in transgression: what happens when humans cross the limits set by tradition, religion and the state? In the process of this theatrical interrogation, the plays pose questions about violence, identity, gender, desire, citizenship and the role of the theatre itself. We will read tragedies and comedies, and wonder why tragedies in this period are so often comic, and why the comedies end badly.

Theories of Literature & Wellbeing

The relationship between literature and wellbeing is of interest to the a number of employers and professions, including health and social care (evidenced by the journal Medical Humanities and the 'Get into Reading' programme run by The Reader, a charity). However investigations into the potential benefits of reading or hearing literature are hampered at the moment by the lack of a theoretical base from which to start. Academic work in English and literature is growing more interdisciplinary with sustained interest in the psychology of the reading experience for example.

This class combines recent academic research with the needs and interests of students to assess a number of theories which relate literature to wellbeing. It also encourages students to reflect on their own experiences as students, readers and critics of literature. Students with an interest in arts therapy may find the class a useful part of their degree, as well students considering teaching English or working in libraries, arts organisations or social care.

The class will also provide a new avenue for literary investigation for students who may be considering going on to do interdisciplinary research. The learning outcomes will differ from learning objectives insofar as they focus on broader cognitive abilities, non-subject specific skills or graduate attributes.

  • improved ability to understand what a theory is and how it can be evaluated
  • enhancement of skills taught in other English classes, such as textual analysis, argumentation, group discussion etc
Writing War

This class explores the literature of conflict in the 20th and 21st centuries, from the First World War to the Iraq War. The class treats war as a complex cultural phenomenon rather than a simple military activity, and as such we explore not only the literature of combat but also a range of texts.

You can also take one of the following English & Creative Writing classes as part of your English degree in Year 3.

Writing Short Fiction & Poetry

This core class will introduce creative writing students to two key genres: short fiction and poetry. Taught in workshop sessions by practising creative writers this will be a practice led class. On it, students will develop good practice related to the professional presentation of creative work, and will be introduced to the skills involved in reflecting critically on creative products and processes.

The class will build on the basic writing techniques that students have developed in their first and second year of study such as: point of view, characterisation, setting, dialogue and narrative structure. The class will also encourage and expect a more advanced and discerning set of reading skills. Looking at a wide range of material such as novels, short stories and poems the class will examine a range of different narrative strategies, contexts and approaches and use these as stimuli for creative work.

Dramatic Writing

This class will be based around a selection of screen and radio scripts that have formed the basis for dramatic works such as: The Graduate, Mad Men, Bladerunner, The True Story of Bonnie Parker and When Harry Met Sally and will introduce key concepts in the theory and practice of creative writing as these emerge in the context of writing for radio and screen.

Students will write dramatic scripts that demonstrate a good awareness of skills and techniques relevant to the genre, develop good practice related to the professional presentation of creative work, and be introduced to the skills involved in reflecting critically on creative products and processes. The class will be taught by practising creative writers.

Spanish

Spanish 3A

This course builds on and develops the knowledge acquired in Spanish 2B and will consolidate the students’ knowledge and use of the Spanish language within an appropriate cultural context in order to enable the student to live, study and work in a Spanish-speaking country. This course aims to bring you up to level B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Spanish 3B

This course aims to build on and develop the knowledge acquired in Spanish 3A and will focus on two relevant topics which includes the preparation for the year abroad. This course aims to bring you up to level B2+ of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. In addition to the final exam, a comprehensive project will comprise the other 50% of your final mark for this course. This project will enable you to put into practice and further develop the linguistic skills and cultural knowledge you have developed since you started studying Spanish at Strathclyde.

Spanish & Latin American Studies III

This course builds on and develops the knowledge acquired in Independence and isolation in Spain and Latin America - Hispanic Studies 2 (R4200), and adds a dimension of critical and theoretical awareness, as well as developing critical skills through a study of individual texts and films from Spain and different countries of Latin America, to build an understanding of the history and cultures in which they were produced.

Year abroad

This is the year abroad, spent either studying in a foreign university or working as a language assistant or on a work placement. This year is compulsory to gain entry into Honours.

English

Throughout your degree, analytical and writing skills are being developed, preparing you to tackle the final-year dissertation. The choice of subjects for your dissertation is wide open – we value and reward student initiative.

Year 4 is also your chance to take more electives as well as your dissertation in English – two electives for joint Honours and five for single Honours. Choose from:

Creative Economies & Culture Industry

This Honours option will explore how 'creative economies' operate in the twenty-first century, using a focus on local industries to investigate global issues and challenges. It will enable students to understand how the concepts of 'creative economy', 'cultural industry' or 'creative industries' developed, and explore the controversies which have often surrounded these terms.

Literature, Mind & Brain

This class responds to developments in literary research which are drawing on findings in cognitive science. A number of PhDs and postdoctoral researchers, as well as more experienced literary scholars, are using these findings to ask questions about the nature of literary experience in general, and the nature of specific literary texts in particular. In addition, the class responds to the increasing demand for interdisciplinary skills for humanities students. This is likely to appeal to honours English students who wish to bridge the gap between the critical analysis of texts and the rapidly changing model of human cognition emerging from psychology, neuroscience and philosophy.

The class will combine a weekly reading of a scientific or philosophical article with a short literary text and consider the implications of and/or problems with the article in the light of the literary text. No class of this kind is currently on offer at Strathclyde.

The 1930s: Literature & Culture

The 1930s is a period of cultural and political instability that is dominated by the inequalities between rich and poor, by problems with employment and housing, and by an insecure international situation in which the United Kingdom is increasingly isolated from developments in continental Europe. Into this conflict come authoritarian populist politicians intent on restoring strong leadership and the restoration of past national glories, and on the other side coalitions of the liberal left seeking a new politics to resist such authoritarian thinking. It is a period, in other words, strikingly like our own.

In taking the class you will gain an understanding of the distinctive concerns of the literature and wider culture of the 1930s. We will pay particular attention to formal questions that dominate the decade’s literature - those of documentary, realism, and the legacy of Modernism - as well as to thematic issues of class division and national identity, urbanisation, and domestic politics.  You will also gain an understanding of the relationship between literature and other forms of cultural production in the period, particularly journalism and documentary cinema.

By taking part in the class you will develop your abilities in close critical reading of literary texts and will gain further experience of independent learning and essay and examination writing.

Sixties Britain: Literature, Culture, Counterculture

The 1960s are often thought of as the decade of hedonism, hippies, free love and The Beatles. Yet the sixties were also a time of deep political unrest and activism, during which political movements for civil rights, anti-war and women’s liberation gained momentum. In addition, the 1960s were a decade of important technological advancements (including the introduction of colour television and developments in space exploration) which would have a fundamental effect on culture in Britain and beyond. This aim of this class, therefore, is to explore the legacy of the 1960s, its representation through a variety of key literary, cultural and critical texts.

Beginning with an examination of British culture through a literary lens in the late 1950s, it goes on to explore the central tensions of the decade. In doing so, students will engage with a variety of classic texts of the period, examining the 1960s in terms of culture vs counterculture, class, race and gender, reflecting on just how controversial the decade actually was.

Songs: music & literature

This class looks at songs of different kinds. We ask what makes songs both similar to, and different from, poems. We explore how words are fitted to musical structures, including rhythms and tunes. We examine how poems are set to music, or otherwise accompanied by music; we consider the difference between poetic and musical metre, and the use of rhyme. We explore different kinds of singing style.  We examine why songs give us strong emotional experiences.

We consider the difference between high and low cultures in songs, and the borrowing of songs between genres. We consider the role of songs in constructing identity, including national identity. We consider popular and rock songs, folk songs, and classical songs; in addition we will look at some overseas song traditions (eg Chinese, Australian Aboriginal).

One of the assessments is an essay involving analysis of a song which you choose yourself; the other is an essay on the more general issues which arise.

Students are not expected to have any prior knowledge of music or linguistics, or musical ability.

Soviet Literature: 1917-1967

This class looks at three key moments in the history of the Soviet Union, and explores how political contexts radically different from those in western Europe affected the way literature was written and interpreted.

All texts are in English, translated from Russian. The Russian Revolution in 1917 happened at a moment of intense experimentation in literature across Europe. In the early revolutionary years, many Soviet writers of the avant garde explored the possibility of experimental writing which could both reach the masses and help to bring about social change. We will look at both the literary theory and some of the experimental texts from this period, including a film. In the 1930s, during Stalin's rule, this revolutionary approach was sidelined by a top down emphasis on 'Soviet socialist realism', fiction that is easily accessible and offers a vision of a brighter future for a population living through unprecedented change. We will look at three of these Socialist Realist novels and appraise how far they conformed with the ambitions of the state, as well as considering the nature of literary realism itself.

Finally, we will consider literature by dissidents, writers who increasingly challenged the Communist regime in the 'Thaw' that followed Stalin's death in 1953, looking at novels by two dissident writers, including Boris Pasternak's Dr Zhivago.

Victorian Gothic

This class will examine the development of the Gothic tradition in a diverse selection of Victorian texts which will include works by the Brontes, Bram Stoker, H. G. Wells, Oscar Wilde and Arthur Conan Doyle.

The aims of the course are twofold. Firstly, we will consider the literary origins and devices of Gothic in the popular novels and short stories of the Romantic period (eg Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein), and trace the ways in which major Victorian authors modified them, paying attention to questions such as genre and inter-textuality. However, these textual studies will continually be placed within a broader historical and social context: the principal aim of the class is to assess how an understanding of the fascination of the Gothic mode for Victorian authors can be used as a tool for exploring the complexities of nineteenth-century society.

We will use the texts to consider issues such as urbanisation, scientific progress, religious crisis, Empire, new forms of communications technology and print culture, the ‘New Woman’, deviant sexualities, degeneration, decadence and the fin-de-siècle.

Throughout, the texts will be read ‘against the grain’ by employing a range of critical terminology (such as Freud’s work on dreams or recent work on ‘female Gothic’).

Wild in the Renaissance

The concept of 'the wild' is one that emerges in many different ways in the writings of the Renaissance; in relation to self-cultivation (holding back the wildness within), the control of one's world (taming the ever-present wilderness); and in relations with fellow humans in a changing world (in savage domination). These ideas get played out in numerous ways in the period - from poetic use of the symbolic resonance of gardens and gardening; the religious underpinnings of the 'missionary endeavour' in the New World and what that says about the concept of human nature; to the anxious self-examination of humanity's inevitable sinfulness.

This class will thus introduce you to key canonical texts from the period – plays, poetry, and court masques – by writers including Shakespeare, Jonson, and Milton, and will also engage with a critical and theoretical debates about the relationships between humans and the natural world from the new fields of animal studies and ecocriticism.

Spanish

Compulsory classes

Spanish Honours Language 4

There are three strands in the Spanish 4 Language programme, which are closely integrated with each other: Language A (writing in Spanish), Language B (analysis and translation into English of Spanish texts), and Language C (oral presentation and interpreting). The programme will enable students to function in the target language at a sufficiently high level of ability, both spoken and written, to be accepted as a fully competent member of the target language community, and effectively to discharge a professional role within and/or in relation to that community.

Hispanic Studies 4

This is a level four Honours class designed to build on the knowledge of Hispanic cultural studies acquired in Spanish and Latin American Studies 1A, II and III. The purpose of this class is to explore contemporary issues in Hispanic cultures. Class content will reflect the research specialisms of staff in Spanish and the actual texts and films studies may vary from year to year to reflect student demand and staff availability, as determined by the research focus of the subject. Each year, the class will focus on specific aspects of Hispanic history, politics, society and/or cultures. For example, possible class titles are: Gender and Sexuality in the Hispanic world; The Politics of the Fantastic in Hispanic Fiction and Film; Dictatorship and Resistance in Hispanic Cinema.

Elective classes

The Latin American Short Story

This course builds on and develops the knowledge on Latin American literature and culture acquired in Spanish and Latin American Studies II and III; and adds a dimension of theoretical analysis, as well as developing critical skills through a study of texts from the different countries of Latin America.

Shaping Spain: Ideas, Beliefs & Identity

Rooted in the Spanish History of Ideas, this course explores the condition and motivations for the development of some of the existing main currents of thought in Spain since 1989. It encourages a critical understanding of Spanish history and contextualises the work of several Spanish seminal thinkers (Unamuno, Ortega, Azaña and Zambrano) and it explores their thought in relation to the key themes of the course: ideas, beliefs, and identity.

Assessment

English

In addition to traditional exams, many classes are assessed partly or solely by essays. In later years, you have the opportunity to set the topics and titles of these essays themselves.

Some courses have specific assessment methods, for example, drama students are assessed for their writing and practical performance skills, while those studying digital humanities use social media and analyse texts with software.

All our classes use Myplace, Strathclyde's virtual learning environment, which can be used for online quizzes and keeping a reading diary.

Spanish

Our assessment methods include:

  • written examinations, including translations
  • writing for a specific purpose
  • essays

Continuous assessment ranges from online grammar tests to group projects, while oral/aural tests are performed throughout the course.

You'll also write a dissertation in your final year.

Learning & teaching

English

You'll learn through lectures, seminars and workshops and take part in small group work, individual and group presentations, debates and writing exercises. Some classes also take place in computer labs and include analysis of texts using software tools.

Vertically Integrated Project

We offer a research task in which staff, undergraduates and postgraduates work together.

Spanish

We focus on the four important language skills:

  • reading
  • writing
  • speaking
  • listening

We make great use of technology in the classroom – interactive lectures and digital language laboratories. Outside, through the use of web-based learning and streamed Spanish television.

In later years you'll perform presentations, write reports and interpret into English, which prepares you for potential future careers.

Glasgow is Scotland's biggest & most cosmopolitan city

Our campus is based in the very heart of Glasgow, Scotland's largest city. National Geographic named Glasgow as one of its 'Best of the World' destinations, while Rough Guide readers have voted Glasgow the world’s friendliest city! And Time Out named Glasgow in the top ten best cities in the world - we couldn't agree more!

We're in the city centre, next to the Merchant City, both of which are great locations for sightseeing, shopping and socialising alongside your studies.

Find out what some of our students think about studying in Glasgow!

Find out all about life in Glasgow
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Entry requirements

Required subjects are shown in brackets.

Highers

Standard entry requirements:

  • 1st sitting: AAAA
  • 2nd sitting: AAAABB

(Higher English, Higher Spanish, Maths/Applications of Mathematics National 5 B, or equivalent)

Minimum entry requirements*:

  • 1st sitting: AABB
  • 2nd sitting: AABBB

(Higher English B, Higher Spanish B, and Maths/Applications of Mathematics National 5 C)

*Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

A Levels

Year 1 entry: ABB-BBB
Year 2 entry: AAA-ABB

(A Level Spanish B, GCSE English Language 6/B or Literature 6/B, GCSE Maths 4/C)

International Baccalaureate

36

(Maths SL5)

HNC

Social Sciences:

Year 1 entry: A in Graded Unit; Maths National 5 B, or equivalent

International students

Find out entry requirements for your country by visiting our country pages.

Additional Information

  • deferred entry is not normally accepted
  • student numbers for optional classes may be limited in years 3 and 4

Widening access

We want to increase opportunities for people from every background. Strathclyde selects our students based on merit, potential and the ability to benefit from the education we offer. We look for more than just your grades. We consider the circumstances of your education and will make lower offers to certain applicants as a result.

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

Degree preparation course for international students

We offer international students (non-EU/UK) who do not meet the academic entry requirements for an undergraduate degree at Strathclyde the option of completing an Undergraduate Foundation year programme at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre.

Upon successful completion, you will be able to progress to this degree course at the University of Strathclyde.

International students

We've a thriving international community with students coming here to study from over 100 countries across the world. Find out all you need to know about studying in Glasgow at Strathclyde and hear from students about their experiences.

Visit our international students' section

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Fees & funding

2020/21

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Scotland/EU

TBC

Fees for students domiciled in Scotland and the EU are subject to confirmation in early 2020 by the Scottish Funding Council.

(2019/20: £1,820)

Rest of UK

TBC

Assuming no change in RUK fees policy over the period, the total amount payable by undergraduate students will be capped. For students commencing study in 2020/21, this is capped at £27,750 (with the exception of the MPharm and integrated Masters programmes), MPharm students pay £9,250 for each of the four years. Students studying on integrated Masters degree programmes pay an additional £9,250 for the Masters year with the exception of those undertaking a full-year industrial placement where a separate placement fee will apply.

(2019/20: £9,250)

International

£15,300

University preparation programme fees

International students can find out more about the costs and payments of studying a university preparation programme at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre.

Additional costs

Course materials & costs

The majority of course materials are available to students via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), MyPlace.  Students can print course materials at their own expense.   

The cost of course texts does not normally exceed £30 per academic year. Key language texts are used over 2 or 3 years of study. Multiple copies are also available in the University Library.  

Study abroad 

Studying abroad is an integral part of the degree course in Modern Languages - and usually takes place in Year 4.  Students who choose to study in France or Spain are eligible for an Erasmus and grant to help minimise the extra costs of living abroad.  This however, is not a full maintenance grant.  

Typically, students will receive around £3,000 for a full academic year of study abroad.  Students are required to meet travel, accommodation and extra living costs.  These costs will vary dependent on the country of study.  An estimated extra spend of £1,000 should be budgeted.

A range of scholarships are available for students of French and Spanish - and awarded on a competitive basis. 

Students who work as English language assistants will receive a monthly stipend.  In the case of France, this amounts approximately to 964.88 Euros per month gross (800 Euros net after social security deductions).  Similar stipends are paid in Spain. 

Available scholarships

Take a look at our scholarships search for funding opportunities.

Please note: All fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my studies?

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Students from Scotland and the EU

If you're a Scottish or EU student, you may be able to apply to the Student Award Agency Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government. Scottish students may also be eligible for a bursary and loan to help cover living costs while at University.

For more information on funding your studies have a look at our University Funding page.

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Students from England, Wales & Northern Ireland

We have a generous package of bursaries on offer for students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales:

You don’t need to make a separate application for these. When your place is confirmed at Strathclyde, we’ll assess your eligibility. Have a look at our scholarship search for any more funding opportunities.

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International Students (Non-UKScholarships, EEA)

We have a number of scholarships available to international students. Take a look at our scholarship search to find out more.

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English & Spanish

Qualification: BA

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Contact us

Undergraduate Selection

Our team are available to chat from Monday to Friday 9am-5pm GMT.

Telephone: +44 (0)141 444 8600

Email: hass-ug-selectors@strath.ac.uk