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MLitt Interdisciplinary English Studies

Why this course?

The aim of this Masters course is to give you an education in aspects of English studies which draw on the interdisciplinary possibilities of English studies, focusing mainly on literature but also on other cultural practices and language.

All aspects of a culture depend on narrative, fiction and language 

The MLitt in Interdisciplinary English Studies focuses on the representation, imaginary transformation and symbolisation of culture, as mediated through language and literature.

It does this by drawing on the interdisciplinary strengths of the school, and the English Studies section within the school.

The class will prepare you to think about the ways in which all aspects of a culture depend on narrative, fiction and language. You'll be able to apply this either to working in education, business, government or a third sector organisation.

The course also provides a preparation for undertaking a PhD, which generally requires a Masters qualification as an entry requirement.

What you’ll study

There is one core class, Research Skills and Methods in Humanities, taught in the first (autumn) semester.

You can then choose five further classes to be taken over the first and second semesters.

Available classes change from year to year; the following is an indicative list:

  • Making & Unmaking British Literature 1880-1950
  • Contemporary Scottish Cultural Studies
  • Visions of Suburbia: Interdisciplinary Representations, 1850 - present
  • Fleshy Histories: Meat Eating and Meat Avoidance 1500 to the Present
  • Narrative processing across Languages and Cultures
  • Global Queers: Travel Writing and Sexual Politics
  • Introduction to Intercultural Communication
  • English Studies Research Placement

You'll also write a 15,000 word dissertation in Interdisciplinary English Studies.  

English Studies Research Placement

The placement option provides you with the opportunity to put learning and research into practice in a real-world environment, conducting a piece of research according to a brief provided by the placement organisation in consultation with the University.

You'll be given the opportunity to apply for designated research placements as enrolment on placement is not guaranteed.

Course content

The MLitt in Interdisciplinary English Studies focuses on the representation, imaginary transformation and symbolisation of culture, as mediated through language and literature.

It does this by drawing on the interdisciplinary strengths of the school, and the English Studies section within the School of Humanities.

Core class

Research Skills & Methods in Humanities

This class aims to provide students who are undertaking interdisciplinary research with a broad introduction to a range of methods and skills in humanities research, and to construct your own training pathway in order to gain specific expertise in a various methodologies or skills.

Dissertation

Dissertation in Interdisciplinary English Studies

The 15,000 word dissertation offers you the opportunity further to explore issues of particular interest, encountered during the course. Dissertations should seek to make a scholarly contribution to the literary, historical and theoretical areas of enquiry that make up the Interdisciplinary English Studies.

Optional classes

Making & Unmaking British Literature 1880 - 1950

The class will allow you to engage with materials from Scottish, Irish and English historical, cultural, and literary studies. It will explore the formation of the idea of a national British literature at the end of the nineteenth-century, and its rapid disintegration with the pressures for devolution and independence in early-twentieth century Ireland and Scotland.

The class will focus on key moments, of economic depression, rebellion, and war, at which the ideas of a unified national culture were put under particular stress.

You'll read a range of primary literary and cultural materials in a historical and theoretical context, and will develop skills in textual analysis and critical engagement.

Contemporary Scottish Cultural Studies

The class will allow you to engage with materials from Scottish, cultural, historical and literary studies. You will read a range of primary literary and cultural materials in a historical and theoretical context, and will develop skills in textual analysis and critical engagement. In doing so, the class will provide you with a knowledge of some of the main developments in Scottish literary and cultural studies throughout the 20th Century.

You'll gain an understanding of the relationships between literature, culture and theories of nationalism. You'll also develop an awareness of a range of major issues in contemporary Scottish culture and become capable of applying sophisticated theoretical approaches to these.

Visions of Suburbia: Interdisciplinary Representations, 1850 - present

This class examines the impact that the development of suburban spaces has had on a range of literary and cultural genres. From 1850, suburbia came to dominate both the physical and imaginary landscapes of Britain. It produced new configurations of space (the suburban villa), new forms of community (‘neighbourhood watch’) and new social stereotypes (the ‘desperate housewife’). 

We'll consider how these developments intersected with the form and content of contemporary literature, cinema, journalism and architecture by focussing on a series of key historical moments and undertaking some comparative work on other national suburbias. Throughout we will maintain an interdisciplinary approach that seeks to uncover the mutual influences between the arts and the built environment, for example by tracing the influence of literary works on political, artistic and architectural writing on suburbia.

By the end of the class you will have gained a broad understanding of issues such as: the impact of suburban development on class, gender and familial relations, on debates about rural and urban living, and on constructions of private and public ‘spheres’; competing definitions of suburbia and the ‘suburban mindset’; provincialism, multiculturalism and national identity; and technology and globalisation.

You'll also have acquired a range of theoretical approaches for analysing these issues.

Fleshy Histories: Meat Eating & Meat Avoidance, 1500 to the Present

This class will engage students with literary and historical materials, and with theoretical work from animal studies. This will inform debates about the place, meaning and function of meat eating and debates about meat avoidance - and the emergence of vegetarianism as a social movement - from the early modern to the modern world.

You'll read a range of primary materials, including literary works and political tracts, and develop skills in textual analysis and critical and theoretical engagement.

Narrative processing across Languages and Cultures

Narrative processing is a field which has seen significant advances in recent years in psychology and neuroscience (eg Zwaan, situation models) and narratology (eg Ryan and transmedia narrative).

These bodies of research converge on the many ways in which narratives across cultures and media can be seen to share universal features. However, there is an even older body of work, deriving ultimately from Bartlett's memory studies, and developing through folklore and anthropology, which illustrates how narrative meaning and interpretation changes as it moves between social settings, media and cultures (Bauman, Barber).

This class invites you to engage with these three approaches critically, to form views on their implications for the use of narratives between cultural groups, and to consider potential practical applications for your findings.

Global Queers: Travel Writing & Sexual Politics

This class is designed to engage students with recent research on sexuality in a global context.

This continues to be a controversial topic with key global institutions and organisations from churches to the UN being unable to forge an internal consensus about the protection and acceptance of LGBTQ lives.

Through looking at non-fiction writing, this class will introduce students to key issue in the field through the perspective of writers who travel across real and gender/sexual border and boundaries.

Introduction to Intercultural Communication

This class critically applies the linguistic theory of communication, and theoretical approaches to culture, to a range of problems in intercultural communication. We explore what a culture is, and whether cultures differ systematically. We learn about the linguistic theory of communication, and approaches to discourse and conversation, and speech acts, including ways in which these differ between cultures.

We consider how face and politeness can be theorized, and how they differ between cultures. We look at how languages differ, and whether differences in language lead to differences in thought. We look at the self, and identity, and their relation to culture and cultural difference, and we see how mobilities relate to intercultural communication.

This class is relevant for those who aim to teach English to speakers of other languages who need to understand issues around intercultural communication. It is also relevant to those studying literature who want to understand how communication works, particularly in the culturally complex situations in which literature can arise.

Learning & teaching

Classes are taught by two hour weekly seminars, with some lecture content, and by supervision of dissertation and other projects.

Assessment

The course will be assessed by written assignments, and in some cases a presentation will form a part of the assessment.

Entry requirements

Usually a degree with at least a 2:1 standing.

IELTS overall score of 6.5 (no individual test score below 6.0) or equivalent.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course held at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre, for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the academic entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

Upon successful completion, you will be able to progress to this degree course at the University of Strathclyde.

Fees & funding

2019/20

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Scotland/EU

  • £6,500

Rest of UK

  • £6,500

International

  • £14,650

How can I fund my course?

International students

To recognise academic achievement, the Dean's International Excellence Award offers international students a merit-based scholarship of up to £4,000 towards the first year of tuition fees of a full-time Masters programme in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Scottish and non-UK EU postgraduate students

Scottish and non-UK EU postgraduate students may be able to apply for support from the Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS). The support is in the form of a tuition fee loan and for eligible students, a living cost loan. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Students coming from England

Students ordinarily resident in England may be to apply for postgraduate support from Student Finance England. The support is a loan of up to £10,280 which can be used for both tuition fees and living costs. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Students coming from Wales

Students ordinarily resident in Wales may be to apply for postgraduate support from Student Finance Wales. The support is a loan of up to £10,280 which can be used for both tuition fees and living costs. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Students coming from Northern Ireland

Postgraduate students who are ordinarily resident in Northern Ireland may be able to apply for support from Student Finance Northern Ireland. The support is a tuition fee loan of up to £5,500. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

International students

We have a large range of scholarships available to help you fund your studies. Check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Please note

The fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

Careers

Graduates in the MLitt in Interdisciplinary English Studies have particular skills in close analysis of textual practices, in the understanding of the symbolic structures of culture, and the role of tradition; they are skilled in formulating arguments and in writing documents; they are skilled in undertaking research in an original and innovative way and reporting on it.

These skills make graduates from this course suited to a variety of further opportunities, including progress to PhD, for which this course would be a prerequisite eg for AHRC funding.

These include:

  • teaching, including teaching English as a foreign language
  • marketing
  • acting as a researcher
  • work in the media

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Interdisciplinary English Studies

Qualification: MLitt, Start date: Sep 2019, Mode of delivery: attendance, full-time

Interdisciplinary English Studies

Qualification: MLitt, Start date: Sep 2019, Mode of delivery: attendance, part-time

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