MPharm Pharmacy

Apply

Key facts

  • UCAS Code: B230
  • Start date: Sep 2020
  • Accreditation: General Pharmaceutical Council

  • Ranked: Number 1 in the UK for Pharmacology & Pharmacy Complete University Guide Subject Tables 2019 & 2020

  • Work placement: hospital & community placements, optional summer research projects

Study with us

  • combine fundamental science with practical experience of working with patients and health professionals in community and hospital placements from the outset
  • benefit from our strong links with the pharmaceutical industry sectors and Schools of Pharmacy internationally
  • learn from professional pharmacy practitioners
  • accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council
Back to course

Why this course?

Pharmacists are experts in medicines who work alongside doctors, nurses and dentists as part of healthcare teams.

As a pharmacy graduate, you’ll need to understand the science behind drug discovery, development and delivery along with how patients react to the medicines they take. You’ll also have to understand individual patient care and public health issues to deliver the best health and pharmaceutical care.

Our pharmacy degree combines science and pharmacy from the start. Our aim is to provide you with the skills and knowledge to be a medicines expert to choose from the full range of pharmacy careers.

It's delivered by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences in Glasgow, Scotland. The Institute has strong links with the community, hospital and pharmaceutical industry sectors along with schools of pharmacy internationally.

Medicine bottle with pills on the table

What you’ll study

The MPharm undergraduate degree is an integrated Masters programme. Students studying the course will normally enter into Year 2 of the MPharm. As the course leads to a masters qualification, the workload is higher than that of a BSc Honours degree.

Year 2

Focus is on the normal function of the body and how this is maintained. You'll study how nutrients and medicines are used by the body. Topics such as the sale and supply of over-the-counter medicines are introduced.

Year 3

You'll gain an understanding of the management of patients with common illnesses such as cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, exploring how these occur and how medicines can be used in their treatment. You'll also learn about how medicines are formulated and compounded for use and how they interact with the body.

Year 4

Topics include the management of patients with cancer, mental health issues or who have more than one disease. The quality of medicines and how this is assured for different formulations is addressed along with the need for the pharmacist to ensure the clinical appropriateness of the medicines dispensed. 

Year 5

In your final year you'll focus on the application of evidence-based approaches to delivering individual and population-based pharmaceutical care including cases where there are no management guidelines. You'll also investigate the health economic implications of the introduction of new medicines.  You'll apply the research skills developed throughout the programme in an independent project.

Work placement

You’ll undertake community and hospital placements with optional summer research projects.

Facilities

Our high-quality, dedicated facilities include a dispensary with consulting area, clean room facility and pharmaceutical processing and analysis suites. You will have first-hand experience of the full range of professional activities in a modern training environment.

You can progress to postgraduate study. This includes the opportunity to study within the Centre for Continuous Manufacturing & Crystallisation.

Accreditation

Accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council in order to progress to pharmacist pre-registration training and then to register as a pharmacist

Go back

Course content

The MPharm degree is an integrated, full-time five-year undergraduate programme.

Normally suitably qualified students will be admitted directly into year 2. Entry into year 1 of the programme is available but is not the standard route.

Normal Function of the Gastrointestinal Tract
This class looks at the normal function of the gastrointestinal tract. It also introduces the pharmacist’s role in the management of minor ailments related to this system. This is the first MPharm class and it'll provide an introduction to all topics and areas of study that you’ll build upon throughout the programme.
Normal Function of the Cardiovascular & Respiratory Systems
You'll learn about the normal function of both respiratory and cardiovascular systems and the pharmacist’s role in the management of minor ailments related to these systems. It'll build on knowledge introduced in Normal Function of the Gastrointestinal Tract and introduce principles related to distribution around the body.
Normal Function of the Nervous & Endocrine Systems
This class looks at the normal function of both nervous and endocrine systems and the pharmacist’s role in the management of minor ailments related to these systems. It builds on material introduced in the Normal Function of the Gastrointestinal Tract and Normal Function of the Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems where the principles of autonomic control (eg smooth muscle, cardiac) were covered.
Normal Function of the Hepatic & Renal Systems
Following the drug absorption and distribution processes described in other classes, content here will focus on the hepatic and renal systems and their role in drug metabolism and excretion, which will then be further expanded across all Year 3 classes. The importance of knowledge renal and hepatic function on the sale of OTC medicines and the legal and professional role of the pharmacist in this area will be explored.
Being a Pharmacist 1
This class complements elements of your other classes classes by using a series of laboratories, simulations and experiential learning to allow you to show and do what you've learned. It'll also cover the behaviours and attitudes expected of a pharmacist as a healthcare professional, including continuing personal and professional development across all Year 3 classes. The importance of knowledge of renal and hepatic function on the sale of OTC medicines and the legal and professional role of the pharmacist in this area will be explored.
Management of Infection & Infectious Diseases
In this class, you'll learn about the scientific and clinical principles of identification and management of infection and infectious diseases. When you complete the class, you'll have a sound understanding of the immune system and its response to infection, causes of infection and infectious diseases (bacterial, fungal and viral), and how to treat infection and infectious diseases. You'll appreciate the problems encountered when administering anti-infective agents and understand how anti-microbial agents are developed, manufactured and used.
Management of Gastrointestinal & Endocrine Conditions
You'll learn the pathophysiology and treatment of diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and endocrine system. This will cover the pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, formulation and pharmacokinetics of drugs used to treat these conditions. It will build on concepts introduced in Management of Infection and Infectious Diseases related to the methods used to prevent, diagnose, monitor, manage and provide pharmaceutical care to patients with these disease states.
Management of Cardiovascular Conditions
You'll learn the pathophysiology and treatment of diseases of the cardiovascular system. This will build on concepts in pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, formulation and pharmacokinetics of drugs introduced in Management of Infection and Infectious Diseases and Management of GI and Endocrine conditions. It'll also build on the methods used to prevent, diagnose, monitor, manage and provide pharmaceutical care to patients.
Management of Respiratory & Inflammatory Conditions
You'll learn the pathophysiology and treatment of diseases of the respiratory system and inflammatory conditions. This will build on concepts in pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, formulation and pharmacokinetics of drugs introduced in Management of Infection and Infectious Diseases, Management of GI and Endocrine conditions and Management of Cardiovascular conditions. It'll also build on the methods used to prevent, diagnose, monitor, manage and provide pharmaceutical care to patients.
Being a pharmacist 2
This class complements elements of your other classes this year using a series of laboratories, simulations and experiential learning to allow you to show and do what you've learned. It'll also cover the behaviours and attitudes expected of a pharmacist as a healthcare professional, including continuing personal and professional development.
Management of Malignancy & Inflammatory Conditions

You'll learn the pathophysiology that leads to malignancy and develop further the understanding and management of inflammatory diseases of the joints, skin and GI tract, complimenting and building on the Year 3 classes.

This class covers the pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, formulation and pharmacokinetics of drugs used to treat these conditions and introduce the methods used to diagnose, monitor and manage patients with these disease states. You'll gain knowledge in developing a pharmaceutical care plan for effective management of patients with these diseases, based on legislation and national guidelines.

Additionally, you'll understand the professional role of a pharmacist in managing patients with malignancy and inflammatory conditions and how this links with the Chronic Medication Service.

Management of Central Nervous System Conditions

Having being introduced to the function of the Central Nervous System (CNS) and Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) under Normal Function of the Nervous and Endocrine Systems in Year 2 and how this integrates with the normal physiological function of the rest of the body, you'll learn about the pathophysiological conditions associated with the CNS. This'll build on Year 3 & 4 classes where aspects of normal CNS & PNS function including pain, nausea and vomiting contribute to disease symptoms and management.

Using exemplars from medicines used to treat these conditions, you'll learn about the quality control and quality assurance methods used to ensure that medicines are safe, effective and of good quality. You'll gain knowledge in developing a pharmaceutical care plan for effective disease management based on legislation and national guidelines in addition to understanding the professional role of a pharmacist in managing patients with CNS conditions and how this links with the Chronic Medication Service. 

Management of Patients with Co-morbidities
This class will build on the knowledge that you've gained in previous classes on the management of patients with single system diseases. You'll learn about the additional challenges of managing patients with diseases of more than one system, the long term effects of chronic disease and other clinical or demographic characteristics that influence which drugs can be used, how they are formulated and how they are administered while applying the principles of patient management from the classes in years 2, 3 and 4.
Being a Pharmacist 3

Laboratory and workshop sessions include using your knowledge of physiology, pharmacology, microbiology, medicinal chemistry, formulation, quality control of the medicines and community, hospital and primacy care pharmacy to the management of patients.

You'll demonstrate ‘show how’ and ‘does’ skills and expertise in the professional aspects of pharmacy. The examples will be primarily referenced to malignancy and inflammatory disease; management of CNS conditions; and management of co-morbidities but will also relate to knowledge from classes in year 2 and 3 of the MPharm. Laboratory and workshop sessions will equip you with expertise in application of your knowledge to the delivery of pharmaceutical care to patients with these diseases. Timely formative feedback, to allow you to gauge your own personal development, will be provided by use of moderated group discussions using scenarios captured from experiential learning to generate discussion and allow you and your classmates to consolidate learning.

Evidence Based Medicine

This class builds on the principles of clinical pharmacology, pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry and professional practice that were introduced in years 2, 3 and 4. If a split pre-registration year is introduced it'll also build on the period of learning in practice that could come between years 4 and 5 of the MPharm.

It focuses on how new drugs are identified, formulated, tested and monitored during the development process and how evidence is generated and used to inform clinical practice through both the development of guidelines and in the management of patients where guidelines are not applicable. 

Being a Pharmacist 4
Research Project

You're allocated an individual project aim (based, as far as possible, on your preference) which may be part of a common theme with of up to five other supervised students.

Project topics are associated with the research interests of the School of Pharmacy relating to our theme of 'new medicines; better medicines; better use of medicines'.

Projects can be either laboratory based or non-laboratory based as appropriate to the project.

QS logo 2019 - 5 stars
Complete University Guide 2020 logo - 1st for Pharmacology & Pharmacy
Athena Swan bronze logo

Learning & teaching

Teaching methods on our pharmacy degree include Lectures, laboratory classes, workshops and community and hospital-based experiential learning which provide and consolidate the knowledge and understanding required of a medicines expert.

Considerable use is made of computer-aided learning using a wide range of modern software, including formative multiple-choice questions (MCQs) and sophisticated simulations which have been developed by the University over the years.

Working Pharmacists (Teacher-Practitioners) also contribute to the course, ensuring sound practical, as well as theoretical, training in the most appropriate use of medicines. You may also have the opportunity to carry out summer research projects.

In addition, interprofessional learning with other healthcare undergraduates such as medical and dental students develops communication, patient-centred and team-working skills.

Assessment

Methods of assessment vary according to the subject and skills being taught and include formal written exams, multiple-choice questionnaires, oral presentations, dissertations, project reports and practical tests.

Back to course

Entry requirements

Required subjects are shown in brackets.

Highers / Advanced Highers

Standard entry requirements:

AAAB at Higher (Chemistry A, Biology A, Maths A, English B)

And

BB at Advanced Higher (Chemistry B and/or Biology; Physics and Maths can be considered).

Two Advanced Highers are required for Year 2 entry, which is the normal entry point.

Minimum entry requirements*: 

1st sitting: standard entry is for year 2 from S6 only. Exceptions will be considered at AABBC for year 1 entry (including Chemistry, Biology, Maths and English)

2nd sitting: Higher AABC (Chemistry, Biology, Maths and English); plus Advanced Higher in Chemistry and Biology BC in any order; Physics or Maths considered as an alternative to one)

*Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

A Levels

Year 2 entry: AAB-BBB

(Chemistry, Biology and an additional subject with Maths or Physics preferred; if not Maths at A Level, GCSE Maths A/B; GCSE English Language 6/B; a pass in A-Level Chemistry practical is required, where offered)

International Baccalaureate

36

(Chemistry HL7, Biology HL6, another subject at HL6 (Maths SL6, English SL6, required if not studied at HL) included in overall total of not less than 36 at first attempt

HNC/HND

Not generally considered on its own, except for mature applicants

International students

Find out entry requirements for your country by visiting our country pages.

Deferred entry

Not accepted

Additional information

  • all offers are subject to criminal record and other relevant checks
  • applicants must be registered with the Protecting Vulnerable Groups Scheme or other national equivalent
  • Pharmacy students are subject to Fitness to Practise procedures

Europe & worldwide qualifications

English language requirements

Candidates should possess one of the following in English Language:

  • SPM/119 - min grade C4
  • GCSE (Grade A or B)
  • Academic IELTS - 6.5 overall, no individual band score less than 6.0 (scores should have been obtained within the last two years)
  • Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English - Grade A
  • Cambridge Certificate in Proficiency in English - Grade A or B
International Baccalaureate

36 (Chemistry HL7, Biology HL6, another HL subject HL6 (Maths SL6, English SL6, required if not studied at HL) – included in overall total of not less than 36 at first attempt; IELTS 6.5 may also be required).

IMU/Malaysia

One of the following with chemistry and any other two from physics, biology, or maths:

  • A-lev/STPM: A, A, B+

Canadian Pre-university (CPM)

A minimum of 85% in six subjects (not less than 90% in maths, chemistry and biology preferred).

Other qualifications: Applicants with other qualifications should submit their enquiry to: MPharm@strath.ac.uk

Additional information

Entry to the MPharm degree is highly competitive, hence applicants are expected to obtain at least the required qualifications at the first attempt. School reports will be taken into account. Personal statements should be clear and also help to explain the educational history of a student, especially if this is interrupted or non-standard. However, if an applicant for an allied subject such as medicine feels the need to dedicate their personal statement towards that subject, this will not disadvantage them.

The MPharm is an integrated masters programme. Such degrees usually take five years to complete. The structure of the new MPharm for the majority of applicants begins in Year 2 and is completed in Year 5 making this a four-year course. If you hold or are sitting Advanced Highers including Chemistry or Biology and have obtained the required Highers, the offer will typically be for Year 2 entry. Where a school does not offer Advanced Higher Chemistry and/or Biology applicants may be given an offer for Year 1 entry.

Find out more about our admissions policy and terms.

rachel tolworthy wearing blue jumper smiling at camera.
The pharmacy course has given me a great foundation, teaching me the basics and developing key skills for my future career. I’ve been lucky enough to have summer placements every year which has allowed me to put knowledge into practice in the real world.
Rachel Tolworthy
MPharm Pharmacy

Widening access

We want to increase opportunities for people from every background. Strathclyde selects our students based on merit, potential and the ability to benefit from the education we offer. We look for more than just your grades. We consider the circumstances of your education and will make lower offers to certain applicants as a result.

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

Degree preparation course for international students

We offer international students (non-EU/UK) who do not meet the academic entry requirements for an undergraduate degree at Strathclyde the option of completing an Undergraduate Foundation year programme at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre.

Upon successful completion, you will be able to progress to this degree course at the University of Strathclyde.

International students

We've a thriving international community with students coming here to study from over 100 countries across the world. Find out all you need to know about studying in Glasgow at Strathclyde and hear from students about their experiences.

Visit our international students' section

map of the world

Back to course

Fees & funding

2020/21

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Scotland/EU

TBC

Fees for students domiciled in Scotland and the EU are subject to confirmation in early 2020 by the Scottish Funding Council.

(2019/20: £1,820)

Rest of UK

TBC

Assuming no change in RUK fees policy over the period, the total amount payable by undergraduate students will be capped. For students commencing study in 2020/21, this is capped at £27,750 (with the exception of the MPharm and integrated Masters programmes), MPharm students pay £9,250 for each of the four years. Students studying on integrated Masters degree programmes pay an additional £9,250 for the Masters year with the exception of those undertaking a full-year industrial placement where a separate placement fee will apply.

(2019/20: £9,250)

International

£19,750

Additional costs

Lab coats and safety goggles: 

  • approx £25  

PVG scheme (Protection of Vulnerable Groups)

  • membership scheme costs £59
University preparation programme fees

International students can find out more about the costs and payments of studying a university preparation programme at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre.

Available scholarships

Take a look at our scholarships search for funding opportunities.

Please note: All fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my studies?

Go back

Students from Scotland and the EU

If you're a Scottish or EU student, you may be able to apply to the Student Award Agency Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government. Scottish students may also be eligible for a bursary and loan to help cover living costs while at University.

For more information on funding your studies have a look at our University Funding page.

Go back

Students from England, Wales & Northern Ireland

We have a generous package of bursaries on offer for students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales:

You don’t need to make a separate application for these. When your place is confirmed at Strathclyde, we’ll assess your eligibility. Have a look at our scholarship search for any more funding opportunities.

Go back

International Students (Non-UK Scholarships, EEA)

We have a number of scholarships available to international students. Take a look at our scholarship search to find out more.

Glasgow is Scotland's biggest & most cosmopolitan city

Our campus is based in the very heart of Glasgow, Scotland's largest city. National Geographic named Glasgow as one of its 'Best of the World' destinations, while Rough Guide readers have voted Glasgow the world’s friendliest city! And Time Out named Glasgow in the top ten best cities in the world - we couldn't agree more!

We're in the city centre, next to the Merchant City, both of which are great locations for sightseeing, shopping and socialising alongside your studies.

Find out what some of our students think about studying in Glasgow!

Find out all about life in Glasgow
Back to course

Careers

To become a pharmacist in the UK, you need an MPharm degree which has been accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC), followed by a pre-registration year (after graduation) in a hospital or community practice. At the end of this, you must pass the GPhC registration assessment.

However, please note that obtaining an MPharm from the University of Strathclyde does not guarantee a pre-registration position.

Once registered with the GPhC, pharmacy graduates enjoy good employment prospects with attractive starting salaries. The majority are employed in either community or hospital pharmacies.

MPharm graduates may also follow careers in research and manufacturing in the pharmaceutical industry.

There are also opportunities for post-graduate study – both PhD and DPharm – including the University’s new doctoral training centre within the Centre for Continuous Manufacturing and Crystallisation.

Other graduates may also pursue a career in medical writing, clinical drug trials, or medical sales while some pursue research and academic careers to educate and inspire the next generation of pharmacists.

Visit Royal Pharmaceutical Society for further information on pharmacy careers.

How much will I earn?

Newly qualified, NHS hospital pharmacists start on Band 5, earning around £21,000 a year. Experienced pharmacists on Band 6 and earn around £34,876 a year.

Pharmacists in management positions on Band 8 can earn up to £81,000 a year.

Salaries in community pharmacies will be similar but if you work for a large chain, you may also be able to earn bonuses.*

Where are they now?

98.7% of graduates are in work or further study.**

Recent job titles include:

  • Assistant Scientist
  • Pharmacist
  • Rotational Pharmacist
  • Trainee Pharmacist

Recent employers include:

  • Bannermans Pharmacy
  • Boots
  • Charles River Laboratories
  • Kings Colleague Hospital London
  • Lloyds Pharmacy
  • NHS

*Information is only intended as a guide.

**Based on the national Destination of Leavers Survey.

Back to course

Apply

Pharmacy

Qualification: MPharm

Back to course

Contact us

Dr Alan McCruden

Telephone: +44 (0)141 548 3749

Email: MPharm@strath.ac.uk

Carol Barnett

Telephone: +44 (0)141 548 3749

Email: MPharm@strath.ac.uk