Equality & DiversitySupport and Advice

At Strathclyde, our first priority is the safety, health and wellbeing of our University community. 

A safe campus is the responsibility of everyone who is part of the University community: staff, students and visitors.

Unacceptable behaviour has no place at Strathclyde and we will not tolerate any form of discrimination (e.g. racism), harassment, victimisation or bullying.

This page provide information on where to go for support and advice, and how to report concerns and incidents.

A safe campus is the responsibility of everyone who is part of the University community: staff, students and visitors.

We all have a responsibility to report if someone’s safety has been threatened, whether that is through inappropriate behaviour, verbal or physical harassment, or other actions that make them feel unsafe, for example threatening posters, stickers or graffiti.

If you have witnessed or experienced any such behaviour or incidents, you can report via our online Report and Support facility.

Please report, even if you think you don’t have enough information for us to take action immediately.

The student Disability & Wellbeing Service has a range of advisers with specialist expertise in disability, health, mental health and counselling. They offer a broad range of support to students with any disability, mental health and wellbeing related needs.

Visit the staff Wellbeing Hub for information on emotional and mental wellbeing, financial wellbeing, physical wellbeing and agile working support for staff.

The University's Occupational Health Service provides a range of services to protect health at work, assess and advise on fitness for work and to ensure health issues are effectively managed. The Service focuses on a working environment where physical and psychological wellbeing can be supported and sustained.

The Advice Hub is an independent and confidential advice service for Strathclyde students, run by professional staff advisers who can support you on matters related to your studies, housing, and funding and finance.

At Strathclyde, your safety, health, and well-being are always our top priority.

We want you to have a wonderful experience in every way while you're here with us at Strathclyde. We promote gender equality and do not tolerate any form of Gender-based Violence (GBV) or abusive behaviour. We do not stand for rape culture, and there is no place here for a culture that reinforces misogynistic attitudes.

Visit the Strathclyde Safe360° hub for further information on gender-based violence, including what it is, how to report it and how to get support.

The Ask Alex service for trans, non-binary and gender diverse students and staff connects named contacts working across the University who can provide advice, assistance and support in a range of areas. The named contacts act as a friendly first port-of-call who can coordinate support or find out information on your behalf.

We aim to be a place of respect, inclusion and acceptance where every individual is valued and supported, regardless of your beliefs - spiritual or otherwise.

The University Chaplaincy is a place apart from the busyness of university life. Here, you can meet old and new friends to relax, study or spend time in quiet thought or meditation, speak with Chaplains in confidence, or participate in wellbeing activities and faith-based events. 

At Strathclyde, our first priority is the safety, health and wellbeing of our University community. 

Unacceptable behaviour has no place at Strathclyde and we will not tolerate any form of discrimination, harassment, victimisation or bullying. 

Safe360° means incorporating safety in every area of University life. For more information about policies, procedures and support relating to safeguarding, gender-based violence and dignity & respect, visit the Safe360° webpages.

What is a hate crime?

According to Police Scotland, a hate crime is any criminal offence which is any crime which is understood by the victim or any other person as being motivated (wholly or partly) by malice or ill will towards a social group. Hate crimes can be verbal or physical. If someone targets you, or someone else, because of a dislike or prejudice of your age, disability, race, religion, sexual orientation, transgender identity or variations in sex characteristics then you should report it as a hate crime.

How do I report a hate crime?

You can report a hate crime as follows:

If you are a Strathclyde student or staff member and have experienced or witnessed a hate crime (on or off campus), or if you are concerned about a Strathclyde student or staff member, please submit a report via Report and Support to access guidance and support and to discuss available help.

What is forced marriage?

A forced marriage is a marriage in which one or both parties do not (or, in the case of some adults with learning or physical disabilities, cannot) consent to the marriage and duress is involved. Duress includes both physical and emotional pressure. It is very different from arranged marriage, where both parties give their full and free consent to the marriage.

The Scottish Government believes that all people in Scotland who are eligible to marry or enter into a civil partnership have a right to do so freely and without coercion. Scotland has introduced Forced Marriage Protection Orders, which safeguard your rights and make it a criminal offence to breach the Order.

Read the Forced Marriage (Scotland) Act 2011

How can I get support with forced marriage?

If you are a Strathclyde student or staff member and believe you are being forced into a marriage against your consent, or if you are concerned about a Strathclyde student or staff member in this situation, please submit a report via Report and Support to access guidance and support and to discuss available help.

These external organisations can also provide support, advice and information: