BSc Hons Psychology & Counselling

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Key facts

  • UCAS Code: C8B9
  • Accreditation: COSCA (Counselling & Psychotherapy in Scotland)

  • Study mode & duration: 36 months or 48 months full-time

Study with us

  • study psychology with an applied focus
  • benefit from training in Person-Centred Counselling
  • gain broad-based knowledge of the core domains of psychology and training in counselling skills
  • the degree meets the requirements for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society
  • develop enhanced interpersonal communication skills. Gain the award of a COSCA-accredited Counselling Skills certificate
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Why this course?

This three or four-year* joint honours programme offers a route for students to combine psychology and counselling studies. The course will prepare you for further postgraduate study in counselling, counselling psychology or psychology, or for employment in other professional roles (eg support work) which would benefit from counselling skills training and an understanding of counselling theory.

Person-centred-experiential counselling and psychotherapy is internationally recognised and one of the leading therapeutic approaches to mental health and well-being. The combination with psychology will enable students to approach a range of clients across a broad spectrum of psychological distress. It'll equip you with the skills to critically assess an evidence base and develop appropriate theoretical questions and methodology to further your professional development and knowledge.

Our current courses meet the requirements for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and a COSCA-accredited Certificate in Counselling Skills is embedded within this course. Both of these are accepted as prerequisites for entry into professional training courses in psychology or counselling.

*Applicants with A-level qualifications or equivalent may qualify for direct entry to Year 2. Other applicants will be required to successfully complete a foundation year on our BA Psychology programme.

Female therapist has a discussion with client.

THE Awards 2019: UK University of the Year Winner

What you'll study

Students on the four-year course will take Year 1 of the BA Psychology programme.

Psychology

Year 2 classes: Social & Health Psychology, Cognition & Neuropsychology, Introduction to Research Design & Analysis

Year 3 classes: Research Methods in Psychology, Individual Differences, Social Psychology

Year 4 classes: Honours Development, Honours Cognition, Honours Psychobiology

Counselling

Year 2 classes: Theories of Counselling/Psychotherapy, Positive & Humanistic Psychology, Mental Health Difficulties

Year 3 classes: Person-Centred Theory, Personal Development, Counselling Skills Laboratory

Year 4 classes: Counselling Skills Practicum or Counselling Research Practicum

Dissertation

The Year 4 Dissertation is supervised by the School of Psychological Sciences & Health on a topic that is psychological in nature and focuses on aspects of clinical/counselling psychology and/or therapeutic/behaviour change interventions.

Major projects

The Counselling Skills Laboratory contains a skills practice component which is part of the final assignment. Although this doesn't equip students to practice as therapists, it does appeal to employers and further training institutions, because it develops improved listening skills which are advantageous in a wide range of psychological interventions. The psychology dissertation requires a substantial empirical study in psychology or counselling, evidencing all aspects of the research process.

Facilities

You'll have access to general computer and experimental labs as well as specialised labs including: 

  • customised counselling suite
  • eyetracking labs
  • driving simulator
  • psychophysiological equipment
  • motion tracking lab
The practical counselling skills element of the programme was well implemented and centred around the person-centred principles of congruence, empathy, and unconditional positive regard. This began with learning how to engage in self-awareness, active listening, ethical principles such as confidentiality, and with progressive practice within peer triad group work.
Colette Hutchison

'How to' guides

Find out all you need to know about how to become a psychologist and a counsellor.

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Course content

Semester 1

Social & Health Psychology

This class introduces social psychological theories and research that provide insights into why people believe what they believe, and why they behave the way they do.

Topics covered include attribution theory, aggression, prosocial behaviour, group influence, norms, conformity, obedience, and attitudes.

It ends with an introduction to health psychology, demonstrating how social psychological principles covered earlier in the class are applied to pressing, real-world health issues such as dietary behaviour, smoking/alcohol-use, and suicide.

Introduction to Mental Health Difficulties

This class will provide students with an introduction to and a deeper understanding of the range of different forms of psychological difficulty, in both adults and children. It covers syndromes of psychological difficulty, the key theories for their aetiology, and the main methods for assessing, studying and treating the different forms of psychological difficulty.

Semesters 1 & 2

Introduction to Research Design & Analysis

You'll be introduced to the main features of measurement, research design, and statistical analysis in psychology.

Following a general introduction, the course presents fundamental concepts, issues, and debates in the field of research methods.

You'll also become familiarised with the conceptual basis for inferential statistical testing, and introduced to different inferential statistics. Finally, a brief introduction to qualitative research methods takes place.

Theories of Counselling/Psychotherapy

In this class, students are introduced to a range of approaches to counselling/psychotherapy, including important theoretical models such as Psychodynamic, Cognitive-Behavioural, Humanistic-Experiential, and Systemic models.

It will cover classic approaches and more recent variations and developments, as well as integrative/pluralistic approaches.

Each of these theoretical orientations approach the sources of human function and dysfunction from different perspectives and offer different understandings about how human beings overcome psychological difficulties and engage in productive psychological change.

Semester 2

Cognition & Neuropsychology

This class reveals how our understanding of higher mental functions has been enhanced through:

  • theoretical and experimental studies of normal human cognition
  • neuropsychological studies of how cognitive functions may be damaged as a result of brain lesions
Topics covered include disorders of the perceptual system, memory and attention, and the role of the frontal lobes in planning, motivation, emotion, and personality.

Positive & Humanistic Psychology

This class will cover a range of approaches to psychology that emphasise human experience and potential for positive adaptation, growth and happiness.

It'll cover both humanistic and positive psychology approaches. It'll first address classic forms of humanistic psychology, including existentialism, self-actualisation, human potential, phenomenology, the person-centred approach, and gestalt therapy. Then it will turn to recent developments in positive psychology, which emphasises factors that contribute to human flourishing, including character strengths and virtues, positive emotional states, mindfulness, and meaning/purpose.

Semester 1

Research Methods in Psychology

This class builds on year 2 and equips you with a broader, more advanced set of methodological and analytic skills. These skills are essential for carrying out the year 4 dissertation and for being able to read and understand articles published in academic journals.

Semesters 1 & 2

Person-Centred Theory

This class will explain, explore and critically evaluate the principal theoretical approach adopted by the counselling component of the course: the person-centred-experiential approach to counselling skills.

Personal Development

This class builds on the more general foundation theory classes from Year 2 of the course. Counselling skills consist of three components:
  • knowledge: theory and conceptual frameworks that guide action
  • experience: self-awareness, self-acceptance and resilience under stress, including encountering diverse and difficult experiences and personal blocks
  • action: putting theory and experience into practice

Each of three classes in the Counselling track of Year 3 focuses on one of these components. The Personal Development class focuses on two main strands of the experiential component of counselling skills: Discovering and confronting attitudes that inhibit the course member's functioning; and moving towards becoming more self-accepting and having greater confidence in personal congruent functioning.

Counselling Skills Laboratory

The Counselling Skills Laboratory consists of three components:

  • knowledge: theory and conceptual frameworks that guide action
  • personal development: self-awareness, self-acceptance and resilience under stress, including encountering diverse and difficult experiences and personal blocks
  • interpersonal skills: putting theory and experience into practice

Semester 2

Individual Differences

You're encouraged to think scientifically about conceptual and practical issues related to the study of individual differences, with specific reference to intelligence and personality. You'll gain the chance to put this knowledge into practice by designing your own measurement instrument.

Social Psychology

This class allows you to consider current ideas and positions within social psychology. Four themes drive the class

  • Attitudes and attitude change, covering the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Health Belief Model
  • Identity, with a focus on social, personal and group identities
  • Prejudice, connecting both attitudes and identities, and covering a broad range of areas such as social representations, stereotyping, prejudice and conflict
  • Epistemology, where consideration is given to the theory of knowledge, how social psychological knowledge is produced, and to what effect

Counselling

Honours Development

This class will focus on key developmental issues across infancy, childhood, and adult life. Infant development will cover language development, attachment, perceptual development, and cognitive development. For childhood and adolescence, issues of problem solving are explored as is social development.

Concerning adult development, we focus on the influence of healthy ageing on the brain and cognition, pathological ageing processes (dementia), and successful ageing.

Theory pertaining to all aspects of the course will be presented and critiqued in light of available empirical research.

Practical Experience: Counselling Skills/Research

This class is intended to provide continuing practical experience in counselling skills and/or counselling research. There are two possibilities here: first, students can elect to volunteer in a community setting in which they can apply the counselling skills they learned in Year 3 (eg Samaritans, Childline).

Second, they can volunteer to work on a counselling research project, most commonly in the Research Clinic, using the research methods skills they learned in Years 2 & 3.

Honours Cognition

This class will introduce students to some of the core topics in face and object recognition, perception, language, thinking, learning and memory, and to explore the key theoretical debates within these areas.

Honours Psychobiology

The purpose of this class is to provide the opportunity for students to learn the basic principles of brain function, and to encourage students to address the implications of this understanding for their own view of how behaviour is generated.

This will allow students to develop a model of brain function that will allow a more critical evaluation of psychological theories in other areas of psychology.

Psychology

Dissertation in Psychology

The dissertation is an opportunity for you to undertake an original piece of research, closely supervised by a single member of staff. Dissertations can be of such high standards that they are subsequently published in peer-reviewed academic journals.

Semester 1 & 2 classes

Advanced Organisational Behaviour

Advanced Organisational Behaviour is an Honours year elective, which runs over two semesters, offered in the degree subject Human Resource Management (within the Department of Work, Employment and Organisation). It is also an elective in Psychology. There is no prerequisite for Psychology students and it is expected that students with no prior experience of HRM courses will be able to fully engage with this class. The class draws from organisational behaviour, work psychology and work sociology to explore current topics within work and employment, and the implications for people management.  

Psychology Work Placement

This class will support students' development in applying their knowledge and understanding of psychological theory and evidence in a work setting, as well as their ability to articulate the knowledge, understanding, and skills they have developed through the placement, their studies, and other extra-curricular activities.

The class aims to provide students with an opportunity to gain practical, work-based experience in an area that is professionally relevant to psychology. The placement experience should encourage the transfer of academic psychological knowledge, understanding, and subject-specific skills to an applied context. Students will also be supported in developing reflective and professional skills, and the ability to articulate these skills. This class is intended to support students' transition into employment and/or further study after graduation. It is also anticipated that there will be benefits to placement providers in the roles fulfilled by students, and in the longer term in supporting the development of the future workforce.

The placement involves completing a minimum of 60 hours of active engagement within a suitable organisation. An additional 50 hours has been added to account for travel time.

Students will be responsible for setting up a placement with an organisation relevant to their interests. We hope to provide students a list of organisations who have indicated a willingness to receive applications from students seeking a placement. 

In the assessment for the class, students are required to submit a 2000 word written assessment that covers:

  • An account of their role within the placement organisation, including a critical reflection on the student's professional practice in fulfilling the requirements of the role. The student will also relate back to the self-evaluation assessment written at the beginning of the placement;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the application of psychological theory and evidence relevant to the placement organisation and/or experience in the placement role;
  • Discussion of their personal and professional development, following the placement, with a view to their future development.

Elective

These classes are subject to change year-on-year and may not be the same for each academic year.

Cross-cultural Psychology

This optional class aims to help students gain an understanding of the ways in which human psychology is influenced by cultural context. This class builds upon your third-year psychology classes, attempting to expand the topics covered in these classes by emphasising the role culture plays in the mental life of human beings. This class will start with an introduction to cross-cultural psychology, discussing its various definitions and general theoretical orientations. Then, the class will explore the similarities and differences in social behaviour across cultures, and how culture influences people’s emotions and values. This class will also discuss intercultural contact (i.e., acculturation, cross-cultural competence).

This optional class will be delivered by a combination of lectures and seminars. An experiential/problem-based learning approach is adopted. Relevant theories and empirical research will be discussed, and students will have the opportunity to explore how the knowledge can be used to in real-world scenarios. Overall, this class will enhance students’ understanding of different perspectives on psychology and increase their awareness of cultural differences in psychology.

 

 

Psychology of Mental Health

Mental health problems are a growing public health concern worldwide, at both personal and societal levels. This class will explore the application of psychology to the field of mental health, with the consideration of the theoretical, practical and ethical underpinnings of the mental health field. The class will also explore approaches to psychological assessment, formulation and treatment that are commonly used in mental health practice.

  • Lectures will cover the following key areas:
  • Psychological assessment
  • Psychological formulation
  • Overview of most common mental health problems (e.g. depression, anxiety)
  • Clinical practice and psychological interventions
  • Positive mental health

Critical Thinking and Common-sense Reasoning

This class has two broad aims: 1) to provide students with an introduction to critical thinking and review some of the theoretical and empirical literature around critical thinking and epistemological thinking, and 2) to give students the opportunity to practice critical thinking and thereby develop and sharpen their skills in this important area. Literature on critical thinking and epistemological thinking will be reviewed, and both everyday aspects of critical thinking (such as interpretation of articles published in newspapers and on the world wide web) and more technical aspects (such as critiquing journal papers within psychology) will be covered. Following three lectures setting out the theoretical background, teaching will be workshop-based, in which students will work in tutorial groups engaging in critiquing exercises. Different kinds of articles will be jointly critiqued, beginning with ‘everyday’ materials such as newspaper opinion pieces, thence moving on to informal presentations of psychological material in the form of discussion articles published in magazine-style journals such as ‘The Psychologist’, and ultimately building up to the critique of published articles in psychology journals. This will therefore simultaneously broaden the students’ knowledge on a psychological topic of great practical significance (just how good are ordinary members of the public at thinking critically?) and at the same time help to develop their skills in a way that should positively impact their studies of psychology at Honours level.

Belief and Anomalistic Experience

This class introduces students to the scientific study of belief in religion and belief in / experience of ‘paranormal’ phenomenaThe content is not concerned with the veracity of experiences or beliefs but rather how psychology can measure associated variables, explain the formation and maintenance of beliefs and examine the effect that holding such beliefs or having such experiences can have, both physically and psychologicallyStudents will be expected to critically evaluate experimental methodology and theories of cognition in relation to the class content. 

 

Critical Review

This is a one semester class in which students will select an approved psychology topic for intensive, non-empirical study. Students will demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the conceptual and theoretical content of an area of psychology drawn from a list of approved topics. This class affords Honours students an opportunity to develop and demonstrate skills in literature search, information assimilation, evaluation and in depth critical analysis of a chosen topic. The class places emphasis on independent student learning. The course will help the student to develop critical writing skills over a period of time through independent writing and self-directed study. The aims are:

i. to develop an extensive in-depth knowledge of one key topic area in psychology.

ii. to develop critical thinking skills such as questioning the assumptions and conclusions of others and looking at alternative ways of dealing with questions, facts, and arguments.

iii. to develop and refine skills relating to the systematic acquisition of information.

iv. to develop and extend essay writing skills, including discussing and formulating arguments, summarizing, and presenting materials.

Introduction to Sleep Health

This class provides an introduction to the field of sleep health, which is a developing area of sleep psychology that focuses on the evaluation and treatment of sleep disorders by addressing behavioural, psychological, and physiological factors that interfere with sleep. Sleep disorders impair quality of life and contribute to physical and mental health problems. Despite this, they are an under-recognised and under-treated threat to public health. Sleep experts have long recognised the need for greater public awareness of the impact of poor sleep and the importance of promoting the evidence-base for appropriate assessment and treatment. This class will introduce students to the specialist, multidisciplinary area of sleep health with a very clear focus on insomnia disorder, the most common sleep disorder and the one of the most prevalent mental health complaints in Europe. 

 

The Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience of Face Recognition

In this class, we will cover the psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and real world applications of face perception and recognition. The class will cover current theory in relation to face recognition, but importantly we will also assess the critical use of faces in real world and forensic contexts. For example, faces are of critical importance in criminal identification in policing and the justice system (e.g. from CCTV, bystanders, juries and the victims of crime), and in the prevention of identity fraud (e.g. should we put our faces on our credit/debit cards?). There will also be a clinical aspect to this class as we’ll look at individual differences in face recognition, looking at patients with prosopagnosia and Metropolitan Police Super-recognisers. Each of these areas will be explored in detail, to show how our understanding of the science of face perception can inform us about our interest in, and reliance on, faces. 

 

 

Psychology and Ageing

It is understood that our population is ageing; for example, the fastest growing age group comprises those aged over 85 years. The potential for health, economic, and social burden due to ageing is therefore increasing. With a better understanding of ageing processes, the burden of an ageing population could be minimised, successful ageing and better quality of life promoted, and the contributions of older adults to society celebrated. Contemporary psychological theories of ageing will be presented from a number of perspectives, and the class will draw upon research that has used a variety of methodological approaches. Students will also be encouraged to engage with the material via a range of teaching methods, including traditional lecture content, video clips, and interactive tasks. Typically, we will address: theoretical and methodological approaches to studying psychology and ageing; cognitive ageing; lifestyle factors; emotion in older age; ageing in society, including stereotyping; ageing in the workplace/retirement; wisdom; the positive influences of older adults in society. Teaching delivery is anticipated to be via 5 on-campus sessions and an online peer review task.  

Psychological Assessment

This class will build upon knowledge developed in second (Cognition & Neuropsychology C8201) and third year level (Cognition C8304). Specifically, it will provide further understanding on how to apply principles of psychological assessment in broader contexts. The class will pursue three aims: 1) promote understanding and knowledge about the contributions and challenges of psychological assessment in various contexts and settings, 2) familiarise with aspects related to the selection of appropriate testing procedures and 3) the generation of hypotheses to guide such procedures and interpret their outcomes.

The class will offer a critical appreciation of a range of tests, procedures and techniques used to better understand a person’s psychological makeup and behaviour. Knowledge will be acquired on how such tests and procedures are used in experimental and applied settings. Learning will involve case discussions, discussion of commonly used tests, with students investigating cases and procedures. Students will develop an appreciation of the types of psychological testing.

Psychology of Physical Activity

The aim of the class is to facilitate the development of knowledge and understanding of theories and evidence-based research in relation to the psychology of physical activity. This class will provide opportunities for students to develop their critical evaluation skills of theory and research and to gain experience of measurement and behaviour change techniques in this area. The aim is also to give students the opportunity to apply what they have learned to a ‘real-world’ case study by implementing a behaviour change intervention to increase active behaviours.  This class extends material covered in previous years in biological, social, cognitive and health psychology but is applied to physical activity behaviour. Level 4 classes are very popular with students as they cover focussed, specialist topics and staff expertise.   

Evolutionary Approaches to Human Mate Preferences

This lecture series will critically examine the contribution that evolutionary theories have made to our understanding of human mate preferences. It will cover fundamental questions in the area, such as how mate preferences are shaped by environmental and hormonal factors, and will have a strong focus on recent methodological and theoretical controversies in the literature. 

Theory and practice of learning and cognition

Cognitive Psychology (CP) is central to the understanding processes that are required for memory, attention, and learning. It can also provide insights into cognitive conditions that affect how people function and behave. CP underpins all aspects of psychological theory and practice (synonymous with developmental, social, educational and neuro psychology). The class will explore and critically examine key learning theory and consider transference and application from theory to real life contexts.  

Considering Sleep Through the Behavioural Lens

Sleep is a multidisciplinary field and is relevant for a variety of medical fields such as neurology, respiratory medicine, cardiology, and psychiatry. The focus thereby lies on the physiological aspects of sleep, as well as the organic sleep disorders such as sleep apnoea or narcolepsy. However, sleep is also a behaviour, and examining sleep through the behavioural lens has implications for the field of psychology at the individual and also the public health level. If we can understand how to change sleep behaviour, we can initiate change in the individuals and the public's health and wellbeing. In this class, we will explore the importance of examining sleep at the behavioural level, which can be modified to improve health and wellbeing. 

Neuropsychology of Ageing and Dementia

The class will offer you the opportunity to acquire an in-depth understanding of the theories and empirical data that are relevant within the field of neuropsychology of ageing and dementia. It will cover the differences between normal and pathological decline in old age and will provide information on the neuropsychological profiles and pathologies which characterize different forms of dementia. It will provide you with a solid foundation in neuropsychology. You will learn to identify the features which can aid early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of the dementias (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, Vascular dementia and Lewy body dementias). You will become familiar with how different aspects of cognition are distributed within the brain and will be aware of the consequences of impairment.

Different methodologies that are used for the study of the dementias will also be explored (e.g. neuropsychological assessment, functional and structural neuroimaging) and you will learn to critically evaluate the benefits and pitfalls of each method.
Overall, the class will provide you with key knowledge that will be relevant for the study of neurological conditions, for health-based research more broadly, and relevant should you choose to work in academia, healthcare or other industries (linked to older adults or neurological populations).

Study abroad

International Work Placement

This class is an option which is available to a restricted number of students who'll apply to take part. It involves a placement with a European University partner working in a research team during the summer between years 3 and 4. Additional assessment is to be completed during semester 1 of year 4.

The teaching staff were brilliant at introducing the cohort to new topics, themes and ideas in psychology and allowing us to cultivate our own critical approach to existing theory and research. The use of group work made our learning a team journey and hearing different perspectives sped up our knowledge and understanding.
Sarah-Louise Watson

Learning & teaching

The psychology course content is primarily lecture-based, supported by tutorials, laboratory practicals and supervised research work.

The counselling part is delivered using a combination of large group formats (lecture/workshop/group work) and small group formats (tutor groups/skills practice) plus online learning inputs. Students will be expected to supplement class time with directed and self-directed learning. Students will also be required to conduct a listening session that demonstrates their listening skill with someone in the community.

Assessment

Assessment methods include:

  • written exams
  • multiple choice exams
  • reports
  • presentation skills
  • dissertation
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Entry requirements

Required subjects are shown in brackets.

Highers

Standard entry requirements*:

  • 1st sitting: AAAA 
  • 2nd sitting: AAAAB

(including English plus at least one other social science subject from those listed under preferred subjects below; plus National 5 Maths or Application of Maths at B to C.)

Minimum entry requirements**:

  • 1st sitting: AABB 
  • 2nd sitting: AABBB

(including English at B plus at least one other social science subject from those listed under preferred subjects below; plus National 5 Maths or Application of Maths at C.)

Preferred subjects

  • Classical Studies
  • Drama
  • Economics
  • Gaelic
  • Geography
  • History
  • Modern Studies
  • Modern Language (German/French/Spanish/Italian)
  • Philosophy
  • Politics
  • Psychology
  • Religious, Moral and Philosophical Studies
  • Sociology
  • Biology
  • Human Biology
A Levels

ABB-BBB

International Baccalaureate

Year 1 entry: 32-30

Irish Leaving Certificate

Two H2 passes and three H3 passes including English

 

International students

View the entry requirements for your country.

Deferred Entry

Not normally accepted

*Standard entry requirements

Offers are made in accordance with specified entry requirements although admission to undergraduate programmes is considered on a competitive basis and entry requirements stated are normally the minimum level required for entry.

Whilst offers are made primarily on the basis of an applicant meeting or exceeding the stated entry criteria, admission to the University is granted on the basis of merit, and the potential to succeed. As such, a range of information is considered in determining suitability.

In exceptional cases, where an applicant does not meet the competitive entry standard, evidence may be sought in the personal statement or reference to account for performance which was affected by exceptional circumstances, and which in the view of the judgement of the selector would give confidence that the applicant is capable of completing the programme of study successfully.

**Higher subject list

  • Classical Studies
  • Drama/Economics
  • French
  • Gaelic
  • Geography
  • German
  • History
  • Italian
  • Modern Studies
  • Philosophy
  • Politics
  • Psychology
  • Religious Moral & Philosophical Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish

***Minimum entry requirements

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

Contextual Admissions for Widening Access

We want to increase opportunities for people from every background.

Strathclyde selects our students based on merit, potential, and the ability to benefit from the education we offer. We look for more than just your grades. We consider the circumstances of your education and will make lower offers to certain applicants as a result.

Find out if you can benefit from this type of offer.

University preparation programme for international students

We offer international students (non-UK/Ireland) who do not meet the academic entry requirements for an undergraduate degree at Strathclyde the option of completing an Undergraduate Foundation Programme in Business and Social Sciences at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre. ​

Upon successful completion, you can progress to your chosen degree at the University of Strathclyde.

International students

We've a thriving international community with students coming here to study from over 140 countries across the world. Find out all you need to know about studying in Glasgow at Strathclyde and hear from students about their experiences.

Visit our international students' section

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Fees & funding

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Fees may be subject to updates to maintain accuracy. Tuition fees will be notified in your offer letter.

All fees are in £ sterling, unless otherwise stated, and may be subject to revision.

Annual revision of fees

Students on programmes of study of more than one year should be aware that tuition fees are revised annually and may increase in subsequent years of study. Annual increases will generally reflect UK inflation rates and increases to programme delivery costs.

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Scotland
  • 2024/25: TBC
  • 2023/24: £1,820

Fees for students who meet the relevant residence requirements in Scotland are subject to confirmation by the Scottish Funding Council. Scottish undergraduate students undertaking an exchange for a semester/year will continue to pay their normal tuition fees at Strathclyde and will not be charged fees by the overseas institution.

England, Wales & Northern Ireland

£9,250

Assuming no change in fees policy over the period, the total amount payable by undergraduate students will be capped. For students commencing study in 2024/25, this is capped at £27,750 (with the exception of the MPharm and integrated Masters programmes). MPharm students pay £9,250 for each of the four years. Students studying on integrated Masters degree programmes pay an additional £9,250 for the Masters year with the exception of those undertaking a full-year industrial placement where a separate placement fee will apply.

International

£19,600

University preparation programme fees

International students can find out more about the costs and payments of studying a university preparation programme at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre.

Available scholarships

We have a wide range of scholarships available. Have a look at our scholarship search to find a scholarship.

Additional costs

PVG scheme

Must pay for own PVG (£59) if 4th Year placement requires one but students can choose placements without this requirement.

Visa & immigration

International students may have associated visa and immigration costs. Please see student visa guidance for more information.

Please note: All fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

How can I fund my studies?

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Students from Scotland

Fees for students who meet the relevant residence requirements in Scotland, you may be able to apply to the Student Award Agency Scotland (SAAS) to have your tuition fees paid by the Scottish government. Scottish students may also be eligible for a bursary and loan to help cover living costs while at University.

For more information on funding your studies have a look at our University Funding page.

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Students from England, Wales & Northern Ireland

We have a generous package of bursaries on offer for students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales:

You don’t need to make a separate application for these. When your place is confirmed at Strathclyde, we’ll assess your eligibility. Have a look at our scholarship search for any more funding opportunities.

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International Students

We have a number of scholarships available to international students. Take a look at our scholarship search to find out more.

Glasgow is Scotland's biggest & most cosmopolitan city

Our campus is based right in the very heart of Glasgow. We're in the city centre, next to the Merchant City, both of which are great locations for sightseeing, shopping and socialising alongside your studies.

Life in Glasgow

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Careers

This course provides students interested in a more applied focus to their psychology degree with foundation training in counselling skills and theory.

Such a background will allow graduates to:

  • proceed to postgraduate education in Psychotherapy/Counselling or Counselling Psychology, or Psychology
  • enter the workplace in support work or other roles that require basic psychological helping skills, referred to as 'embedded counselling' roles

Students who gain a Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society will be eligible for research assistant and assistant psychology roles or access to further professional training in psychology.

Chat to a student ambassador

If you want to know more about what it’s like to be a Humanities & Social Sciences student at the University of Strathclyde, a selection of our current students are here to help!

Our Unibuddy ambassadors can answer all the questions you might have about courses and studying at Strathclyde, along with offering insight into their experiences of life in Glasgow and Scotland.

Chat to a student ambassador
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Apply

Start date:

Psychology & Counselling (1 year entry)

Start date: Sep 2024

Psychology & Counselling (1 year entry)

full-time
Start date: Sep 2024

UCAS Applications

Apply through UCAS if you are a UK applicant. International applicants may apply through UCAS if they are applying to more than one UK University.

Apply now

Direct Applications

Our Direct applications service is for international applicants who wish to apply to Strathclyde University at this time.

Apply now
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Contact us

Prospective student enquiries

Telephone: +44 (0) 141 444 8600

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