Physics UCP Optics

Physics Research News

Strathclyde researchers integrate optical devices made of multiple materials onto single chip

High-accuracy integration of photonic devices from multiple-materials in close proximity offers unique possibilities of fabricating chip-based systems of more compact designs using optical devices.

September 2021

Memory devices on satellites to enable the quantum internet

The installation of memory and ‘repeater’ devices in space, to enable use of the quantum internet, have been proposed in research by the University of Strathclyde and an international collaboration.

September 2021

Alessandro Rossi interviewed in Nature magazine

In an article in Nature magazine Alessandro Rossi talks about his research across Strathclyde and the National Physical Laboratory, and the challenges of bringing together quantum physics with metrology.

August 2021

Strathclyde Physics researcher receives Royal Academy of Engineering Fellowship

Dr James McGilligan is one of 16 recipients of Research Fellowships, announced by the Royal Academy of Engineering (RAEng) to mark the programme’s 20th anniversary. His project will investigate microfabricating chip-scale atomic platforms for quantum navigators and the development of highly accurate atomic clocks.

August 2021

Two Strathclyde Academics in IOP Applied Physics Journal Emerging Leaders List

Dr Alessandro Rossi and Dr Fabien Massabuau have been named as emerging leaders by Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics (JPhysD) in a recent Special Issue.

August 2021

Scotland’s last Auschwitz survivor leaves £500,000 gift to fund quantum research

Judith Rosenberg – who died in January aged 98 and who was Scotland’s last Auschwitz survivor – left in her Will a legacy gift to the University of Strathclyde. Her donation will go towards the creation of the Harold and Judith Rosenberg Chair in Quantum Technology and the Harold and Judith Rosenberg Quantum Technology Laboratoriesin their honour.

July 2021

First experimental observations of Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking of temporal cavity solitons in Kerr ring resonators

A collaboration between The University of Auckland (New Zealand), the Dodd-Walls Centre for Photonic and Quantum Technologies, the ICB laboratory in Dijon (France), the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), and the University of Strathclyde has led to the first experimental observations of the Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking (SSB) of temporal cavity solitons in Kerr ring resonators.

July 2021

The paradox of a free-electron laser without the laser: a new source of coherent radiation

A new way of producing coherent light in the ultra-violet spectral region, which points the way to developing brilliant table-top x-ray sources, has been produced in research led at the University of Strathclyde. Scientists have developed a type of ultra-short wavelength coherent light source that does not require laser action to produce coherence.

July 2021

Inspiring women celebrated in naming of Strathclyde’s new Learning & Teaching Building

The University of Strathclyde will honour three prominent women through the naming of its new Learning and Teaching Building. The former Colville building will be named the Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell Wing in recognition of the renowned astrophysicist, first woman president of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and of the Institute of Physics, and honorary graduate of Strathclyde.

July 2021

New source of gravitational waves discovered

Scientists have picked up the ripples in space-time caused by the death spiral of two celestial juggernauts – a neutron star and a black hole – for the first time.

June 2021

Fast Scrambling of Quantum Information in Atom Arrays

Understanding how information spreads in microscopic systems is important across different areas of physics, ranging from fundamental understanding of the behaviour of black holes, to the engineering and implementation of quantum computers. In a new paper in Physical Review Letters, Tomohiro Hashizume, Prof. Andrew Daley and collaborators have shown how a fast scrambler for quantum information could be built in the laboratory.

June 2021

Multiple Self-Organized Phases and Spatial Solitons in Cold Atoms Mediated by Optical Feedback

A Strathclyde-based team of researchers within the European training network ColOpt has published in PRL results that provide new insight into the physics of structural transitions and self-organisation in cold and ultracold atomic gases, and similar spontaneous symmetry breaking phenomena in photonics systems.

June 2021

A new type of miniature plasma particle accelerator

An international collaboration, involving the University of Strathclyde, combined two kinds of plasma accelerators to achieve a rapid energy gain of electrons in only a few millimetres. The accelerator could offer a compact source of high-quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray generation, material science and biomedical research.

May 2021

Promotions

The Department congratulates Alan Phelps on being made an Emeritus Professor, Antonio Hurtado on his promotion to Reader, Alessandro Rossi on his promotion to Senior Lecturer, Robert Cameron on being appointed to a Proleptic Lectureship, and Grace Manahan on her promotion to Research Fellow.

May 2021

Quantum encryption scheme to be tested on satellite

A new scheme for using quantum technology to encrypt messages with the aim of a secure global communication network, is to be tested on a satellite, in a programme involving the University of Strathclyde.

May 2021

Researchers create one-dimensional lattice for electrons

A collaboration between experimentalists at the University of Pittsburgh and theorists at the University of Strathclyde, published in Nature Physics, has directly engineered and studied the behaviour of electrons in the Kronig-Penney model within a programmable oxide material.

April 2021

Head of Department joins Scotland’s National Academy

The Department is pleased to congratulate Professor Paul McKenna on his election as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

March 2021

Increasing the accuracy of atomic clocks

Innovative techniques in the miniaturisation of optical atomic clocks are being developed in research involving the University of Strathclyde. Dr Paul Griffin, the University’s lead researcher for the project, said: “This project is tackling head on the difficult problem of taking research-grade technology from the laboratory and into practicable and scalable quantum devices.”

March 2021

New technologies for investigating diseases in the deep brain

Researchers at the University of Strathclyde are part of an international study creating new photonic tools for accessing the deep brain, for the study and treatment of neurological diseases. Strathclyde is the sole UK participant in DEEPER (Deep Brain Photonic Tools for Cell-Type Specific Targeting of Neural Diseases), which is investigating the deep-brain alterations underlying the origin of neurological and psychiatric diseases.

March 2021

High energy radiotherapy could ‘paint’ tumours to avoid harming healthy tissue

A radiotherapy technique which ‘paints’ tumours by targeting them precisely, and avoiding healthy tissue, has been devised in research led by the University of Strathclyde. Researchers used a magnetic lens to focus a Very High Electron Energy (VHEE) beam to a zone of a few millimetres. Concentrating the radiation into a small volume of high dose will enable it to be rapidly scanned across a tumour, while controlling its intensity.

February 2021

Cockcroft Institute awarded more than £11 million to boost Accelerator Research

The Cockcroft Institute (CI), a partnership between the Universities of Lancaster, Liverpool, Manchester and Strathclyde, and the Science & Technology Facilities Council (STFC), has been awarded more than £11 million for R&D into accelerator science and technology.

February 2021

OSA Award for Strathclyde Professor

The Department of Physics congratulates Prof. Martin Dawson on being named as the 2021 recipient of The Optical Society’s (OSA) Nick Holonyak Jr Award. This award is presented annually to an individual who has made significant contributions to optics based on semiconductor devices and materials.  Martin is the first UK-based recipient and receives the award “for wide-ranging contributions to the development and application of III-V semiconductor devices, especially including gallium nitride micro-LEDs and optically-pumped semiconductor lasers.”

February 2021

Alternation of Symmetry Breaking in Photonic Micro-resonators

An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, the Universities of Strathclyde and Heriot-Watt and the UK’s National Physical Laboratory has discovered a new mechanism for optical pulses where two counter-propagating beams in a micro-resonator switch dominance hundreds of thousands of times in a single second.

February 2021

New Quantum Theory demonstrates Laser Thresholds for Nano-lasers

For the past three decades mystery and debate have surrounded the existence of a threshold (the point at which a light emitting device becomes a laser) in nano-lasers, even leading many to think that there are “thresholdless” laser devices. However, thanks to the development of a new quantum laser theory we now have the answer: thresholds do exist for nano-lasers.

February 2021

Strathclyde leads team advancing 3D imaging deep in biological tissue

Dr Lucia Caspani is leading a team developing a new technique enabling 3D imaging of even the most fragile and delicate specimens. The project has received a grant from QuantIC, the UK Quantum Technology Hub in Quantum Enhanced Imaging, the first award to be made from the Hub’s Accelerated Development Fund.

February 2021

Polarisation Domain Walls in Optical Ring Resonators

A collaboration of researchers from New Zealand and the European Union has observed for the first time domain walls separating two regions of light with orthogonal polarizations in a fibre ring resonator.

February 2021

Quantum project launched to solve dark matter mysteries

International research aimed at transforming understanding of the universe and answering key questions on the nature of dark matter.

January 2021

Triple success for Strathclyde in new format EPSRC research call

Dr Sebastian van de Linde's project "What do membranes really look like? New approaches to 3D multiplexed imaging of the cell surface" is one of three University projects to have been selected for funding from the New Horizons call by EPSRC (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council).

January 2021

CBE for Strathclyde professor in New Year’s Honour List

Emeritus Professor Allister Ferguson has been awarded a CBE in the New Year’s Honours List for services to science and industry.

January 2021