Students work with a 3D printer.

MSc/PgDipProduct Design

Why this course?

This course aims to provide graduates not only with enhanced skills in creative product design, but a deeper understanding of the cognitive, cultural and physical needs of users that inform new product design and development.

It will provide a thorough training in design theories and methods including product aesthetics and human-centred design, and the utilisation of advanced design techniques in digital modelling and physical rapid prototyping of design solutions.

The course will appeal to graduates of courses in industrial/product design or innovation-related courses who wish to influence future thinking and practice design.

Industrial Experience

During the programme, you'll undertake an individual and group project.

For group projects, you'll have the opportunity to work with fellow students and an industrial client to address a practical problem. You'll gain direct industry experience to add to your CV, develop skills, manage a project through to completion and practice working in a multidisciplinary group preparing you for collaborative work throughout your future career.

We work with on average 50 organisations per year and previous students have worked with organisations such as:

2018/19

  • Adidas
  • Airlie Ice Cream
  • Drink Baotic
  • Promedics Orthopaedics
  • Rolls Royce
  • Spirit AeroSystems (Europe), Inc
  • Unilever

2017/18

  • Adidas
  • Alexander Dennis
  • Belle Bridal
  • Chivas Brothers Ltd
  • HATSUN Agro Products (India)
  • Johnstons of Elgin
  • Terex Trucks

2016/17

  • Adidas
  • Allied Vehicles
  • Jaguar Land Rover
  • NCR
  • RSPB Scotland
  • Weir Group
  • WEST Brewery

Facilities

The Department of Design, Manufacture & Engineering Management is well equipped with state-of-the-art tools to help design, prototype, manufacture and perform research on a broad range of items.

We use our skills and equipment on a number of commercial and research projects. We have various workshops to assist us in this work, including:

  • rapid prototyping
  • virtual prototyping
  • reverse engineering
  • mechatronics labs

We have one of the UK’s only digital design suites to combine virtual and physical design and prototyping.

Find out more about our other facilities.

As a Masters student in the department you'll also have access to a private postgraduate student community area, including collaboration work areas and social areas, as well as a kitchen.

Studying Product Design with us

Studying this degree within our Department of Design, Manufacture & Engineering Management provides you with access to some of the leading academics in the whole product development life cycle, learning from their time in industry, current research projects and advancements in those fields.

We are the only department in the UK that combines end-to-end multidisciplinary expertise from creative design, through engineering design, manufacture and management of the entire system. This is more commonly split between art school and engineering faculties, however we can provide you with a broader understanding of the overall process, and expertise in each area, all in the one department.

Accreditation

Accreditation by a professional body is a mark of assurance that programmes meet the standards set by a profession. It's an accepted and rigorous process that commands respect both in the UK and internationally and helps students, their parents and advisers choose quality degree programmes.  It also confers market advantage to graduates from accredited programmes, both when they are seeking employment and also when they decide to seek professional qualification. Some employers require graduation from an accredited programme as a minimum qualification.

Our MSc Product Design programme has been awarded academic accreditation from two institutes. This demonstrates the degree meets the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC) as outlined by the Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes (AHEP).

This accreditation is achieved through a panel of trained and expert accreditors looking closely at our programme’s content and delivery, including its relevance, coherence, challenge, assessment, staffing, quality assurance and resources.

The accreditors also monitor that the programme is continually improving and in line with the latest best practice, providing assurance to our students that they are getting a relevant and quality degree.

Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET)

Accreditation has been awarded for this programme from the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) on behalf of the Engineering Council as meeting the requirements for further learning for registration as a Chartered Engineer. Candidates must hold a CEng accredited BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree to comply with full CEng registration requirements.

Gaining accreditation isn’t just about ensuring the quality of our programmes, it also benefits you as a student. For example, being accredited by IET means that our graduates will benefit from a more straightforward process when applying for professional registration. Also, being part of an IET accredited programme is part of the eligibility criteria for many IET Scholarships and Prizes, including the Diamond Jubilee, Belling and BP Scholarships and IET Grants.

Institution of Engineering Designers (IED)

Accreditation has been awarded for this programme from the Institution of Engineering Designers (IED) on behalf of the Engineering Council as meeting the requirements for further learning for registration as a Chartered Engineer. Candidates must hold a CEng accredited BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree to comply with full CEng registration requirements.

Accreditation by IED means students would automatically be offered free IED student membership for the duration of their studies, would receive a bi-monthly journal ‘Engineering Designer’ in which they can submit articles for print and their final year projects would be eligible for entry into the IED Student Prize competition held annually.  These prizes are prestigious and are only awarded for outstanding engineering design projects.  Student members can also place their CV on the IED website and have access to the Job Board which gives details of current vacancies within the field of Engineering Design.  In addition, students will also be able to use the IED’s on-line CPD system.

Staff

You'll learn from leading experts in the field of product design. All our staff have great experience working with industry, product development and improvement projects.

Staff include:

  • Professor Alex Duffy
    Professor Duffy is a leading expert in systems design, coordination of systems engineering projects, performance improvement and strategic development. Editor of the Journal of Engineering Design and past President of the Design Society.
  • Dr Anup Nair
    Dr Nair’s overarching research theme is of technology driven innovations within organisations, particularly high value manufacturing organisations and strategic technology management.
  • Dr Andrew Wodehouse
    Dr Wodehouse’s research addresses the themes of product, process and people: the individual product experience in terms of user interaction; group collaboration in the design and delivery of products; and the sociological factors that drive product innovation and lead to commercial success.
  • Mr Richard Adams
    Mr Adams has worked internationally and designed everything from transportation to high technological medical products for the National Health Service. His passion and focus is on human centred design approaches to help companies be more people facing.

Course content

180 credits for a Masters.

Compulsory classes

Product Modelling & Visualisation (10 credits)

This module aims to enable students to understand the concepts of virtual product modelling and techniques used to visualise products before they are fully designed and manufactured.

The module covers: an introduction to basic modelling, visualisation and evaluation techniques creating models, parts and assemblies; The representations that underpin modern CAED systems (wireframe, surface, CSG and BRep), basic computer graphics (homogeneous transformations), data exchange, information integration, product data management, economics of CAD/CAM systems (cost breakdown, potential benefits, improving cost/benefit ratio), basic systems selection and justification and organisational impact and system management.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to use a commercially available CAD system by creating 3-D product models and appropriate visualisations for evaluation
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of product modelling and visualisation by demonstrating an ability to provide 2D/3D part and assembly drawings, and a variety of sectioned/dimensioned views of part/assembly models
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of product evaluation techniques by identifying and describing suitable product evaluation techniques such as FEA and utilise for evaluation
  • describe and discuss the functionality and benefits that CAED systems can bring to product development by identifying and justifying a CAED solution for an industrial problem

Assessment and feedback is in the form of coursework (100%).

Design Methods (10 credits)

This module aims to enable students to select and apply appropriate design methods as a part of the design process.

The selection and use of design methods within the context of modern design practices and the new product development process will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on recently developed product independent design methods and their application within industrial environments. Specific topics include the design process management frameworks, user understanding methods, product specification methods, creative methods, design for production and cost methods, design for safety and reliability methods and design for the environment.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • select and apply appropriate design methods for a design project to solve product design oriented problems by understanding specific design methods and recognising their strengths and weaknesses
  • integrate appropriate design methods into a design process to ensure fitness of purpose of all aspects of the problem/context by demonstrating how manufacture, costing, environmental, disposal and customer needs may be addressed in the design process through design methods
  • analyse literature sources to identify design methods suitable for a particular situation by undertaking a critical literature review to identify current developments in design methods in research and practice and synthesise the results of the literature review into a report

Assessment and feedback will be in the form of an exam (60%), a report (35%) and a presentation (5%).

Global Design (10 credits)

This module aims to prepare students with the knowledge, skills and experience to become competent members of global/distributed design teams.

It covers the nature of distributed design, including: Benefits and issues relating to distributed design, design methodologies; Extended supply chains (design and manufacture); Distributed team structures; Comparison of co-located and distributed design teams; design to manufacture, distributed design expertise, different distributed design scenarios, e.g. cross-site, cross-company, national, international, etc.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of distributed design by explaining the concepts of distributed design engineering by discussing how the benefits and issues related to distributed design compare to those of co-located design
  • demonstrate understanding of the management of distributed design projects by describing management tools and techniques for successfully managing distributed design, applying these tools and techniques to carry out distributed design project work and showing how these tools and techniques can overcome issues relating to distributed design
  • describe appropriate technology and how it can be used to support distributed design by applying the use of technology to successfully carry out distributed design project work

Assessment and feedback is in the form of coursework submissions (70%) and project presentations (30%).

Management of Innovation (10 credits)

This module focuses on innovation implementation. It integrates insights from research and strategy, management control, innovation and technology and organisational behaviour to consider how innovations can be managed. Three main challenges to innovation are explored: resources, organisation and management mechanisms.

The module covers: Management of Innovation including an overview of what makes innovation management complex and three models for how these complexities can be managed; Introduction to Model S for small initiatives; Introduction to Model R for Repeatable Innovations; Introduction to Model C for all other innovations; Build the Team: An Overview and Division of Labour; Assembling the dedicated team and managing the partnership; Creating the Innovation Strategy; Enabling, running and evaluating Disciplined Experimentations.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of managing the innovation process within organisations
  • demonstrate how to integrate business strategy with innovating strategies
  • develop the ability to critically assess concepts, tools and techniques of managing innovation for both stable and turbulent environments
  • develop and contextualise an approach for analysis for a specific case
  • develop an innovation roadmap for strategic purposes

Assessment and feedback is in the form of a group presentation (40%) and an individual final report (60%).

Design Form & Aesthetics (10 credits)

This module aims to develop a theoretical and practical understanding of design form and aesthetics.

The module covers:

  • traditions, evolution and trends in design form and aesthetics in the context of industrial design
  • principles and practices: form; colour; surface and texture
  • designing form and aesthetics in practice including concept sketching and imaging - advanced freehand sketching, digital tablet sketching, transferring sketching to CAD
  • design refinement and digital modelling (Rhino 3D) including surface modelling and curvature, NURBS surface modelling, visual curvature analysis, basic rendering visualisation
  • communicating form and aesthetics - techniques for presenting form and aesthetic ideas and concepts to users, development teams and clients

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • apply design form and aesthetics skills and techniques in project work with a focus on form, colour, surface and texture through the use of freehand sketching, digital and physical modelling. Demonstrate an ability to produce freehand sketches, digital and physical models which clearly show application of form, colour, surface and texture techniques
  • demonstrate an understanding of a range of methods for communicating design and form approaches (verbal, graphic and prototype)

Assessment and feedback is in the form of preparing a Design Folio. This will include a mid-project design folio presentation (30%), a final presentation of visuals, prototypes etc. and critique of project work (30%) as well as submission of the design folio detailing stages and outputs of the design process (40%).

Human Centred Design (10 credits)

This module aims to provide students with theoretical and practical understanding of Human Centred Design (HCD).

The module covers:

  • the evolution of HCD and its various approaches including ergonomics, cognition, user-centered design, people-centered design, design emotion, participatory design, co-design, design ethnography and design anthropology
  • ontological and epistemological perspectives and assumptions in HCD such as different ‘world-views’ of people, objects and interaction
  • research methods for HCD including interviews, focus groups, lab experiments, participant and non-participant observation, critical making/‘provotyping’

At the end of the module students will be able to:

  • apply appropriate HCD tools, methods and operations in design practice
  • select and provide rationale for appropriate HCD approaches within a variety of scenarios
  • apply and communicate HCD approaches to a research and design project with tangible demonstration of methods in process and practice
  • communicate HCD approaches verbally to an audience to convey its value within product development and innovation
  • communicate design output visually through the documentation of research, process rationale and solution in design folio

Assessment and feedback is in the form of a project progress presentation in class (30%) and submission of project (70%).

Design Management (10 credits)

This module provides a structured introduction to the Design Management process, issues and tools.

The module covers: Different approaches and aspects to design development including concurrent engineering, team engineering, product management, design management, distributed design, and decision support, the design activity, methods and process models including role of the market, specification, conceptual and detail design, basic team and management structures (organisation), key issues related to design complexities and the key aspects of design coordination, design performance and innovation.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • appreciate and understand the role of design within an organisation and the organisational structures required for effective design by articulating the impact of early product delivery with regards to quality, cost and market sales and by describing the different main organisational structures and their impact on the design activity
  • appreciate the role of design models, approaches and methods by appreciating of the different strengths and weaknesses of models, approaches and methods
  • appreciate the role of innovation in design and know how to measure design performance by highlighting the key factors in design performance and how they relate as well as the nature and different types of innovation in relation to design

Assessment and feedback is in the form of coursework (100%), there will be no exam.

Postgraduate Group Project (40 credits)

This module aims for students to integrate and apply design, manufacturing and engineering management knowledge and skills to an industry based product and process development project and to develop project management skills.

The module consists of a team-based industrial project where an outline project brief is set by an industrial client. The team is expected to manage all aspects of the project through to a finished solution. This can be a product, system or process depending on the nature of the project. Teams meet with academic staff and industrial clients regularly through the project.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • have in-depth understanding and knowledge of products and management practices in industry
  • critically review and evaluate products and management practices of the particular company and the business impact of proposed solution
  • demonstrate knowledge and ability in applying and using various analysis and modelling tools and techniques
  • demonstrate project planning and management, presentation, consulting and team working skills
  • plan, control and lead an industrial project from inception to completion
  • evidence achieving deliverables which meet the client company requirements

Assessment and feedback includes a project report, a presentation to the client and any other deliverables specified in the project brief.

Postgraduate Individual Project (60 credits)

The aim of the individual project is to allow students to combine the skills learned in other modules of the course and apply them within a significant project in a specific area of design, manufacture, or engineering management. This will be achieved through students carrying out work into a particular topic relating to their course and preparing a dissertation that documents the project.

On completion of the module the student is expected to be able to:

  • define a valid project in a cutting-edge field of study relevant to the student’s degree – with an appropriate methodology and work plan for the project
  • plan, manage and complete project, involving where appropriate technical analysis and independent critical thinking. This involves giving a thorough, logical and critical review of the subject matter; using appropriate tools, processes and levels of analysis in the project and applying project management techniques to manage a successful project
  • document their project using suitable presentation techniques (such as language, figures, writing, layout, structure etc.); showing clear evidence of the value of the project and its outcomes and describing the project with clarity

Based on the work of a project, a student will submit an individual dissertation that will account for 90% of the final mark for the class. An interim project justification report will account for the remaining 10% of the mark.

Optional classes

Pick one from the following list:

Sustainability (10 credits)

This module covers one of the major challenges of modern industry which is to address the need for sustainable product development and manufacturing. International legislation and increasing costs of fiscal instruments such as the landfill tax now aim to force producers to reduce the environmental impacts of their products and processes.

Accelerating globalisation and industrialisation continues to exacerbate complexity of sustainability. Whilst manufacturers are constantly required to lower their costs and maintain their competitiveness, legislations require them to look at lifecycle costs.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • understand the importance of sustainable product development and sustainable manufacturing and how to establish competitive advantage
  • describe End-of-Life issues and critically discuss the place of reuse processes in Sustainable Design and Manufacturing, as well as identifying the various reuse processes, defining and differentiating them and critically discussing their particular advantages and disadvantages in sustainable manufacturing
  • identify the product features and characteristics that facilitate and hinder product recovery and be able to technically analyse products’ sustainability and redesign them for enhanced sustainability
  • identify the fundamental “building blocks” of LCA and describe/illustrate the use of LCA in lifecycle decision making, as well as describing Biomimicry use in product design

Assessment and feedback will be in the form of coursework (100%) including discussion forums, group seminars and a position paper.

People, Organisation & Technology (10 credits)

This module aims to introduce students to the 'softer' aspects of engineering management. Given some key organisational and technological issues, the main focus is to examine the relationship between “human” elements and change management from an engineering-oriented perspective.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • discuss key issues in organisation and technology by critically defining and discussing key characteristics of an organisation and evaluating the impact of technology on the workplace of the future
  • understand modern people management concepts and practices by evaluating leadership and motivation techniques using analytical approaches and will demonstrate critical understanding of the role of people in a modern organisation
  • identify the challenges and consequences of change, including defining and discussing the skills required to handle organisational change and the drivers and obstacles towards organisational change
  • understand the impact of organisational and technological issues on people when managing changes. This includes identifying drivers and obstacles from organisational, technological and human perspectives using analytical methods as well as creating strategies to help implement changes

Assessment and feedback is given in the form of:

  • group presentations and a group report
  • an individual essay
Strategic Technology Management (10 credits)

This module aims to provide a series of strategic frameworks for managing high-technology businesses. The main focus is on the acquisition of a set of powerful analytical tools which are critical for the development of a technology strategy as an integral part of business strategy. These tools can provide a guiding framework for deciding which technologies to invest in, how to structure those investments and how to anticipate and respond to the behaviour of competitors, suppliers, and customers. The course should be of particular interest to those interested in managing a business for which technology is likely to play a major role, and to those interested in consulting or venture capital.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the role and importance of technology in business strategy formulation process
  • Develop the ability to critically assess concepts, tools and techniques of managing technology for both stable and turbulent business environments
  • Evaluate complexity and develop appropriate technology strategy models for specific cases

Grades will be determined by class participation assessed through four two-page papers on case studies, which may be written in groups of 4 people (40%), and an individual final technology strategy report based on an in-depth exploration of technology strategy in an assigned industry (60%). There is no final exam.

Supply Chain Operations (10 credits)

This module aims to provide students with an in-depth knowledge and understanding of those key concepts, methods, tools and techniques that are fundamental to effective and efficient running of supply chain operations from suppliers’ suppliers to customers’ customers.

The module covers an Introduction to supply chain operations; Demand management; Master planning; Material management; Capacity management; Inventory management; Distribution management; and Case studies.

On completion the participants will be able to design and manage operational supply chain planning, scheduling and controlling systems for complex and disparate operations. In particular, students will:

  • Understand the basics of supply chain operations in relation to planning, operating, scheduling and controlling, including knowledge of supply chain operation practices (demand management, master planning, material management, capacity management and inventory management); understanding the impact of supply chain operation practices within commercial and social contexts and global trends in supply chain operation practices
  • Identify and assess different methods, tools and techniques for managing plans, operations and materials of end-to-end supply chains
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply those methods, tools and techniques in different contexts, including manufacturing and service sectors, with a critical awareness of drivers and obstacles in real life and the ability to produce sensible solutions to overcome them

Assessment and feedback is in the form of 2 in-class tests (60%) and one coursework (40%).

Strategic Supply Chain Management (10 credits)

This module aims to provide students with a critical understanding of the fundamental building blocks of Supply Chain Management (SCM) and e-Supply Chains from a strategic perspective with a view to developing their capabilities in modelling, analysing, diagnosing and re-designing/improving supply chains.

It covers Understanding the Supply Chain; Strategies alignment; Supply Chain performance; Supply Chain benchmarking; Sourcing decisions; Supply Chain network design; Sustainability in the supply chain and case studies.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • display an understanding of the fundamental building blocks of supply chains, including terminology; factors associated with SCM (business, technological, logistical and legal factors) and the relationship between traditional management functions and technology (such as marketing, purchasing, IT etc)
  • demonstrate a critical understanding of how to analyse and diagnose supply chains from a strategic perspective by modelling supply chains; analysing supply chain practices and performance and drawing up supply chain improvement/development strategies for a chosen business
  • display an understanding of sustainability issues in modern supply chains including key concepts; methods to assess sustainability and the ability to propose strategic improvements for the sustainability of supply chains

Assessment and feedback is in the form of two in-class tests (40%) and one coursework (60%).

Enterprise Resource Planning (10 credits)

This module aims to develop a critical understanding of operation, structure and implementation issues around enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems as used in industry. Students learn how a typical ERP system works using an up-to-date SAP training package and consider the real-life use of a typical software package within an organisation.

The module covers: Business Excellence; What is ERP?; Business Planning and Control; Expected Benefits; How does ERP work?; ERP Pre-Requisites; Selecting the right system; Implementation Planning.

At the end of this module students will have a critical understanding of:

  • terminology relating to MRP, ERPII and ERP
  • the benefits and limitations of using ERP systems for making operational, tactical and strategic decisions within businesses, including the ways in which ERP systems may support or hinder decision making at different levels
  • learning to operate and build a product in a SAP environment
  • the scope, implications, logic, critical requirements to facilitate successful implementation of ERP systems, in particular the relationship between ERP systems, other ICT systems, business processes and human factors

Assessment and feedback is in the form of a 40 minute quiz (40%) and one coursework (60%).

Engineering Risk Management (10 credits)

This module aims to introduce the basic principles and techniques of engineering risk management and demonstrates the appropriate application of this knowledge within an engineering context.

The module covers: Risk definitions and basic risks in engineering; Risk management processes; Reliability - achieving reliability; Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Safety (RAMS) cycle; failure rate; Mean Time Between Failure; Mean Time to Fail; Mean Life; failure stages within bathtub distribution; downtime; repair time and availability; Risk classification - failure rate; severity and detection; As Low As Reasonably Practicable (ALARP); Risk identification - Failure Modes and Affects Analysis; Hazard and Operability Study; Fault and Event Tree Analysis; Risk-based decision making – uncertainty, decision trees, Pareto optimality, Analytic Hierarchy Process and Risk legislation and litigation in engineering.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • demonstrate awareness of and ability to make general evaluations of risk issues in the context of the particular specialisation, including health & safety, environmental and commercial risk
  • demonstrate awareness of relevant regulatory requirements governing engineering activities
  • demonstrate ability to work with information that may be incomplete or uncertain, quantify the effect of this on the design and, where appropriate, use theory or experimental research to mitigate deficiencies

Assessment and feedback is in the form of a group coursework to show understanding of the risk management process in practice (100% for group contribution and submission of main reports).

Management of Total Quality & Continuous Improvement (10 credits)

This module aims to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the key principles, concepts, tools and techniques of total quality management and continuous improvement together with an awareness of how these can be used to design and deliver an integrated continuous improvement programme.

It covers an Introduction to Total Quality Management including definitions, basic elements and quality costing; ISO Quality Management System Standards; Quality improvement tools; Reliability Engineering and Continuous Improvement Concepts (FMEA, Lean methodologies, Kaizen, Poka Yoke, Theory of constraints).

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • understand the key principles, concepts, tools and techniques of total quality management and continuous improvement
  • apply key principles, concepts, tools and techniques of total quality management and continuous improvement, including planning for real-life application of tools and techniques
  • formulate improvement strategies within a particular context

Assessment and feedback is in the form of one group work (a case study report, 40%) and one individual coursework (a journal article, 60%).

Fundamentals Of Lean Six Sigma (10 credits)

This module aims to introduce students to the principles of Lean and Six Sigma. From Continuous Improvement approaches to organisational requirements, the module covers the critical success factors needed to support sustainable and effective business transformation.

The module covers: an Introduction to Lean Thinking, Six Sigma, and Lean Six Sigma (LSS); Comparing and Contrasting Lean & Six Sigma; DMAIC Continuous Improvement Methodology; LSS project characterisation and selection; Lean and Six Sigma metrics; Overview of basic Lean Tools and Techniques including: affinity diagram, project charter, project selection matrices, SPC, Ishikawa, 5 Why’s, 5S, SMED, DoE, etc.; Evolution of Lean Six Sigma (from manufacturing to service environments and the implications of each).

At the end of this module, students will be able to:

  • gain an appreciation for Lean Six Sigma as a Continuous Improvement methodology, and understand the implications of its application in manufacturing, transactional and service processes
  • apply the Lean Six Sigma methodology (DMAIC) and basic Continuous Improvement tools to solve real world problems
  • evaluate the Critical Success Factors and fundamental barriers in the execution of both Lean & Six Sigma initiatives

Assessment and feedback is in the form of an exam (35%) and an assignment in the form of a project report (60%) and project presentation (5%).

Sustainable Product Design & Manufacturing (10 credits)

This module covers one of the major challenges of modern industry which is to address the need for sustainable product development and manufacturing. International legislation and increasing costs of fiscal instruments such as the landfill tax now aim to force producers to reduce the environmental impacts of their products and processes. Accelerating globalization and industrialization continues to exacerbate complexity of sustainability. Whilst manufacturers are constantly required to lower their costs and maintain their competitiveness, legislations require them to look at lifecycle costs.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • understand the importance of sustainable product development and sustainable manufacturing and how to establish competitive advantage and appreciate the key legislation affecting modern industry
  • demonstrate an understanding of the engineers’ role in problem & solution to this and how to establish competitive advantage (eg via operational efficiency and effectiveness, new opportunities and enhanced enhancing marketing and customer goodwill)
  • describe end- of- life issues and critically discuss the place of reuse processes in Sustainable Design and Manufacturing, as well as identifying the various reuse processes
  • identify the product features and characteristics that facilitate and hinder product recovery and redesign them for enhanced sustainability
  • identify the fundamental 'building blocks' of LCA and describe/illustrate the use of LCA in lifecycle decision making, as well as describing Biomimicry use in product design
Systems Thinking & Modelling (10 credits)

This module aims to introduce students to the theories and principles of Systems Thinking. The module also introduces the methods, tools and techniques for modelling, analysing, improving and designing systems in a variety of organisations including industrial, commercial and public sector.

The module covers: Systems theory, concepts and approaches; Hard and soft systems analysis and systems dynamics; Systems and organisational performance – including leadership in a systems environment and ‘design’ in a systems environment and Practical application of Systems Thinking.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • show clearer understanding and knowledge of hard and soft approaches and how they can be used to deal with complexity and system behaviour in a business context
  • develop understanding of fundamental cybernetic principles that form the foundations of Checkland’s Soft System Methodology and Beer’s Viable System Model
  • develop knowledge and skills in systems analysis and business process modelling
  • critically evaluate the most appropriate methodology to model, analyse and design engineering/business systems across a range of organisations
  • demonstrate an understanding of how to model a business system and to develop a solution to solve a business system problem
  • develop an awareness of the importance of system approaches in management interventions

Assessment and feedback is in the form of a group presentation and one coursework in the form of a reflective diary.

Advanced Materials & Production Technology (10 credits)

This module aims to provide students with an introduction to the fundamentals of advanced materials, characterisation and advanced surface engineering. The module also covers advanced machining processes and technologies and the principles and practices of rapid prototyping and manufacturing.

The module covers:

  • severe plastic deformation, materials properties and characterisation
  • advances in Machining including the machining of hard materials, high-speed machining, precision grinding technology, ultra-precision diamond turning and grinding technology
  • principles and practice of Layered Manufacturing
  • advanced Surface Engineering including physical-chemical functionalisation, electro-deposition, CVD, PVD, tools/mould treatment, nano- and multi-layered coating.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • describe processes of materials selection, characterisation, ultra-precision machining, rapid prototyping and advanced surface engineering
  • demonstrate know-how on key processing parameters and show numerical and analytical skills relating to the materials and process selections and parameter setting
  • identify key process parameters/variables in relation to process control and product quality
  • specify machines or manufacturing systems for the manufacture/creation of specified products/models or to propose design solutions for a manufacturing machine/system to address the manufacturing requirements identified

Assessment and feedback is in the form of four pieces of coursework (25% each).

Design of Experiments for Process Optimisation (10 credits)

This module aims to introduce students to statistically planned experiments and industrial measurements.

The module covers: Basic concepts of quality such as inspection and parameter design; Statistically planned experiments including two-level and three-level factorial experiments; Taguchi’s contribution to quality improvement including location/dispersion analysis and strategy for robust design; Test and measurement system including signals processing, DAQ hardware and software and Graphical programming (LabView).

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of design of experiments
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of Taguchi’s approach to quality improvement
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of test and measurement systems

Assessment and feedback is in the form of two pieces of coursework:

  • Coursework 1 – plan and evaluate a factorial experiment using Excel (60%)
  • Coursework 2 – design a data acquisition application using LabView (40%)

 

Remanufacturing (10 credits)

This module aims to develop a detailed understanding of the concept of remanufacture and its industrial application as well as new developments in the area. It explores the potential impact of remanufacture on a circular economy as well as the enablers and barriers.

The module covers: Remanufacture concepts & significance (including history, drivers, issues, future developments); Design for remanufacturing; Reverse logistics; Remanufacture disassembly; Lean remanufacture/Remanufacture Cleaning; Novel remanufacture tool and techniques.

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of remanufacturing concepts and its significance (including with respect to a circular economy) plus the major issues in operating remanufacture
  • technically analyse products’ status plus remanufacturing operations in order to enhance performance
  • demonstrate an understanding of various techniques in sustainable design
  • demonstrate understanding of major Design-for-remanufacture (DFRem) concepts and approaches and apply these

Assessment and feedback is in the form of two assignments:

  • (50%) this will be a report written in the format of an academic journal
  • (50%) this project involves the student carrying out a detailed analysis of the remanufacturing approaches within the context of a chosen remanufacturing organisation in order to enhance operational effectiveness
Mechatronic Systems Design Techniques (10 credits)

This module introduces design techniques and mechatronic systems at an advanced level in order to enable students to understand the application of advanced design techniques and development platforms for modern products and engineering systems. It provides opportunities for students to develop technology-focused products/systems by using the state-of-the-art hardware platforms and industry-standard software development tools within the class environment.

The module covers: Mechatronic system design process (including Product/system design specifications (PDS), concept generation and selection, mechatronic system design and flow chart diagrams); Sensing and actuation (including sensing theory, sensor selection, drive design and motor control); Control systems (understanding and applying control theory in a mechatronic system design); Hardware and software design (including software design basics, algorithm and code design, programming tools and software engineering principles); Prototyping and evaluation (prototyping methods and tools including rapid prototyping and computer modelling).

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced design methodologies, design process models and techniques for mechatronic systems
  • Demonstrate the design process to generate mechatronic design solutions and prototyping skills
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of state-of-the-art processor architecture on modern embedded computing platforms
  • Describe processor architecture and the interface with real-world interactions
  • Apply knowledge to the modern embedded computing platforms, including selection of sensors and actuator to formulate a basic control system in mechatronic product design
  • Apply design basics and tools to the development of software for mechatronic products

Assessment and feedback is in the form of two assignments. Both are carried out in groups and assessed in terms of the quality of report and presentation/demonstration (50%/50%).

Entry requirements

MSc

First or second-class Honours degree, or equivalent, in a relevant engineering, technology or science related discipline.

PgDip

Degree, or good HND plus relevant industrial experience, may be considered for entry to the Postgraduate Diploma. Depending on satisfactory progress, students may transfer from the Diploma to the Masters course.

English Language Requirements

IELTS (for international students)
6.0 overall with no individual component below 5.5

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course held at the University of Strathclyde International Study Centre, for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the academic entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

Upon successful completion, you will be able to progress to this degree course at the University of Strathclyde.

Fees & funding

2019/20 full-time

The fees quoted below are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Scotland/EU

  • £8,100

Rest of UK

  • £9,250

International

  • £20,050

2019/20 part-time

Part-time, campus-based courses are typically completed over two years and are available for Scotland/EU and Rest of UK students. Fees are normally charged per year at 50% of the published full-time fee. Fees for students studying over a longer period will be appropriately adjusted.

Please note, students on programmes of study of more than one year should be aware that tuition fees are revised annually and may be subject to increase in subsequent years of study. Annual increases will generally reflect UK inflation rates and increases to programme delivery costs.

For more information on whether a part-time course could suit your needs please email dmem-pgt@strath.ac.uk

How can I fund my course?

Scholarship search

Faculty of Engineering Excellence Scholarship (FEES) for International Students

If you're applying for an MSc course you'll be eligible to apply for a Faculty of Engineering Excellence Scholarship offering up to £3,000 towards your tuition fees.

The scholarship is available for application to all self-funded, new international (non-EU) fee paying students holding an offer of study for an MSc programme in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Strathclyde. Please note you must have an offer of study for a full-time course at Strathclyde before applying.

You must start your full-time MSc programme at Strathclyde in the coming academic year (2019-20).

Scottish and non-UK EU postgraduate students

Scottish and non-UK EU postgraduate students may be able to apply for support from the Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS). The support is in the form of a tuition fee loan and for eligible students, a living cost loan. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Students coming from England

Students ordinarily resident in England may be to apply for postgraduate support from Student Finance England. The support is a loan of up to £10,280 which can be used for both tuition fees and living costs. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Students coming from Wales

Students ordinarily resident in Wales may be to apply for postgraduate support from Student Finance Wales. The support is a loan of up to £10,280 which can be used for both tuition fees and living costs. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Students coming from Northern Ireland

Postgraduate students who are ordinarily resident in Northern Ireland may be able to apply for support from Student Finance Northern Ireland. The support is a tuition fee loan of up to £5,500. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

International students

We have a large range of scholarships available to help you fund your studies. Check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Please note

The fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

Careers

With continual advancements in the market place, including customers wanting personalised products, faster turnaround times, globalisation, as well as increasing backings of local businesses, product design continues to evolve and stay at the forefront of our physical and online stores.

Studying product design gives you the broad theoretical knowledge and practical skillset you’ll need to use production methods and materials creatively to pursue a career in a variety of sectors, with potential graduate job roles such as:

  • Product Designer
  • CAD Technician
  • Furniture Designer
  • Interior and Spatial designer
  • Graphic Designer
  • Product Manager
  • Materials Engineer
  • Product Developer

With the importance that employers place behind industrial experience our masters is the perfect combination of learning from leaders in the design, production and manufacturing fields, as well as gaining direct industry experience through the industrial group project which you will be able to add to your CV and discuss during interviews.

Example employers include:

  • industrial and domestic product manufacturers
  • car manufacturers
  • point-of-sale designers
  • retailers

According to PayScale, the average Product Designer salary is £24,507*, the average salary for a Product Manager (Software)* is £44,535 and for any entrepreneurial students, the average salary for a Product Owner is £40,921*.

*Last accessed 18 February 2019

Contact us

Apply

Product Design

Qualification: PG Diploma, Start date: Sep 2019, Mode of delivery: attendance, full-time

Product Design

Qualification: PG Diploma, Start date: Sep 2019, Mode of delivery: attendance, part-time

Product Design

Qualification: MSc, Start date: Sep 2019, Mode of delivery: attendance, part-time

Product Design

Qualification: MSc, Start date: Sep 2019, Mode of delivery: attendance, full-time

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Department of Design, Manufacture & Engineering Management

We're focused on 'Delivering Total Engineering' through research excellence, effective industrial partnerships and creative engineering education.